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  1. #11
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    use coat hanger, the world's most under rated construction material, 1/4 steel rod is very difficult to manipulate and much overkill

  2. #12
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    That is more or less how they measure trigger weight for ISSF matches ( Olympic shooting events ).
    Lift the gun with weight slowly, the trigger must not break, then they give the gun a jerk to make sure the trigger still work ( in case someone cheat by somehow locking/blocking the trigger from breaking).

  3. The Following 2 Users Like This Post By wai556

    RobertMcC (09-14-2018), Stew (09-15-2018)

  4. #13
    Member Barlow Knife's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stew View Post
    use coat hanger, the world's most under rated construction material, 1/4 steel rod is very difficult to manipulate and much overkill
    Coat hangers are too flimsy for the task. Hanging 4 pounds off a bent coat hanger just causes it to bend, which is exactly what you don't want. Bending soft 1/4" steel rod is easy since most people have access to a bench vise and a few basic hand tools like vise grips, a crescent wrench, and a ball peen hammer. But, 3/16" (5 mm) rod would work just fine.

    It also depends what you have in mind. I pictured a rod with an "L" bend with a 3" long horizontal section entering the trigger guard, possibly with a round notch filed in it to keep it in place on the trigger. A smaller "L" bend or "U" at the bottom gives you a place to hang the weight-holding receptacle or fixture.
    Last edited by Barlow Knife; 09-15-2018 at 03:26 AM.

  5. #14
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    hmm, seems Alberta has much weaker steel available

  6. #15
    Senior Member RobertMcC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stew View Post
    hmm, seems Alberta has much weaker steel available
    Must be using the white plastic coated ones and not the thicker gold ish color ones.
    When the rich wage war, It's the poor who die.

  7. #16
    Member Barlow Knife's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stew View Post
    hmm, seems Alberta has much weaker steel available
    As a person who has worked with his hands all his life, I stand by my remarks. Any wire coat hanger is really too flexible for the task, and it is very easy to work with soft 1/4" steel rod (not music wire hardness).

    So why not just do it properly?

    But, to each his own.

  8. #17
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    1/4 inch round stock is NOT easy to work with, as someone who has worked with his hands for over 60 years, I know this but I'd love to see you bend a 1.5 " section to 90' with vice grips and a vice and then put a hook on the other end

  9. #18
    Senior Member RobertMcC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stew View Post
    1/4 inch round stock is NOT easy to work with, as someone who has worked with his hands for over 60 years, I know this but I'd love to see you bend a 1.5 " section to 90' with vice grips and a vice and then put a hook on the other end
    1/4" is kinda over kill, 3/16 is all you would need.
    When the rich wage war, It's the poor who die.

  10. #19
    Member Barlow Knife's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stew View Post
    1/4 inch round stock is NOT easy to work with, as someone who has worked with his hands for over 60 years, I know this but I'd love to see you bend a 1.5 " section to 90' with vice grips and a vice and then put a hook on the other end
    I've done it with various projects many times, and I also mentioned a ball peen hammer in my previous post.

    You cut the rod to an approximate length, put 1 1/2" in the vise with the remainder sticking out the side horizontally, and then strike that remainder near the vise with the aforementioned ball peen hammer, until you have a 90 degree angle. (bend towards the front of the vise)

    For the hook, bent about a 1" length on the other end to 90 degrees in the same fashion with the hammer.

    Then place the body of the rod in the vise vertically with about 1" exposed and the 1" bent portion horizontal above the vise.

    Then tap the end of the 1" bent portion downward until you have a 45 degree angle, resulting in a simple hook. You can close that hook still further if you wish by squeezing it in the vise.

    A few strokes with a file to clean up and you're done. Very basic work with a bench vise, ball peen hammer, and/or vise grips if you use 3/16" rod.

    I don't know why you seem to be making such an easy project seem difficult when anybody who has ever used basic home hand tools could easily do it.

    I was doing such things when I was 12 years old.

    However, there are many ways to make or improvise such a weight type gauge.
    And any further time and energy spent debating over what diameter of rod to use seems silly.
    Last edited by Barlow Knife; 09-17-2018 at 06:12 AM.

  11. The Following User Liked This Post By Barlow Knife

    Stew (09-17-2018)

  12. #20
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    agreed

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