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Candychikita
03-03-2014, 11:04 AM
i must say, the timing of this was very well done. crisis in the ukraine, and the oscar weekend...way to get this buried in the news at the bottom...

Haywire1
03-03-2014, 11:55 AM
ok, with the amount of anger( completely deserved) some of the threads are going way off topic. feel free to discuss all the off topic reasoning etc in here. the topic is off topic, regarding the latest efforts by the RCMP to disarm us. Stay on the civil side please.

I want to add something, I agree with Candy. The timing of the prohibitions smells. Late in the evening, and right before the weekend. no real chance for the Govt to respond other than a quick statement. Guarantees the Govt winds up with egg on their face. Also with the Ukraine flaring up, everyone could see that going bad in a hurry, not much of a stretch to assume the RCMP timed it for when the Govt was also guaranteed to be tied up with that mess.

Foxer
03-03-2014, 12:09 PM
i must say, the timing of this was very well done. crisis in the ukraine, and the oscar weekend...way to get this buried in the news at the bottom...
This ain't their first rodeo :) They also like to pull it on newer ministers, because they haven't settled into their portfolio yet.

Candychikita
03-03-2014, 01:04 PM
ok haywire, sorry to derail. moved foxer's and my comments here.

Redbearded1
03-03-2014, 01:04 PM
The whole situation just seems like there is a big puzzle piece missing. Like we aren't getting the full story. Maybe its just because we were blindsided but I feel like I need to be watching out for the next blow to come our way.

It makes me even more curious as to what the NFA was talking about with the whole "CFO's getting wings clipped" tease.

RobSmith
03-03-2014, 01:16 PM
At the end of the day the RCMP is acting within the sphere of "discretionary powers" granted to them by law. It's no secret that they are pretty openly at war with the CPC so it's quite likely that this move was deliberate. Quite surprised so far that the other parties have not moved in and issued statements (of the usual "taking dangerous assault weapons that the Conservatives have allowed in off the streets" kind...) on the matter yet.

Carguy2550
03-03-2014, 01:31 PM
I have one idea as to why this may have happened. If the CFO's were getting their wings clipped perhaps there were other changes the RCMP got wind of coming down the pipe. This may their last kick at the cat before any rumored changes occur and they no longer have the resources and ability to continue on thier anti-gun, anti-freedom, make everyone a comfortable tax slave agenda.

Haywire1
03-03-2014, 01:57 PM
no worries Candy. like I said, with the Ukraine, etc. somethings awfully smelly here

Prairie Dog
03-03-2014, 02:06 PM
What if the RCMP say "NO" to any changes the CPoC make over this latest round of bull? What if they flat out refuse to conform to any new legislation?

Is it even possible for them to do that?

Rory McCanuck
03-03-2014, 02:24 PM
You mean like continuing to require all data to be kept in a register after the demise of the LGR?

http://www.parseerror.com/images/moments/inconceivable/pics/inconceivable-1-orig.jpg

Prairie Dog
03-03-2014, 02:36 PM
You mean like continuing to require all data to be kept in a register after the demise of the LGR?

http://www.parseerror.com/images/moments/inconceivable/pics/inconceivable-1-orig.jpg

Uh huh

FALover
03-03-2014, 02:39 PM
What if the RCMP say "NO" to any changes the CPoC make over this latest round of bull? What if they flat out refuse to conform to any new legislation?

Is it even possible for them to do that?

In a police state it is not only possible it is expected. Do you expect more of the same from the RCMP? Welcome to the Democratic Peoples Republic of Canada. Maybe Quebec was right to want to separate from the upcoming chitstorm.

Ben
03-03-2014, 04:46 PM
At the end of the day the RCMP is acting within the sphere of "discretionary powers" granted to them by law. It's no secret that they are pretty openly at war with the CPC so it's quite likely that this move was deliberate. Quite surprised so far that the other parties have not moved in and issued statements (of the usual "taking dangerous assault weapons that the Conservatives have allowed in off the streets" kind...) on the matter yet.

Bingo.

Rory McCanuck
03-03-2014, 05:09 PM
At the end of the day the RCMP is acting within the sphere of "discretionary powers" granted to them by law.
And that's really the problem, isn't it? They'll keep at it as long as they can.

It's no secret that they are pretty openly at war with the CPC so it's quite likely that this move was deliberate. Quite surprised so far that the other parties have not moved in and issued statements (of the usual "taking dangerous assault weapons that the Conservatives have allowed in off the streets" kind...) on the matter yet.
Justine's handlers and Tommy the Commie are too astute to be associated with it in any way, I'd think. As soon as they made some stupid comment the Cons would counter with "So you have no problem with unelected civil servants seizing legally owned private property?" A hot potato none of them would want to touch.

Strewth
03-03-2014, 06:19 PM
Justine's handlers and Tommy the Commie are too astute to be associated with it in any way, I'd think. As soon as they made some stupid comment the Cons would counter with "So you have no problem with unelected civil servants seizing legally owned private property?" A hot potato none of them would want to touch.

I have faith that JT will slip over the garden fence on a rope of knotted bed sheets, and let us all know how we should be reacting to this:).

mechanic1908
03-03-2014, 07:36 PM
I have no idea if its related or not, but my local Canadian Tire was told by the Police to take all the Mossberg 715T's off the shelf and make them "Not for sale".
That was this past Wednesday when this happened AFAIK.

Foxer
03-03-2014, 08:03 PM
I have no idea if its related or not, but my local Canadian Tire was told by the Police to take all the Mossberg 715T's off the shelf and make them "Not for sale".
That was this past Wednesday when this happened AFAIK.

Jezuz - if they try to claim THAT is an ar-variant they're going to get sued for libel by colt :)

Rory McCanuck
03-03-2014, 08:39 PM
Aren't those the ones that the letter went out to stores about?
If they came in for warranty with 25 round mags, they were returned with 10 rounders.
Think that's them, anyhoo.

Here's one link discussing them:
http://www.mossbergowners.com/forum/index.php?threads/canadian-715t-owners-about-to-get-the-shaft.10752/

Waterloomike
03-03-2014, 08:45 PM
Question:

Has anyone ever seen a $3k - $4k rifle anywhere on any street?

Maybe Switzerland?

but never in Canada.

the whole 'off the street' claim is complete and utter bull.

It's a boogie man story to scare people with child like minds and low IQs.

Strewth
03-04-2014, 12:03 AM
^The same street that is full of "converted autos". Hide yer chillens.

"Hey look! A $4000 semi-auto .223! I'm going to get me one of those right after I machine the trigger group and the inside of this receiver!" said no gang-banger ever.

Foxer
03-04-2014, 12:07 AM
"Hey look! A $4000 semi-auto .223! I'm going to get me one of those right after I machine the trigger group and the inside of this receiver!" said no gang-banger ever.

ROFLMAO :) :)

Waterloomike
03-04-2014, 07:13 AM
^The same street that is full of "converted autos". Hide yer chillens.

"Hey look! A $4000 semi-auto .223! I'm going to get me one of those right after I machine the trigger group and the inside of this receiver!" said no gang-banger ever.

Exactly.

The same with all the raids where they stole those old guys guns based on lapsed licensing in T.O.. They called that 'taking guns off the streets', when they were locked in safes and closets.

What a smelly steaming agendized pile these bs artists are pushing.

This crap has to end.

Ben
03-04-2014, 07:15 AM
Question:

Has anyone ever seen a $3k - $4k rifle anywhere on any street?

Maybe Switzerland?

but never in Canada.

the whole 'off the street' claim is complete and utter bull.

It's a boogie man story to scare people with child like minds and low IQs.

Not "Maybe", but rather "Definitely". It's the service rifle that is given to all reserve members to be kept in their home. Foreever.

It's that silly concept to trust your own, because being a Direct Democracy, any elected official is always on their tippy toes to not screw up and pass a law that can be recalled via a referendum (requires 50k signature in just over 3 months for it to pass and be called up for national vote).

Waterloomike
03-04-2014, 07:21 AM
Not "Maybe", but rather "Definitely". It's the service rifle that is given to all reserve members to be kept in their home. Foreever.

It's that silly concept to trust your own, because being a Direct Democracy, any elected official is always on their tippy toes to not screw up and pass a law that can be recalled via a referendum (requires 50k signature in just over 3 months for it to pass and be called up for national vote).

Yeah, that's pretty much common knowledge. but how many have seen it? I've never been close to Europe.

Candychikita
03-04-2014, 10:40 AM
Yeah, that's pretty much common knowledge. but how many have seen it? I've never been close to Europe.

I never saw any firearms waltzing around in the streets in Switzerland when I was there. Then again, they have breathtaking views, trolley cars and excellent chocolate - I could have been sufficiently distracted. Highly doubt it, but there is a possibility.

Waterloomike
03-04-2014, 11:23 AM
I never saw any firearms waltzing around in the streets in Switzerland when I was there. Then again, they have breathtaking views, trolley cars and excellent chocolate - I could have been sufficiently distracted. Highly doubt it, but there is a possibility.

http://bunkerville.files.wordpress.com/2011/01/swiss2.jpg?w=500&h=365

http://americablog.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/gun-nut-jc-penney-utah.jpg

http://www.nraila.org/media/2419403/HALBSCAN.gif

Ben
03-05-2014, 07:29 AM
I never saw any firearms waltzing around in the streets in Switzerland when I was there. Then again, they have breathtaking views, trolley cars and excellent chocolate - I could have been sufficiently distracted. Highly doubt it, but there is a possibility.

Simply google "Switzerland firearm public carry" for images and you'll see many results.

Ben
03-05-2014, 07:31 AM
Yeah, that's pretty much common knowledge. but how many have seen it? I've never been close to Europe.

Even if it's only one individual in all of Switzerland that exercise that right then the point is made. I often get ask "well if it's legal why isn't everyone doing it". It's pretty simple - because they have the freedom to decide and exercise that right.

Waterloomike
03-05-2014, 07:37 AM
Even if it's only one individual in all of Switzerland that exercise that right then the point is made. I often get ask "well if it's legal why isn't everyone doing it". It's pretty simple - because they have the freedom to decide and exercise that right.

I won't put any money on it, but iirc, it's a Right as well as an occasional obligation in Switzerland.

Funny, but blood never runs in Swiss streets.

It only seems to happen in the self proclaimed centre of the universe.

awndray
03-05-2014, 08:42 AM
Should the federal government strip the RCMP of the power to reclassify guns?
Yes
60%

No
40%

VOTERS
1837
http://www.sunnewsnetwork.ca/

Rory McCanuck
03-05-2014, 12:07 PM
Should the federal government strip the RCMP of the power to reclassify guns?
Yes
88%
No
12%
VOTERS
7568

762shooter
03-10-2014, 09:13 PM
ok, with the amount of anger( completely deserved) some of the threads are going way off topic. feel free to discuss all the off topic reasoning etc in here. the topic is off topic, regarding the latest efforts by the RCMP to disarm us. Stay on the civil side please.

I want to add something, I agree with Candy. The timing of the prohibitions smells. Late in the evening, and right before the weekend. no real chance for the Govt to respond other than a quick statement. Guarantees the Govt winds up with egg on their face. Also with the Ukraine flaring up, everyone could see that going bad in a hurry, not much of a stretch to assume the RCMP timed it for when the Govt was also guaranteed to be tied up with that mess.

Plus Paulson about to go on a paternity leave for who knows how long, plus less than a year and a half from the next election

762shooter
03-10-2014, 09:16 PM
The whole situation just seems like there is a big puzzle piece missing. Like we aren't getting the full story. Maybe its just because we were blindsided but I feel like I need to be watching out for the next blow to come our way.

It makes me even more curious as to what the NFA was talking about with the whole "CFO's getting wings clipped" tease.

If you are wondering, have a look here: http://static.globalnews.ca/content/interactives/documents/general_news_bucket/A-2012-00068.PDF For instance check out Section 6 AR 15 family of firearms. They consider a Ruger SR22 a variant of an AR 15!

762shooter
03-10-2014, 09:18 PM
At the end of the day the RCMP is acting within the sphere of "discretionary powers" granted to them by law. It's no secret that they are pretty openly at war with the CPC so it's quite likely that this move was deliberate. Quite surprised so far that the other parties have not moved in and issued statements (of the usual "taking dangerous assault weapons that the Conservatives have allowed in off the streets" kind...) on the matter yet.

But you know, the F/A does not explicitly grand authority to reclassify firearms to the RCMP, they have just taken the authority upon themselves..

harbl_the_cat
03-11-2014, 12:43 PM
I've said this before - but the timing and execution of this ban is WILL make this issue a election issue.

Que Bueno? Definitely the Liberal Party of Canada.

Being cognizant of regional politics, it's interesting to note that it is public knowledge that the owners of the majority of 858's and in all probability, the Swiss Arms, are most highly concentrated in Conservative areas of support. Just look at this chart of CZ858 ownership in 2012.

This might as well be the chart of Conservative held electoral seats in the last election:

http://public.tableausoftware.com/static/images/cz/cz858/cz858dashboard/1_rss.png

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/60/Canada_2011_Federal_Election.svg/1084px-Canada_2011_Federal_Election.svg.png

I've been extremely critical of the CPC in the past as well as the Federal government in it's entirety - but what is maddening about this is how the RCMP is officially a political lobbyist organization - and regardless of my disdain and dissatisfaction with the Tory party, this is even bigger than that.

This is the fundamental corruption of Canadian society in it's entirety.

It really doesn't surprise me. I've been saying this for years.

Camo tung
03-11-2014, 12:47 PM
^ Doesn't surprise me that the graph in the above post (supplied by the RCMP?) titles the CZ 858 as an "assault rifle".

harbl_the_cat
03-11-2014, 01:23 PM
^ Doesn't surprise me that the graph in the above post (supplied by the RCMP?) titles the CZ 858 as an "assault rifle".

I was thinking that too.

Candychikita
03-11-2014, 10:44 PM
Hmm. Interesting. My instructor in one of my law courses posted this interesting article:

http://www.thestar.com/news/insight/2014/03/04/criminal_cases_plunge_across_toronto.html?app=noRe direct


The benches in youth bail court look like pews in a church. People sit in clusters — young people with their relatives, lawyers, friends — all praying for a favourable outcome.

On a Monday in late February, there is room to spare on the benches at the bail court at 311 Jarvis St. Two girls in dangling earrings and hoodies whisper in the back row. Across the aisle, a boy, slim, his head down, sits next to his parents as his lawyer translates the proceedings into Mandarin. A few other knots of people are scattered among the rows. One bench is completely empty.

About 45 minutes into the hearings, the judge calls for a recess. There is no one left to come before the court.

It will reconvene later that morning, when more youth arrive — if they arrive.

In youth and adult courts across Toronto in 2013, there was a significant drop in new criminal cases, a Star analysis of Ontario Court of Justice statistics shows.

Criminal cases received in Ontario courts, excluding Toronto, dropped 5.8 per cent between December 2012 and December 2013. In Toronto, cases received dropped by more than twice that, 12.8 per cent.
Photos View photos

Defence lawyer Simon King outside the provincial youth court at 311 Jarvis St. zoom

In Toronto youth courts the decline is especially steep. Where 2012 saw a 7.1 per cent decrease, in 2013 cases dropped by 25.5 per cent. Youth cases in Ontario, excluding Toronto, fell by 18.5 per cent in 2013.

“It’s not normal, it’s clearly not normal,” says Simon King, a criminal defence lawyer who specializes in youth cases. “It’s happening across the city in every court, I’m told.”

In Toronto, something unique may be afoot, say lawyers and others who believe the decrease may have much to do with a dramatic reduction in “carding” — the controversial police practice of stopping and documenting citizens without, necessarily, the intention of making an arrest. Often, the stops involve a pat-down search.

The criminal case drop-off began in October, and the number of new cases entering the system remains low today.

Very few carding encounters result in criminal charges, but some do. If police conduct far fewer “proactive” stops, they are less likely to find drugs or — after running names through police computers — breaches of conditions that would result in criminal cases being generated.

To be sure, across the province, crime is down, police budgets are under the microscope, there are hiring freezes and officers may be showing more discretion in who they choose to charge.

There were drops in cases in other urban Ontario centres that were comparable to the decrease in Toronto. It is difficult to make comparisons, with so many factors at play.

Carding in Toronto has in recent years been the subject of an ongoing Star investigation, and the ensuing criticism and discussion at the Toronto Police Services Board and within the police service has resulted in an overhaul of how officers interact with the public.

Instances of carding fell more than 75 per cent in July, the Star reported last year, after Toronto police were ordered to issue a receipt for every police-initiated stop. In October, Police Chief Bill Blair put an end to the receipt system, but the carding rate has remained low.

It apparently dropped off even more after that, a source told the Star.

Mike McCormack, president of the Toronto Police Association, agrees that some of the drop in criminal cases can be attributed to the decrease in carding but says there are multiple factors at play, including officer discretion, growing pains associated with a new computer system, a drop in overall crime and fewer hours available for proactive policing.

Officers, he says, are suffering low morale — “I’d say it’s close to a tipping point; it’s very low right now” — as a result of negative press about carding and other issues. Officers are also concerned that contact cards will be used to gauge racial bias by individual officers.

While there is no official work-to-rule campaign underway regarding carding, McCormack says “there’s definitely a sense out there amongst my members that they don’t want to be the one that’s, quite frankly, on the cover of the Star.”

Toronto Deputy Police Chief Peter Sloly acknowledges a drop in carding is one factor in the drop in new criminal cases. In an interview this week he said carding has actually dropped 90 per cent compared to this time last year.

But he says the drop in cases has more to do with greater crime-prevention efforts, staffing issues and the rollout late last year of the new case management computer system that took officers off the street for training. The service is also in a state of major change, which is having an affect on numbers, says Sloly.

To see a drop in criminal cases fits with the service’s overall plan, he says.

“We’re not surprised, quite frankly, to see the court cases similarly reduced in numbers,” says Sloly.

In a city where police are suffering a loss of public confidence over the handling of the G20 Summit, the shooting death of Sammy Yatim and a proposed class-action lawsuit and mass human-rights complaint alleging racial profiling, a decrease in police stops of citizens that are perceived to be without reason, and, in the words of one defence lawyer, a drop in “poochy” — or minor — criminal cases, may be a good thing.

If it lasts, police may regain some of the confidence that has been lost, says University of Toronto criminologist Scot Wortley. Another possible consequence, says Wortley and others, could be a more efficient criminal justice system.

“I think there could be some very positive impacts with respect to the cost of justice, and with respect to the speed of processing within the criminal justice system,” says Wortley.

With carding down, it remains unclear if police are actually stopping people less. As well, police are no longer filling out actual contact cards, a move that happened last year. Instead, they are making notes of encounters in their notebooks and selectively transferring details from some stops into a contact card database.

Personal details collected in these encounters and on the now abandoned contact cards — more than 1.8 million cards, involving more than a million individuals, were filled out between 2008 and 2012 — become part of a database that police, investigating crimes, use to search for suspects, possible witnesses and connections. A Star analysis shows that one in 10 people carded has also faced at least one arrest during that period.

Black people are more likely than white people to be carded in each of the city’s 70-plus patrol zones, according to a Star analysis.

Police make note of the reason for the interactions on the contact cards, which the service is now calling “community safety notes.” The most common reasons cited include “general investigation,” “suspicious activity” or a traffic stop.

Whatever the explanation, there is no doubt that fewer people are ending up in Toronto courtrooms.

Emma Rhodes, a defence lawyer and adjunct professor of law at the University of Toronto, says her caseload is down, “I would say, 50 per cent.” She says the drop in carding is the reason.

“I think the police aren’t carding as much and so there aren’t as many detentions, which means there’s not as many investigations. It’s decreasing the amount of arrests,” says Rhodes. “It’s been a really cold winter so I think that’s affected arrest rates as well.”

It’s not just in the youth courts that cases are down. The data show notable drops in cases occurring in every Toronto court between October and December of 2013.

“You go to the adult courts and it used to be that they were very busy and now you go at 10 o’clock and the halls are dead,” says Rhodes.

Cases where charges are laid but are diverted from a trial process are not a factor in the drops. Such cases are included in cases-received statistics, said a spokesperson for the Ministry of the Attorney General

Toronto’s decline in new criminal cases seems out of step with the provincial statistic. In fact, the 2013 drops in Toronto — for all cases and for youth cases — represent the single biggest one-year decreases in five years.

“I’ve seen that there’s been a dramatic … drop in youth that are being arrested and charged,” says defence lawyer Sergio Giacomini, who represents many youth with charges at 311 Jarvis.

“I can also say that my caseload is more serious offences too now, which begs the question, has the new protocol of carding affected things? I think it probably has.”

“We don’t see as many cases which are police-generated, police officers actually seeing the offence,” says Giacomini. “It’s more the call comes in, there’s been a robbery; the call comes in, there’s been an assault; the call comes in, there’s been a threat or a theft. It’s generated outside the police.”

Reid Rusonik, a criminal defence lawyer, believes the drop may have everything to do with budget constraints and fewer “cop man hours” on the street. “More cop hours would equal more arrests and charges,” he says.

Defence lawyer King suggests that the load of paperwork involved in a new computer system, which organizes the information and disclosure material necessary for prosecution through the courts, may be affecting incoming cases.

“It seems like that process has gotten a lot longer and a lot more time-consuming for the officers,” says King. “So whether that gives them less time to make arrests, or whether that just means that they would prefer not to make an arrest where it’s a minor thing and they could exercise their discretion, I’m not sure which of those it is, or if it’s both.”

According to King, carding “certainly contributed a fair amount of what we call ‘poochy charges’ — a marijuana possession for instance, something that’s small.”

A poochy charge, he says, is one in which the resources devoted to processing the charge far outweigh the severity of the crime, and the impact that a finding of guilt will have on a young person’s future. “Between the lawyers, crowns, courts, and police, that’s a lot over a gram of marijuana,” says King.

Rhodes, King and Giacomini all view a reduction in cases as a benefit for their clients, many of whom feel the brunt of carding because they live in low-income, heavily policed neighbourhoods.

“It’s not a bad thing if the drop in numbers is because of carding,” says Giacomini, who says he has seen many instances where carding lead to charter violations: arbitrary detention and unreasonable search.

With fewer questionable stops, Giacomini says there would be fewer cases of evidence being tossed “because there was an arbitrary detention, and based on what grounds? Just hanging around in the wrong area.

“That’s our argument all the time: Why? Why was he stopped?”

There remain many questions and theories as to what is behind the drops in carding and new criminal cases.

“I’ve been doing this for about 10 years and I’ve never seen it like this before,” says defence lawyer King. “Maybe everybody’s just being better behaved. It strikes me as unlikely.”

Drop in criminal offenses, enough so that it is hurting criminal lawyers and is so noticeable the courthouse is empty by noon? Is there a quota of arrests the police need to make to maintain their budgets?

Hmm. 12,000 new criminals with the click of a mouse.

Waterloomike
03-12-2014, 05:51 AM
This is the first I've heard of carding.

But I am not at all surprised.

It is good to hear of it being suspended.

Carguy2550
03-13-2014, 12:15 AM
This "carding" stinks alot like New York City and their stop and frisk policy. Good thing it has stopped...for now.

infidel29
03-13-2014, 10:39 PM
You mean like continuing to require all data to be kept in a register after the demise of the LGR?

http://www.parseerror.com/images/moments/inconceivable/pics/inconceivable-1-orig.jpg

right, because that would NEVER happen :tounge:

infidel29
03-13-2014, 10:41 PM
Jezuz - if they try to claim THAT is an ar-variant they're going to get sued for libel by colt :)

I hope they do. I'm sure Colt has the lawyers and resources to make them sweat.

infidel29
03-13-2014, 10:42 PM
Question:

Has anyone ever seen a $3k - $4k rifle anywhere on any street?

Maybe Switzerland?

but never in Canada.

the whole 'off the street' claim is complete and utter bull.

It's a boogie man story to scare people with child like minds and low IQs.

a street gun may COST $4000 to buy illegally, but it would likely be worth 1/4 of that in retail value

Waterloomike
03-14-2014, 05:28 AM
a street gun may COST $4000 to buy illegally, but it would likely be worth 1/4 of that in retail value

I read in some toronto paper that they rent them for a hefty price.

Foxer
03-14-2014, 08:15 AM
I read in some toronto paper that they rent them for a hefty price.

I remember that - it was quite a big deal in the media about 10 years ago, criminals were renting a gun, doing their drive by, giving it back, that kind of thing :) Apparently it was a big business according to the cops. I'm mildly curious what the 'walkaround' was like when you gave it back :) "Well it looks in order.... Heeeeey, what's this scratch here?" And presumably if you don't return it with a full magazine they charge you for filling it up :)

Waterloomike
03-14-2014, 08:24 AM
I remember that - it was quite a big deal in the media about 10 years ago, criminals were renting a gun, doing their drive by, giving it back, that kind of thing :) Apparently it was a big business according to the cops. I'm mildly curious what the 'walkaround' was like when you gave it back :) "Well it looks in order.... Heeeeey, what's this scratch here?" And presumably if you don't return it with a full magazine they charge you for filling it up :)

I read it more recently. within the last year. I think it may have been the National Post or Mop and pail.

I dunno, but imho renting guns for crime is not a gun culture. It's just a gangster culture.

Foxer
03-14-2014, 09:01 AM
I dunno, but imho renting guns for crime is not a gun culture. It's just a gangster culture.

Well obviously. Just like selling illegal drugs is hardly a 'medical culture'. Or that using a getaway car is part of the 'automotive culture'.

Waterloomike
03-14-2014, 09:12 AM
Well obviously. Just like selling illegal drugs is hardly a 'medical culture'. Or that using a getaway car is part of the 'automotive culture'.

Yeah, it's obvious to you, but to all the cbc bots, it's whatever the boob tube tells them it is.

harbl_the_cat
03-14-2014, 09:21 AM
I recall reading in one of the big propaganda syndicates how a lot of gangs were stashing guns in public places so as to completely dodge possession charges in the event their residence was raided.

Very smart idea, too. Gives access to everyone in their gang AND confounds the police/courts.

Of course that only means unsafe storage and possession without a license only apply to people who actually keep guns in their homes (i.e. - the people doing so with without nefarious intent.) meaning we as gun owners have the Tories to thank for the mandatory minimum sentence we would receive when the police raid our homes.

Foxer
03-14-2014, 09:35 AM
Yeah, it's obvious to you, but to all the cbc bots, it's whatever the boob tube tells them it is.

Yes, but I have a brain. Makes all the difference.

Waterloomike
03-14-2014, 10:40 AM
Yes, but I have a brain. Makes all the difference.

Agreed.

That's the difference. Goes without saying.

Edenchef
03-14-2014, 11:23 AM
Yes, but I have a brain. Makes all the difference.

And that, Foxer. Puts you way outside of the CBC target audience.

Cheers!

Strewth
03-14-2014, 12:26 PM
... mandatory minimum sentence we would receive when the police raid our homes.

Repealed in November, 2013.

infidel29
03-15-2014, 04:01 PM
Yes, but I have a brain. Makes all the difference.

Ah, but those are in short supply on the planet, didnt ya know?

Foxer
03-15-2014, 04:33 PM
Ah, but those are in short supply on the planet, didnt ya know?

well they didn't used to be, but the 'voluntary surrender' program the libs ran was wildly successful. "Join the libs, turn in your brain, and receive a free cell phone (with 3 year activation)"

Grizz
03-15-2014, 05:44 PM
How long until they try to go after the AR. Or the SR-22 I just picked up last month!!!

Hopefully the CPC will stand by their word and re-vamp everything firearms related so law abiding citizens are not treated as guilty until they can prove their innocence!!


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Tactical72
03-15-2014, 06:53 PM
If the ban the SR-22, they will have to ban the 10/22 as a variant. From what I understand, (correct me if I am wrong) the 10/22 is the most popular .22 in North America. I'd guess banning it would create a few hundred thousand new criminals. That would create an uprising for the ages.

Grizz
03-15-2014, 06:55 PM
I hope you're right but I heard that the SR-22 was on their list as well.

Maybe someone "more in the know" can confirm this. I also heard the AR is on the block too


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Steveo9mm
03-15-2014, 07:28 PM
I kinda wish a zombie apocolypse would happen... Then all this nonsense would be moot

Tactical72
03-15-2014, 08:58 PM
I kinda wish a zombie apocolypse would happen... Then all this nonsense would be moot

New law; Anti gunners may not be in possession of firearms during the zombie apocalypse. 😜

Grizz
03-16-2014, 12:23 AM
Let's send them out first to extend the branch of peace via discussion and interpretive non confrontational dance


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Waterloomike
03-16-2014, 05:07 AM
Let's send them out first to extend the branch of peace via discussion and interpretive non confrontational dance


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That'll work.

Edenchef
03-16-2014, 12:37 PM
Let's send them out first to extend the branch of peace via discussion and interpretive non confrontational dance

Perfect......They have no brain to have eaten or to reanimate them.

Cheers!