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  1. #11
    Super Moderator Rory McCanuck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by weasel View Post
    The wedge may well be captive, secured by a tiny pin passing through a slot in the wedge. Removing the wedge completely will do damage. If it is captive, the wedge should move far enough to allow the barrel to be unhooked and removed...
    Huh, learn something new every day, thanks!
    Don't blame me, I didn't vote for that clown. Oct 20, '15

  2. #12
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    So it is 100% pinned it only pulls out about 3/4 of the way, I got the barrel to start to lift away from the stock but it's only lifting up a few centimetres then giving resistance.

    I was under the assumption the barrel would lift right off at the seam behind the nippel shown in pictures.

    Do I need to remove the screws in the tang and lift it off with the barrel?

    DSC_0050.jpegDSC_0051.jpegDSC_0047.jpeg

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  3. #13
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    Finally after a bit of research and some old fashioned trial and error I managed to convince the barrel to separate from the stock. It appears that the hook on the end of the barrel has been attached to the tang for so long they don't want to part ways as I had to remove the tang with the barrel.

    As previously stated the proof marks were all tucked under the stock, are the proofs as suspected from Birmingham? DSC_0052.jpegDSC_0053.jpegDSC_0056.jpeg

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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rory McCanuck View Post
    Huh, learn something new every day, thanks!
    And there's the elusive pin in the wedge... DSC_0059.jpeg

    Sent from my F3213 using Tapatalk

  5. The Following User Liked This Post By Timruins

    Rory McCanuck (05-17-2018)

  6. #15
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    Birmingham proofs. 14 gauge.
    You were lucky removing the barrel and tang in one unit. Sometimes there is a screw coming up from in front of the trigger, securing the standing breech.
    Apply some penetrating oil, and it might be possible to encourage the barrel and standing breech to separate. Be careful - tangs can be broken.

  7. The Following User Liked This Post By weasel

    Timruins (05-16-2018)

  8. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by weasel View Post
    Birmingham proofs. 14 gauge.
    You were lucky removing the barrel and tang in one unit. Sometimes there is a screw coming up from in front of the trigger, securing the standing breech.
    Apply some penetrating oil, and it might be possible to encourage the barrel and standing breech to separate. Be careful - tangs can be broken.
    So I did some research on the proofs and one document says that the proofs were used from 1868 - 1925 another document dates them between 1875 - 1887.

    Any idea if those dates would be in the realm of accurate and if there is any way to get a more accurate idea.

    And just any good penetrating oil or are there some that I should avoid?

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  9. #17
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    The B'mingham proofs you show are post 1813, to 1904.

    Any barrel maker's name ?

    These plainer pieces were made for a long period, say from 1845-50 -to about 1900.

    It should make a good sound shooting gun. :-)

  10. The Following User Liked This Post By P-B.

    Timruins (05-16-2018)

  11. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by P-B. View Post
    The B'mingham proofs you show are post 1813, to 1904.

    Any barrel maker's name ?

    These plainer pieces were made for a long period, say from 1845-50 -to about 1900.

    It should make a good sound shooting gun. :-)
    The only markings I've found are the proofs as well as the 14 stamp on the underside of the barrel and breech, Belfast on the top of the barrel and Braddell on the side plate of the lock.

    So I have no idea on the barrel makers name.

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  12. #19
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    Sometimes the barrel maker's initials are found on the bottom of the barrel. Unless they are the initials of one of the famous barrel makers, they generally don't mean much.
    Generic shotguns like this one were manufactured in large numbers.
    Wipe out the bore, and drop in a small penlight. See what the bore condition is like; might be a good shooter.

  13. #20
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    Weasel,

    I had a very similar plain Jane type to fix for a friend. (lock-work, and under rib to re-lay & barrel brown to bring out twist) the barrel was marked Rose's underneath. A very large B'mingham barrel making family.
    Sometimes we get lucky with maker's names and often we don't. :-)

    Richard.

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