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  1. #1
    Senior Member Ruff's Avatar
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    Why The World’s Militaries Love The Glock

    Nothing better than posting articles I absolutely agree with. And for the record, as a longtime fan of double barrel shotguns for ruffed grouse, I've come to realise that Glock had me at "pointability."



    Why The World’s Militaries Love The Glock




    By Kyle Mizokami, The National Interest on May 16, 2018

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    For much of the mid-twentieth century, handgun development was in a period of stagnation. The development of the semiautomatic pistol had ushered in a new weapon that, although more complex than a revolver, had a higher ammunition capacity. Quickly adopted by armies around the world, the steel-framed semiautomatic reigned for decades. Then, in the 1980s, something came along that disrupted the firearms industry: the Glock pistol. Today it’s carried by armies worldwide, from the U.S. Army Rangers to the British Armed Forces.

    The story of the Glock began in February 1980, when the Austrian army was looking to replace antiquated, World War II–era Walther P-38 handguns with something new. Gaston Glock, an Austrian citizen who ran a small business producing field knives and blades for the Austrian Army, overheard a conversation between two Austrian Army colonels and learned the Army was in the process of searching for a new pistol.

    According to Glock: The Rise of America’s Gun, Glock asked the minister of defense whether or not his shop could compete, and the answer was, “Yes, why not?”

    Glock knew nothing about handguns. He had spent two or three days in World War II as a conscript teenager in the Wehrmacht, but that had had no practical benefit for him. The machine shop owner went out and purchased a number of competing pistols, including the Italian Beretta 92F, the Swiss-German Sig Sauer P220, the Czech CZ75 and a modern version of the Walther P-38, the P-1. Glock took the weapons home and studied them, how they worked and how they were constructed. He also consulted firearms specialists, soliciting them for ideas on what they would like to see in a modern handgun.

    Glock learned that the Austrian army wanted a pistol with a high ammunition capacity, more than the eight rounds of the Walther P-38. It should weigh no more than twenty-eight ounces, with a streamlined design and a consistent, light trigger pull. It should also have no more than forty parts. After a year of tinkering and product development, Glock filed for a patent for a pistol design on April 30, 1981. He delivered four test pistols the Austrian army on May 19, 1982. The resulting pistol, known as the Glock 17, swept the army’s handgun trials and was accepted for service, earning Glock a contract for twenty thousand of his new pistols.

    The Glock 17 was a pistol unlike any other. Strong and light, the lower half of the pistol is a polymer frame housing a steel fire control group. The upper half of the pistol is made from a single block of steel. This use of plastics allowed Glock to keep the handgun’s weight down to twenty-three ounces—a quarter pound less than the army requirement. Other competitors such as the Beretta 92F and the CZ75 used a steel frame. Glock simplified the design to just thirty-four parts. Longtime gun manufacturer Beretta’s 92F pistol, by comparison, had more than seventy parts.

    Glock spent considerable time working on his pistol’s “pointability,” a term that describes a pistol’s natural ability to act as an extension of the shooter’s hand and eye coordination. This makes the pistol easy to aim, translating into a more user-friendly, accurate weapon. The Walther P-38, by comparison “points badly.” Glock also concentrated on making his weapon reliable over all else, and in a competition that allowed for twenty jams in ten thousand shots, his pistol only failed once.

    The Glock 17 was also one of the first high-capacity pistols. The Browning Hi Power, designed by John M. Browning himself, was one of the first high-capacity shooters and carried thirteen rounds. The Beretta 92 could carry an impressive fifteen rounds. The Glock 17, however, beat the competition, packing seventeen rounds of nine-millimeter parabellum ammunition, more than doubling the P-38’s magazine capacity.

    In the intervening thirty-five years, the Glock has become the dominant handgun in a crowded field of competitors. Despite stiff competition from countries emulating his polymer design, Glock 17 handguns serve with such diverse forces as the British Armed Forces, the Swedish Armed Forces, Indian special forces, the Iraqi military, the Israeli Defense Forces and the Yemeni military. The Glock 17 outfits dozens of armies and hundreds of police forces worldwide. U.S. Army Rangers and Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command use the compact version, the Glock 19, and U.S. Special Forces—including the shadowy Delta Force—carry the .40 Smith & Wesson–caliber Glock 22.

    Gaston Glock credits his success in handgun design to his lack of knowledge about handguns. That gave him no preconceived notions about what a handgun should be, and allowed him to focus on just a handful of requirements: ease of use, simplicity and reliability. Glock didn’t try to invent a pistol that would take over the world, just win a contract for the Austrian army. The rest of the world simply decided it wanted what he was selling. Somewhere in there is a lesson for defense contractors everywhere.

    This article originally appeared on The National Interest


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    "All organizations that are not actually right-wing will over time become left-wing." --John O'Sullivan (1989)

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  3. #2
    Senior Member glockfan's Avatar
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    simplicity enhance reliability.

    when i look at the weight carried by LEO,s and military on their battle belt, sure enough the glock comes as a savior. simplicity in design , reliability,accuracy and easyness of functionnings gets the win for those who work in hostile environnements.
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    I was hoping he would show up and do something useful in front of the cameras. Like beat the flames out with his face.
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    This intellectual midget needs to rub the contents of a large tube of PREPARATION H® on his ego and then smack himself with the empty tube until he's in a permanent coma. !

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    Senior Member Mark-II's Avatar
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    What I would like to see someone properly innovate is a handgun that uses double feed mags, and for that to become the new sliced bread.

    So that you'd never have to regret leaving the loading tool at home

    Double stack, single feed is one thing that we're still back in 1935 with
    Schrödinger's Gat - The logical paradox which posits that a firearm, stored safe in the home, is at the same time On The Streets

  6. #4
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    They just work, plain and simple. I don't find it that accurate but that is my problem as I need more trigger time using one.

  7. #5
    Senior Member LB303's Avatar
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    Just my two cents, but for recreational shooting Glocks are no better than anything else.
    Not criticising Glocks, if you like them, go for it. Tried it, just not in love with it.
    Not the most comfortable grip for me. And the trigger wasn't so special.
    Reliable, light weight, yadda yadda OK I get why they're popular with those who carry as part of their job.
    For most of us, Canadian reality is, they print carry permits on unicorn hide, so weight is a non-factor.
    Mag capacity is a cruel joke. Reliability is not life-or-death at the shooting bench.
    So to me the field is wide open for range handguns.
    Met someone at the range once who let me try his Salient Glock.
    That was like a whole different gun. But for $2500 it should be.
    Sorry for raining on the parade.

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  9. #6
    Senior Member RangeBob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LB303 View Post
    Canadian reality is, they print carry permits on unicorn hide
    .

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  11. #7
    Canadian Forceswww.specterarms.ca Specter Arms's Avatar
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    I would think that if "Glock Perfection" is an accurate slogan they would not need to put out a new generation every few months.
    Guns, optics and accessories along with sound professional advice at
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  12. #8
    Canadian ForcesMember 6MT's Avatar
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    I like Glocks too.

  13. #9
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    Militaries everywhere buy whatever is sold by the lowest bidder. Glock Inc. has gone out of their way to win military contract(and PD) bidding wars.
    The assorted troopies, who have no say of any kind about the kit they're issued, prefer stuff that is lightweight. A Glock 17 weighs 25.06 oz empty. A Sig M226 weighs 34 ounces empty.
    However, pistols in the military are status symbols or last ditch self defence tools. They are not primary weapons.

  14. #10
    Senior Member Ruff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Specter Arms View Post
    I would think that if "Glock Perfection" is an accurate slogan they would not need to put out a new generation every few months.
    I believe it's a goal for them, not a final statement.
    "All organizations that are not actually right-wing will over time become left-wing." --John O'Sullivan (1989)

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