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  1. #101
    Member Sodburner's Avatar
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    Is gear drive the cats arse? Or can a guy live with belt drive


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  2. #102
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    I like belt drive for gunsmithing. However they are both good other wise you wouldn't have a choice.

  3. #103
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    Most modern lathes, unless they are lighter duty bench machines are gear drive, older used equipment like a Southbend and Atlas are belt drive. We had an old 8' Southbend in High School that used a flat belt. In good shape, they are all great!

  4. #104
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    Now that we have all beaten the subject of lathes and milling machines to death is the next tool which every shop has.
    That would be a disk/belt sander. Just about any one will do as long as your disk is eight inches or larger and runs more or less true. The rest simply doesn't matter. (you can go real cheap on this one LOL )
    The disk sander is used for stock mods such as adding a recoil pad or doing the finishing touches on a stock that has been either lengthened or made shorter. This is one of those bread and butter jobs of every shop.
    Last edited by grc1; 10-10-2017 at 09:28 AM. Reason: I need a new keyboard

  5. #105
    Member Sodburner's Avatar
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    Check. My father has a beauty woodworking shop with all the toys. He is a perfectionist I wish I had more of that in me.


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  6. #106
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    You also have to be a perfectionist to be a gunsmith. LOL

    This last tool has caused more desagreements than any other tool in the gunsmithing trade. It is also one of your best money earning tools.
    This would be your setup for drilling and tapping anything which requires a scope base. I am talking about your receiver drilling and tapping jig.
    The best and only jig that a profesional would use is the Forester Jig system. These units are designed to drill and tap virtualy any firearm made. They are simple to use and are dead nuts the most accurate way of drilling a receiver. We spent two weeks in gunsmithing school learning all the ins and outs of drilling everything from 1911 slides ,double barrel rifles and even revolvers. And every thing in between. It is also used for milling dove tail slots (very slow, but very accurate ) and setting up sights so they are perfectly straight .

    You will hear things such as " I can do that without a jig." That is good news because half of the time people will screw up and now you use your jig to fix their mistakes. That means money in your pocket.
    Years ago we had one such gunsmith in Winnipeg who did all his work on a mill without using a proper jig. I ended up with a lot of work and some good cash to boot just fixing his F---UPs.
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    Last edited by grc1; 10-11-2017 at 10:18 AM.

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    GTW (10-11-2017)

  8. #107
    Member Sodburner's Avatar
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    That is a beauty.... btw I wouldn't say I'm not a perfectionist... ask my kids or wife for that matter, but my dad puts me to shame


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  9. #108
    Senior Member Drache's Avatar
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    Generally anyone can become a "gunsmith" simply by calling themselves one. It's that simple. Being a good gunsmith though is something else.

    As for me I went and took an online course through PCDI. It doesn't really do much besides providing really nice manuals on how to fix a variety of various guns. Then you find someone who can apprentice under for as long as you'd like (I'm currently apprenticing with my boss). The online course will give you nice "certificate" that states you passed the course but in Canada that certificate is pretty much worthless anyways but it makes people feel a little better dropping their guns off.

  10. #109
    Member Sodburner's Avatar
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    I wondered about the "certificate" how worthwhile it was... so am I right in assuming the government doesn't have any standards when registering a business as "gunsmith" that seems a bit weird... our government can't trust us to wipe our assets after a bathroom break



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  11. #110
    Senior Member Drache's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sodburner View Post
    I wondered about the "certificate" how worthwhile it was... so am I right in assuming the government doesn't have any standards when registering a business as "gunsmith" that seems a bit weird... our government can't trust us to wipe our assets after a bathroom break



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    All you really need is a firearms business license, a bunch of tools, and start calling yourself a gunsmith

    My boss took the course and started working as an "apprentice" under a local gunsmith for about 10 years I think it was then bought out the gunsmith and started his own business.

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    grc1 (10-13-2017)

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