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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Petamocto View Post
    Rory, thereís no to it than joules on target, though.

    Obviously everyone concedes shot placement matters, but up for discussion is whether multiple medium bullets is better than one large one (slug), and whether the Henry is a good choice.

    I canít really think of a better NR option that you can (sort of) fit in a holster.
    Me neither. Still unsure if it's a good idea but I can't find a NR that can be holster for easy access like the Henry Mare's Leg. Maybe it's a better idea to bring a short barrel shotgun and put it in the pack.

    Sent from my SM-G935W8 using Tapatalk

  2. #12
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    Wolf attacks are so rare you have more of a chance of a tree falling on you...

    Bears might have a go at you... might. Again it's a rarity. People are far too scared of the bush.

    I own a Rossi ranch hand in .44. I've got a proper Butt stock on mine and a normal sized lever... with the stupid stock they come with they are hard to shoot at best add a goofy holster and I can't think of a worse option for a defensive firearm. Far too heavy to be hanging off your hip.

    Out of a rifle the .44 mag is really a pipsqueak round... there are far better choices.

  3. #13
    Canadian ForcesShort end of the Ban Stick normmus's Avatar
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    I have a 14" 12 gauge pump in a scabbard that I wear like a backpack for when I'm in situations where I want hands to be free and also want a firearm.

  4. #14
    Member Comanchero's Avatar
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    In .44 magnum, you would have the ballistic equivalent of a long-barrelled revolver. And, such has been popular in the USA for a back-up sidearm while hunting for many years.

    Unfortunately, a mare's leg makes a poor handgun. You can't hold and aim it properly; it needs two-handed operation; and the recoil with .44 magnum is going to feel like firing a sawed-off pump shotgun with no stock.

    Still, I suppose that a poor handgun is better than no handgun at all.
    Also, I suppose that you could buy and fit the regular Henry butt-stock and a sling.
    As a short-barrelled rifle, it would be a very acceptable handgun replacement, if you were allowed to carry it during a bow season.

    In stopping power, a .44 magnum carbine is equivalent to a .30-30 Winchester carbine, and many prefer them over the .30-30 for deer hunting. And there really isn't any other type of 13" barreled repeating carbine that would be legal to own, or carry for hunting.
    Last edited by Comanchero; 04-28-2018 at 08:40 AM.

  5. The Following User Liked This Post By Comanchero

    Rory McCanuck (04-26-2018)

  6. #15
    Member GunDude's Avatar
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    You can get a really nice Mares Leg Holster here...

    https://www.etsy.com/ca/listing/5852...ch_query=mares leg&ref=sr_gallery-1-1

  7. #16
    Member Comanchero's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GunDude View Post
    You can get a really nice Mares Leg Holster here...

    https://www.etsy.com/ca/listing/5852...ch_query=mares leg&ref=sr_gallery-1-1
    Nice. Then you can be this guy:


  8. #17
    Super Moderator Rory McCanuck's Avatar
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    I can't believe Steve McQueen shot Michael Landon in the back!
    Don't blame me, I didn't vote for that clown. Oct 20, '15

  9. #18
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    I got a Rossi ranch hand in .357 mag for a “too good to be true” price. NIB, unfired. When they first hit years ago, a buddy bought the .357, a .44 mag and a .45 Colt. He shot the .44 first, liked it and never fired the other two.
    Useless except as a range toy, I hit a sale at Boyd’s stocks for a model 92, got it for $55. Fit fine,other than a bit proud in the area behind the trigger. What I was left with is a Sweet little bush carbine...12in. Bbl. a bit over 5lbs, it carries in your hand easily all day. Really fast pointing, a fibre optic front sight and a Skinner peep in the rear. It shoots “minute of deer” at 100yds, quite easily rings the gong at 100 with open sights.
    It’s a stout action, so I cooked up a really warm load with 180 gr. Hard cast lead bullets. At 100yds, it has the same ballistic energy as a .44mag at the muzzle of a 6” barrelled revolver. I took a bunch of coyotes on a relatives farm, and the knock downs were very decisive.i’d have No hesitation shooting a deer with it, and i’m Confident that it’d stand it’s ground with a black bear. It’s become my go-to truck gun...so easy to carry and use. Depending on loads, you can go for a bunny busting .38 load, up to 180gr. Defensive load, and have a really versatile carbine.

  10. The Following User Liked This Post By YYCADM

    Rory McCanuck (09-02-2018)

  11. #19
    Senior Member labradort's Avatar
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    Re: the debate about knockdown power...

    https://www.outdoorlife.com/articles...m-flatten-game

    The author goes through multiple theories with various firearms and calibers.

    I thought the last section of the article was interesting. It could explain why many hunters have a contrary opinion about the magic round that immediately dropped the animal. It has to do with the heart rhythm at the time the bullet strikes...

    NEW EVIDENCE

    This epiphany came about a couple of years back when I was passing a pleasant afternoon in a bird-watching blind in the wilds of Namibia. A previous guest had obligingly left a few copies of a South African outdoor magazine and as I idly leafed through the pages my attention was arrested by an article on knockdown effect. It was not the same tired old stuff about ballistics and penetration, but the result of a controlled study carried out by professional veterinarians engaged in a buffalo culling operation.

    Whereas virtually all of our opinions about knockdown power are based on isolated examples, the data gathered during the culling operation was taken from a number of animals. Even more important, the animals were then examined and dissected in a scientific manner by professionals.

    Predictably, some of the buffalo dropped where they were shot and some didn't, even though all received near-identical hits in the vital heart-lung area. When the brains of all the buffalo were removed, the researchers discovered that those that had been knocked down instantly had suffered massive rupturing of blood vessels in the brain. The brains of animals that hadn't fallen instantly showed no such damage. So what is the connection?

    Their conclusion was that the bullets that killed instantly had struck just at the moment of the animal's heartbeat! The arteries to the brain, already carrying a full surge of blood pressure, received a mega-dose of additional pressure from the bullet's impact, thus creating a blood pressure overload and rupturing the vessels.

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