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  1. #11
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    My experience has been consistent with Rory's, very rarely has a round not gone off on the second try. One's that really are defective I'll disassemble if it's a pricier round, 9mm I usually just toss into the misfires bin.

  2. #12
    One Mile Mentor tigrr's Avatar
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    22 I just toss. Most of the rest I wait a couple of minutes and then take home in my ammo box. I get very few misfires because I am very conscious of contaminating my primers. I wash my hands before touching any primers because body oil, press lube, bullet lube will make them inert.
    The challenge of retirement is how to spend time without spending money.
    There is no place in an anti's head where reason can enter. from a Napoleon saying with a tweak.
    Look around is there someone you can introduce to shooting because that’s the only way we will buck the anti gun trend sweeping Canada! "tigrr 2006"

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    Rory McCanuck (11-14-2017)

  4. #13
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    If a bad cartridge doesn't go bang within minutes it's not going to. There's no need for special transporting precautions.
    "...can be recycled..." Bullet, case and powder for sure. Possibly the primer too. Depends on what the cause was though.
    "...an impact bullet puller..." A kinetic puller will do nicely. Nothing comes anywhere near the primer. Best surface to bash on is a big, igneous, rock with one flattish side. Wood is too soft and so is concrete, sometimes.
    There is no 100% reliable method of killing primers. Neither gas nor oil is 100% reliable. A firing pin is though. Rechamber and try it again. If 2 or 3 solid hits doesn't set it off, it's dead.

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    Suputin (11-15-2017)

  6. #14
    Moderator kennymo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rory McCanuck View Post
    I'd re-cock the gun and have another go at it. If the primer isn't completely seated, the firing pin hits it and pushes it in, seating it a bit more, hopefully all the way. Giving it another strike from the firing pin will set it off, as it now has something to push against.

    If it still won't go off, then yes, pull it, save the bullet and powder and de-prime.
    Don't be worried about setting the primer off while depriming
    This. All the misfires I've ever experienced were due to firing pin issues (other than 22 LR and a few 7.62x39 rounds with incredibly hard primers). A couple of bolt action rifles with some heavy grease in the bolt, when it got cold out and they sat cocked for too long the firing pins wouldn't accelerate fast enough to detonate the priming compound. Lifting the bolt handle and firing again immediately was the cure. In pump shotguns, I had a Marlin Glenfield that the previous owner had put so much spray lube into it wouldn't fire or even cycle the action after a couple hours in the snow chasing partridge. And my CIL pump that would only set off every second or third round fed into it turned out to have a cracked firing pin.
    Cleverly disguised as a responsible adult.

  7. #15
    Senior Member Mark-II's Avatar
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    If it's a .22lr semi auto you may have crud built up on the bolt of breech face that is preventing the bolt closing completely or is cushioning/impairing the firing pin impact.

    If you get a string of .22 misfires for no reason in a semi, crud is a likely problem.

    Also for .22 rotate the case and strike a different part of the rim the next time. Hitting the struck part again doesn't reliably work.


    I pull duds with either type of puller. The kinetic I just whack against the tail of the bench vice. Neither vice nor plastic puller really cares. I do like the collet puller if I'm unfortunate enough to have to do more than a few. It's simply faster and the powder doesn't go all over.
    Schrödinger's Gat - The logical paradox which posits that a firearm, stored safe in the home, is at the same time On The Streets

  8. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by linung View Post
    So silly me... I was thinking that I should keep the misfires and take them apart! For scientific evaluation! I think at the most the bullet and brass can be recycled.

    I found an old iPad case that would be the right size for it.
    Attachment 4951

    However it seems to be stiff plastic, most likely made in China. I don't think it would be a safe transport option. Also I got an impact bullet puller, which may not be an good idea.

    So for the reloaders, what do you do?

    So far I've been tossing them in the misfire box at the range.
    You are going to "scientifically evaluate" a dud primer? Whookay!

    How do you transport your live ammo to the range? One might suggest thats how you could transport dud ammo home? Ammo doesn't just ignite for no reason. This isn't magic.

    If an impact puller isn't a good idea, then why do companies make them?




    Quote Originally Posted by glockfan View Post
    back in the days when shooting ranges were only ''an option''' , i was dipping them in my chainsaw fuel(gas mix) for awhile (which was disabling the ammo) then was tossing the now ''inert''' ammo in the trash can ; a well known trick people were commonly using a long time ago . these days since ranges are the ''only'' option , i may dump them in the misfire bucket at my club or kynetic hammer them if i elect to reload the ''faulty'' ammo for whatever reason...
    Did you ever actually test to see if your home "inactivation method" actually worked reliably or you just assume cause some anonymous poster on the internet said so? I accidentally ran a primed case through the washing machine and that primer ignited no problem. I'd suggest that soaking sealed ammo in just about anything would do SFA with respect to inactivating the round.

  9. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by linung View Post
    Yep!
    I only consider bullet and brass recyclable. No way to tell if primer bad or powder issue.
    There absolutely is. A primer that ignites with no powder is more than powerful enough to drive the bullet partially into the lands. If a round doesn't fire and is extracted with the bullet in place then the cause was the primer.

  10. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by tigrr View Post
    22 I just toss. Most of the rest I wait a couple of minutes and then take home in my ammo box. I get very few misfires because I am very conscious of contaminating my primers. I wash my hands before touching any primers because body oil, press lube, bullet lube will make them inert.
    BS. This is an old wives tale passed around by people who haven't actually tried it.

    I have loaded many hundreds of thousands of rounds in the last 30 years and never once paid any attention to clean hands. I have prob touched every one of those primers and pretty much never have misfires.

  11. #19
    Senior Member RobertMcC's Avatar
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    Only miss fire I worry about is 60mm Mortar. Other than that, no special treatment. Down in the basement I got a coffee can I throw the duds or destroyed cases in.
    When the rich wage war, It's the poor who die.

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    Suputin (11-15-2017)

  13. #20
    Senior Member glockfan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suputin View Post
    You are going to "scientifically evaluate" a dud primer? Whookay!

    How do you transport your live ammo to the range? One might suggest thats how you could transport dud ammo home? Ammo doesn't just ignite for no reason. This isn't magic.

    If an impact puller isn't a good idea, then why do companies make them?






    Did you ever actually test to see if your home "inactivation method" actually worked reliably or you just assume cause some anonymous poster on the internet said so? I accidentally ran a primed case through the washing machine and that primer ignited no problem. I'd suggest that soaking sealed ammo in just about anything would do SFA with respect to inactivating the round.
    LOL...we've been doing it the whole 70's 80's till the lands around became crowded with city pussies and we got to start to hit the range to avoid troubles...

    i can testify that a center fire round immerged into gas mix for days-weeks is completely disabled primer included . while we never made a big deal out of it , i've confirmed the theory by myself ; couple days is enough ; just the fuel vapes is enough to make the powder partly or completely inactive ; hence in direct contact with gasoline : powder AND primer gets killed...and since most rifle cases are hardly crimped....
    Quote Originally Posted by Forbes/Hutton View Post
    I was hoping he would show up and do something useful in front of the cameras. Like beat the flames out with his face.

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