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  1. #11
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    Dixie's Japanese repro has been out of production for several years. Might find a used one. At the end, they sold off kits.
    A plain octagon barrel would work. Will this be a rifle or a smoothbore? Japanese originals were smooth.
    True seamless steel tubing has been successfully used for a lot of smoothbore ml barrels. Catch is, a lot of "seamless" tubing is finished so that it looks as if it wasn't made with a welded seam. Smooth finished inside and out, but there is a robotically welded full length seam. There is actual drawn seamless tube available.
    You mentioned 12L14. Leaded screw machine steel. Machines beautifully. A lot of ml barrels have been made from it. It has a tendency to be brittle.
    1137 is outstanding for ml rifled and smooth barrels.
    4140 has been used, but might be overkill. Popular for smokeless centerfire barrels.

  2. #12
    Junior Member Fuddislav's Avatar
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    Plain smooth octagon is what I have in mind.

  3. #13
    Junior Member Fuddislav's Avatar
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    Definitely going to purchase a commercial barrel, though I'm not certain how best to add the touch hole block pictured in the reference photographs I've been sourcing. Are commercial barrels soft tempered and safe to weld on or do I risk altering their strength?

    https://imgur.com/lKBzIph

    Other photos:
    https://imgur.com/a/BVf0lYY

  4. #14
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    Easiest way to attach the flashpan is to soft solder it in place.

  5. #15
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    There are several routs you can go depending on your bugget.
    You can buy a new barrel or get a used barrel. Now comes the Big warning. Do not use CVA barrels. The reason is that they come from Spain and Spain has NO restrictions on barrel steel/quality. I have seen more than my fair share of split CVA barrels and blown out nipples and bolsters so do your self a favor and if you see the word Spain, run.

    Most barrels are made of 4140 steel. Yes you can certainly weld it however I strongly suggest using only mig or tig welding. Stick welding has the nasty habit of allowing rust to form around the welds and most importantly on the inside of the barrel making it just a bit harder to clean and in many cases if you leave the rifle dirty, this is the first place your nasty corosion will start.
    Hope this is helpfull.

  6. #16
    Junior Member Fuddislav's Avatar
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    I've heard bad things about CVA, yeah.

    Thinking about something like this if they ship to Canada, failing that Mark of the Wolf for sure ships. https://www.muzzleloaderbuilderssupp...L541536S&xm=on

  7. #17
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    Just out of curiosity, I did a google for welding 4140 steel. Interesting. Certainly do-able, but hardly worth the bother for attaching a flashpan.
    4130 is commonly used for centerfire rifle barrels. There are a few muzzleloading barrel makers who use 4140. Primarily for percussion rifles firing elongated bullets, where extra strength is desired. You may have trouble finding a plain octagon smoothbore blank.
    1137 is a preferred steel. Green Mountain uses it.
    A number of ml barrel makers use 12L14. There are pros and cons. Machines beautifully. Low elasticity; if it fails, it can break into pieces, not just bulge or split.

  8. #18
    Junior Member Fuddislav's Avatar
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    I think brazing might be just the ticket, but I will check with the suppliers for their thoughts.

  9. #19
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    I have not had the opportunity of closely examining a Japanese matchlock. Don't know how the flashpans were attached to the barrels. I've never seen construction drawings of one.
    European made matchlocks often had the pan set in a longitudinal dovetail cut into the side flat of the barrel.

  10. #20
    Junior Member Fuddislav's Avatar
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    It looks like this one that I'm using as reference was forged as one piece, but a mechanical join would probably work.

    Last edited by Fuddislav; 09-17-2018 at 07:03 PM.

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