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  1. #1
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    Tree planting/propagation methods

    This is a bit of a weird site, but he lists lots of ways for tree propagation, some species specific.

    http://www.twisted-tree.net/new-page-1/

    The third way he lists here seems to be a good method to transplant:

    PROPAGATION

    Butternuts are really easy to grow from seed. They need to be kept moist and cold during the winter, and they have to not be eaten by rodents. I achieve these conditions by burying my seed in buckets. The buckets are under ground to their full depth so that the lid of the bucket is even with the ground. I drill holes in the bottom and top of the bucket to allow rain and melting snow to pass through. I mix the butternuts with sand in the bucket. Snap the lid tight and cover with a layer of mulch. In the spring, the nuts can be planted out as soon as the ground thaws.

    They can be direct seeded at their permanent location or grown in a nursery. For direct seeding beware of squirrels that will pull up sprouted nuts. You may have to place a guard around the nut. If growing the seeds out in a nursery, you have 3 options. One option is to plant them into beds and dig them up after a growing season. This works fine so long as you have a deep enough soil to be able to easily dig up the tap rooted seedling. A second option is to raise them in pots. This is the worst option as you will have a tree with a circling root system most likely. You will also be stuck watering all summer.

    The third option is my new favorite. I plant butternuts into air pruned beds. These are raised beds that are suspended above the ground. The bottom of the bed is a sheet of galvanized hardware cloth. As the butternuts grow, they develop a tap root. When this tap root reaches through the hardware cloth, the tip dies. The response of the tree is remarkable. The entire length of the tap root bushes out. Numerous fibrous side roots develop in all directions. Trees grown this way transplant very well and are quite thick and strong after a single growing season. Of course, nothing compares to the root system of a direct seeded tree.

  2. #2
    The Gunsmithing Moderator blacksmithden's Avatar
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    I cheated and bought a few fruit trees for the yard. 3 apples and 2 pear trees. One of the pears died from some kind of black stuff growing on it's leaves, and the other is hanging on my a thread. The apples are doing pretty well though. I wish I didn't live in the city. I'd have a ton more planted. As it is, the yard is starting to get pretty crammed up with trees (including the non-fruit bearing kinds). I should probably rip out that other flaky pear and get some new ones. I also wish I didn't live so far north....otherwise there would be a few cherry trees planted too and maybe some grape vines.
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  3. #3
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    Maps says you’re in 3a/2b area. Poke around this site a bit:

    http://www.hardyfruittrees.ca/catalog/nut-tree

    They list a couple cherries and at least one grape that might work. If the grapes take, you’re set for awesome ice wine!

  4. #4
    The Gunsmithing Moderator blacksmithden's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIR VEYOR View Post
    Maps says you’re in 3a/2b area. Poke around this site a bit:

    http://www.hardyfruittrees.ca/catalog/nut-tree

    They list a couple cherries and at least one grape that might work. If the grapes take, you’re set for awesome ice wine!
    Thank you for that sir ! It's in my bookmarks now. I'll have a better look at it when I'm back up north.
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    Dealer/co-founder/co-owner of Tundra Supply Ltd.
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    The High River Gun Grab - NEVER FORGET !!!!
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  5. #5
    Super Moderator Rory McCanuck's Avatar
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    I thought this sounded like a whole bunch of work, until I realised it wasn't talking about butternut squash
    I put one of them in the corner of the garden this year, and it has taken over!
    Next year I'll put one or two along the fenceline instead.

    Will walnuts grow this far north?
    I know nothing about them, but I thought they were and Alabama, Georgia, Carolinas thing.
    Don't blame me, I didn't vote for that clown. Oct 20, '15

  6. #6
    Senior Member Grimlock's Avatar
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    There are certainly black walnuts in Southern Ontario, up to at least an hour north of hogtown. I know that's quite a bit south of most of the country. One interesting feature of them is they kill almost everything their root system touches.

  7. #7
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    Here’s the federal frost zone map. Fairly interactive. I think if you can find provincial ones, they’ll break it down a little better.

    http://www.agr.gc.ca/atlas/agpv?webm...0807d7817d34c2

  8. #8
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    Pretty happy with these guys:https://treetime.ca/index.php

  9. #9
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    I really meant to plant an apple tree this year. I was stupid not to. Between the price tags and moving the damn thing I just kept convincing myself I needed other stuff that was elsewhere in the store.

    Next year for sure. It's such a great investment!

    I'll have to check those sites out and find some other good food producing trees I can get away with. I love my Chinooks (Warm winds that come through from the west) but It's pretty deadly for a lot of certain plants!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hidyn View Post
    I really meant to plant an apple tree this year. I was stupid not to. Between the price tags and moving the damn thing I just kept convincing myself I needed other stuff that was elsewhere in the store.

    Next year for sure. It's such a great investment!

    I'll have to check those sites out and find some other good food producing trees I can get away with. I love my Chinooks (Warm winds that come through from the west) but It's pretty deadly for a lot of certain plants!

    Lots of heavily discounted things in the garden centres right now. Especially CT, grocery stores, Home Depot, etc.

    CT even includes a warranty. Apparently just dig it up and bring it in if it doesn’t take. So fresh tree for wintering a past it’s prime tree. So 70% off now, get top quality replacement later. Viable tree either way end result.

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