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pitw
04-07-2014, 08:38 AM
Being a bit of a cheap plick and liking good food I never pass up a chance at free food. A feedlot owner I have made into a good friend called yesterday morning saying a heifer had calved and come get the sucker. The boys and I took off and they had to walk through the pen looking.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Kids%20and%20critters/IMG_0528_zps0ffff264.jpg

They came out with this little girl and were also a bit miffed that they found 2 others that had been tramped to death.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Kids%20and%20critters/IMG_0530_zpscf14156c.jpg

She looks a mite better this morning.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Kids%20and%20critters/IMG_0534_zps7909a27a.jpg

Last years calf from the same feedlot and the cow that raised it is in the background. She will raise three again this year as Don uses one for 4H and we eat one.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Kids%20and%20critters/IMG_0526_zpsc8ffbdce.jpg

Prepping to us is just living normally and enjoying the fruits of nature.

BrotherRockeye
04-07-2014, 09:57 AM
That's the way to do it!
The last 2 bottle babies here were raised by my kids. Once I showed them how to mix the milk replacer they were set. When the calves got bigger I made a holder for the bottle because the kids got tired of getting bunted around at feeding time lol.
I just cut a hole in the bottom of a coffee can big enough for the nipple to go through and put a bungy across the other end.
I mounted it on an angle at the right height and it was a matter of dropping the bottle into it and putting the bungy across the bottom to hold it there and make it bunt back.

Big Galoot
04-07-2014, 03:48 PM
Tough time of year to keep mud and crap off of them.( Referring to the feedlot ).
When it comes to the rare bottle I have here I really relish feeding time. If it were not for me and the replacer this calf would not be alive, and when you bring one around that was scoured and down - nothing better.
Thanks for the post.

BrotherRockeye
04-07-2014, 05:32 PM
This thread brought back some fond memories of when my kids were small. I like raisin young ones...kids or critters, doesn't matter which. It's like starting a colt and making good headway.
Anywho, thought I'd share a pic of my daughters first bottle project... a little heifer calf, and her old dog.
http://i159.photobucket.com/albums/t138/parklandtack/AlIceampNancy_zpsee11d934.jpg

pitw
04-07-2014, 05:57 PM
Great pic and thanks for sharing it with us. She looks terrified of the animal, eh. Kids who get to be around critters learn something they can learn no other way.

BrotherRockeye
04-07-2014, 06:42 PM
It's the truth.
I think people in general could benefit from a little animal husbandry.
Nothing quite like waking up to the sound of the back door opening and finding your 3 year old in her jammies and rubber boots feeding a calf...or colt.
She's a crafty one, used to pack crackers for them lol
http://i159.photobucket.com/albums/t138/parklandtack/AlampRosie_zps8c1e9397.jpg

pitw
04-07-2014, 07:26 PM
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Kids%20and%20critters/kidsandcritters016.jpg

They think everything belongs in the house.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Kids%20and%20critters/KidsCritters068.jpg

Even Tinkerbell gets to babysit.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Kids%20and%20critters/KidsCritters064.jpg


Learning to get our share too.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Kids%20and%20critters/IMG_5973.jpg

http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Kids%20and%20critters/IMG_7257.jpg

http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Kids%20and%20critters/IMG_6116.jpg

I mean they get a wee bit ridiculous
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Kids%20and%20critters/IMG_6145.jpg

BrotherRockeye
04-07-2014, 09:32 PM
;D I think our kids would get along fine :p

pitw
04-10-2014, 09:54 PM
Well the protein factory had her calf this morning.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Kids%20and%20critters/IMG_0537_zps6e479ad9.jpg

Now we get fresh milk for a few weeks until we turn her out to pasture with three calves. This one is another bull calf and I think we will eat it just cause my neighbor swears holstein cross makes the best meat. I disagree but he will buy half of it and that makes it easier.

road kill
04-11-2014, 02:43 AM
Aw calving season, i'm nearing the end and my back is about done in. I hate bottle feeding calves now as we have no kids around anymore to do it. ;D

pitw
04-18-2014, 11:07 AM
Well now that the cow has had time to work the colostrum through her system and we feel it is good enough for our use I will show a couple ways we use to gather cream.
First is probably the oldest as well. Just put the milk in a container and let the cream rise to the top.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/IMG_0608_zpscc8f4ee4.jpg

Them skim it off.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/IMG_0613_zpsac28592f.jpg

The only problem with this method is the room it takes up.
The second method involves the use of mechanics and centrifugal force to remove the cream. The separator removes the cream in minutes so storage is much easier but cleanup is a [female dog].
The discs used in the separator.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/IMG_0600_zpseeccca15.jpg

Held in by the bell.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/IMG_0602_zps6c439c95.jpg

Which better be tight.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/IMG_0603_zps4dacaa6d.jpg

All together with spouts and bowl.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/IMG_0607_zps07c7aaf7.jpg

Fill er up
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/IMG_0609_zpse5ba813d.jpg

And let it go.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/IMG_0610_zps7d38c0bd.jpg

The skimmed milk that tastes great and makes pigs, calves, chickens, dogs and cats fat and lazy. I grew up using whole milk on everything but the wife likes skimmed milk for drinking and cereal, this lets us both have our way.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/IMG_0611_zps57468990.jpg

The cream that makes butter, whipped cream, baking and artery's harden.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/IMG_0612_zps69991012.jpg

Is it worth it? Obviously to us it is cause we get to have the product fresh and the cost is low[time with the critters and doing chores could have been wasted watching an electronic box]. As we can't sell this anymore it's amazing how the neighbors manage to come over for old times sake and that is a huge bonus.

BrotherRockeye
04-18-2014, 11:40 AM
That brings back some memories...that rig is a lot smaller and easier to run than the old crank version I had in the shed...

my Mom used to skim the top of a 5 gallon pail into a 2 quart mason jar and make me shake the butter out of it for baking :)

pitw
04-22-2014, 10:58 PM
Those who wish to be prepared or just like living a different life style using old methods and pure goodness to enjoy their food will want to make butter. Even in a catastrophe people who have the where with all and a bit of knowledge can produce food that is enjoyable and will sustain life nicely. Those who have followed along with me know I do things a mite different than most but I/we enjoy it.[Not like we can't go to a city it's just that we choose not to mostly] Tonight we took 3 quarts of the cream you saw us make.

http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/IMG_0625_zps5b44eb1c.jpg

Donny got to pick the churn we would use this time[I suppose I have maybe 20 different ones] from 2 we hadn't used yet. You can use most anything that moves the cream to make butter, just a jar to shake it in, a mix master, a churn or whatever your imagination can muster.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/IMG_0626_zps8802b6f0.jpg

The family even went along with my idea of using weight as a way of telling butter fat content[I can now tell you that we turned the screw on the separator in to make richer cream]
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/IMG_0628_zpsd7d32915.jpg

He washed his choice cause cleanliness is next to not getting a slap upside the head here and poured in the cream.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/IMG_0630_zps31b07a6e.jpg

Then.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/IMG_0632_zps864f199d.jpg

One of the lads who helped do pigs called over to see if Bobby wanted to go out tonight and was told we were making butter, so over he came.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/IMG_0634_zps6e3ac61f.jpg

After dumping the butter milk out and many wash's with cold water in the churn it comes out looking like this.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/IMG_0636_zps64bfe998.jpg

Now you wash and work it more to get all the milk out as that is what can sour your gold. http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/IMG_0637_zpsfe209132.jpg

You end up with a product that is tough to beat and looking in one of our old books the wife found a an old recipe[kinda/sorta that called for 1 oz of salt to every pound of butter. Now I ain't a scientist but I used 1/2 teaspoon on this 1 1/2 lbs of butter and the taste test by three boys and myself said it was enough. Makes me think the old boys with out refrigeration didn't depend on the salt to maybe help keep the butter better longer[I don't know cause I ain't a scientist. Is it worth it to make your own butter financially, NO. But it is fun to do some and knowing how can maybe come in handy someday.

We will have butter milk pancakes, chocolate cake and toast with fresh butter that is to die for.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/IMG_0638_zps09f85a55.jpg

Thanks for allowing me to share and now that my work season is about to start we will be putting the extra calves on the cow and not have fresh milk in about two weeks. This fall we will be back at it though and the boys have expressed an interest in making cheese.

OEM
04-23-2014, 07:55 AM
So so good. Loved your post on CGN and love it here too buddy! I'm going to show my wife this thread. She's really big into making our own food...she makes all our bread, buns and other goodies. No preservatives is her mantra. Dunno how we'll make our own butter and cream without getting fresh milk though ;-)

awndray
04-23-2014, 08:01 AM
I love your threads. Thanks again for sharing.

harbl_the_cat
04-23-2014, 11:42 AM
I love your threads. Thanks again for sharing.

I do too...

Derail thread started:

http://www.gunownersofcanada.ca/showthread.php?13574-Stay-or-Go-Prepping

BrotherRockeye
04-23-2014, 01:33 PM
reliving my childhood in this thread :p

next time make those lads shake the jars til the butter forms...like my Mom did to me...they'll get it when they realize they're stronger than everyone else their age... :)

btw that butter makes the best shortbread ever...

pitw
04-23-2014, 06:57 PM
Thanks guys. We all can share something and mine happens to be living with the land. The boys have done the milk in the jar shaking thingy as I like to get them to learn many things. The one they hate is the 3 gallon crock with a dasher to plunge up and down[can't say I blame them cause I do too]. Learning that there is more than one way to skin a cat allows us to figure out how to do a dog too.

BrotherRockeye
04-23-2014, 09:56 PM
Learning that there is more than one way to skin a cat allows us to figure out how to do a dog too.


that's wisdom right there...old school!

tigrr
04-24-2014, 08:46 AM
Your living the life pitw. Thanks for the teachings.

harbl_the_cat
04-24-2014, 09:13 AM
that's wisdom right there...old school!

Poor kitty... and doge...

But also very true.

pitw
04-24-2014, 03:18 PM
I sold the little heifer for $350 to a fellow who needed it to put on one of his best heifers that lost it's calf. I got another bull calf from the feedlot.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Kids%20and%20critters/IMG_0646_zpsb720b6b4.jpg

It joined with his new family easily.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Kids%20and%20critters/IMG_0648_zpse187f8b0.jpg

Where the term milk on the lips came from.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Kids%20and%20critters/IMG_0650_zps72d972bf.jpg

This cows heifer from two years ago also had a heifer calf yesterday and I'll post a pic when I take one where it is a mite less fuzzy.

harbl_the_cat
04-24-2014, 03:54 PM
Man... that gives me a great idea... another derail thread started...

pitw
04-24-2014, 04:43 PM
Man... that gives me a great idea... another derail thread started...

LOL

pitw
04-26-2014, 06:47 AM
The heifer from the cow and her heifer which I'll keep for Donny to use as a 4H project and cow.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Kids%20and%20critters/IMG_0675_zpsa839fa29.jpg

pitw
05-04-2014, 10:42 AM
Little update.
We set the screw on the churn for thicker cream and it made a difference in churning time that was quite an amazement to Donny this morning as it took 7 minutes to make this.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/IMG_0704_zpse6b7612e.jpg

pitw
05-04-2014, 11:21 AM
Fresh buttermilk pancakes made by my 13 year old son after he washed the butter. :pot:

http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/IMG_0705_zpse14e6bdb.jpg

Add some :cool1:
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/IMG_0706_zps5fc68f03.jpg

And you end up with a breakfast made from your own farm which makes it a mite sweeter.:D
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/IMG_0712_zpsb30c4241.jpg

Edenchef
05-04-2014, 11:57 AM
Yum!! And I will bet it has so much more flavor than the over processed stuff from the grocery store too!

Cheers!

harbl_the_cat
05-05-2014, 02:24 PM
Hey Pitw, have you heard about this big pig virus outbreak?

http://www.thedailysheeple.com/pig-virus-kills-7-million-piglets-in-the-us-one-teaspoon-of-the-virus-is-enough-to-wipe-out-the-entire-us-herd_052014

It sounds like it's landed in Canada.

Going to suck for all of us who can't produce our own bacon. It doesn't seem to be contagious to humans, but it likely will eviscerate pork supplies and send the price of pork to the moon...


Pig Virus Kills 7 Million Piglets in the US: One Teaspoon of the Virus is Enough to Wipe Out the Entire US Herd -

A pig virus – so virulent that experts say a single teaspoon of infected manure would be enough to wipe out the US National herd – has killed 7 million piglets in the United States over the last year.

Porcine Epidemic Diarrhoea Virus (PEDv) is thought to have originated in China.

France is expected to suspend the importation of live pigs and pig sperm. The disease has been found in Mexico, Canada and Japan as well as in the United States.

The virus isn’t harmful to humans and does not contaminate food, but the economic costs can be devastating and this is the reason France is seeking to impose the import ban.

In North America, the disease has moved rapidly, with around 4,000 outbreaks in 30 US states, in four Canadian provinces and in parts of Mexico.

Experts in the field believe that lax biosecurity is an important factor.

In June last year a US study found that 17% of trucks going into a slaughterhouse were positive for the infection.

“They also discovered that 11% of the trucks that had been negative when they went into the slaughterhouse were subsequently positive when they left,” said Dr Zoe Davies from the UK’s National Pig Association (NPA).

“It’s how many animals you are moving around, that’s how its being spread.”

Dried pig feed is also thought to be a causative factor in the spread of the virus. It contains pig blood and is given to weaning piglets. Bernard Valliat from the World Organization for Animal Health said:

“Blood from slaughterhouses with insufficient heat treatment is suspected to be the origin. We don’t have a scientific publication on that but it is highly suspected,”

With food costs already soaring, an increase in the price of pork due to supply shortages is the last thing anyone needs. In addition, farmers face high costs in disposing of infected carcasses, something that many can ill afford.

- See more at: http://www.thedailysheeple.com/pig-virus-kills-7-million-piglets-in-the-us-one-teaspoon-of-the-virus-is-enough-to-wipe-out-the-entire-us-herd_052014#sthash.6tJK428Y.dpuf

coastal
05-05-2014, 04:24 PM
Yikes! That sound scary.

harbl_the_cat
05-05-2014, 04:39 PM
I think it's kind of gross that pig feed may contain pig blood... is that another thing any hog farmers can confirm is an industry practice?

Smellofspentcasings
05-05-2014, 06:07 PM
I was reading an article on how the chicken industry was trying to find a way to process chicken crap into cattle feed.

pitw
05-05-2014, 09:51 PM
If people knew what all they were eating from land or sea, I'm thinking most would do what I am trying to do. Mad cow disease was blamed on feeding chickens to cows, ever seen a cow with feathers sticking out of her mouth naturally? In China they feed critters in layers so that the poop runs down for the next layer to eat. Not a chance in [L] that I'm eating anything from there. I'm as guilty as any as a pesticide applicator I spend my working time putting poison on your food. I do try to do it responsibly and stay within guidelines or even cheat in our favor a mite. The pig disease has caused many farmers to have to sell off the herd and decontaminate the barns. Why wouldn't we expect animals kept in close quarters to get diseased? Do you think the bubonic plague attacked farmers or slickers? The cage has grown to small and there is only one cure for that.

harbl_the_cat
05-06-2014, 09:54 AM
If people knew what all they were eating from land or sea, I'm thinking most would do what I am trying to do. Mad cow disease was blamed on feeding chickens to cows, ever seen a cow with feathers sticking out of her mouth naturally? In China they feed critters in layers so that the poop runs down for the next layer to eat. Not a chance in [L] that I'm eating anything from there. I'm as guilty as any as a pesticide applicator I spend my working time putting poison on your food. I do try to do it responsibly and stay within guidelines or even cheat in our favor a mite. The pig disease has caused many farmers to have to sell off the herd and decontaminate the barns. Why wouldn't we expect animals kept in close quarters to get diseased? Do you think the bubonic plague attacked farmers or slickers? The cage has grown to small and there is only one cure for that.

I concur with that sentiment.

I tried for a while eating only meats prescribed in the Old Testament, but then I realized most mass produced meat, even in North America, utilizes techniques that completely abrogate the point of having those dietary restrictions in the first place.

It's hard being of oriental descent and not eating pork, but I figure back in Biblical times, they both didn't have electricity or guns, ergo uncooked pork would have posed a major health concern and feral hogs would have been catastrophic to the economy of an agricultural society with no easy means to exterminate the pests. (I wouldn't feel comfortable taking down a hog with a .223 rifle, let alone a bow).

I thank God for technology. I thank Satan for inedible, cancer causing, mass produced garbage meat...

To that thought, my family split half of a fully grass fed cow with my Pastor's wife (they knew an organic farmer from BC). I can't believe how different it tastes from normal beef.

I heard all the grains they feed the cows normally make them super fatty and buttery, but the grass fed stuff is super lean and almost taste's like venison. A friend of mine who grew up on a farm in Manitoba said cows love corn, but it's basically the cow equivalent to doughnuts.

My cousin's a professional chef and he says one of the problems, even with higher quality grain fed/grass finished beef is those animals' digestive tract can't really process grains. Feeding them corn causes them to gain weight very rapidly, but the animals themselves don't end up being very healthy (as healthy as teenage kid who eats doughnuts 3 meals a day would be), so they need to be juiced up on antibiotics. Of course, the faster they hit a certain weight threshold, the sooner they can be brought to the market, ergo, the practice of grain feeding/antibiotic juicing becomes the standard.

Is there any truth to that?

Also, have you ever had problems with Feral hogs, Pitw?

BrotherRockeye
05-06-2014, 10:21 AM
fyi it's grass fed/grain finished ; )

harbl_the_cat
05-06-2014, 12:10 PM
fyi it's grass fed/grain finished ; )

I stand corrected :)

That's why I'm not cut out to grow my own livestock.

I heard (but don't know for sure) that most American beef is primarily grain fed or fed more grain than Canadian beef. Any one know of any truth to that?

Smellofspentcasings
05-06-2014, 07:25 PM
The free range beef we get is not fed grain at all. Neither is the game meat.

pitw
05-06-2014, 07:36 PM
The free range beef we get is not fed grain at all. Neither is the game meat.

That is good if it's what you want. Our deer eat grain when the crops are ripe and out of piles or around bins in winter.

Smellofspentcasings
05-07-2014, 02:01 PM
That is good if it's what you want. Our deer eat grain when the crops are ripe and out of piles or around bins in winter.

We had the same thing when I lived in Saskatchewan . The Canada geese were better tasting than out here in BC for same reason.

walperstyle
06-25-2014, 05:07 AM
Socialist/Communist Grease taste horrible.


as for meat. I got some hutterite friends. Better than wholesale prices, cut and vacuum wrapped. Same stuff sold to markets.

harbl_the_cat
06-25-2014, 10:28 AM
The cafe at my church sells Hutterite sausage. REALLY good stuff.

pitw
06-25-2014, 11:20 AM
Wouldn't trade one of our chickens for 5 of theirs. I was spraying for a very good colony in '98 when we drove in the yard[The boss man and I] there were about 1,500 birds[turkeys, chickens, ducks and geese] walking around the yard[feed yard] and I asked why they were outside when there was a barn with some 50,000 inside. The simple answer was,"them are the ones we eat".

harbl_the_cat
06-25-2014, 02:15 PM
Wouldn't trade one of our chickens for 5 of theirs. I was spraying for a very good colony in '98 when we drove in the yard[The boss man and I] there were about 1,500 birds[turkeys, chickens, ducks and geese] walking around the yard[feed yard] and I asked why they were outside when there was a barn with some 50,000 inside. The simple answer was,"them are the ones we eat".

lol...

pitw
09-24-2014, 10:36 AM
Sometimes we don't why we help each other but I have helped a fellow who owns a feedlot just because he has some interesting stuff. Last evening I was just sat down to a wood fire cooked rib eye steak when the phone rang. Sam is on the other end and he says, "Bring a gun and knives cause I'm gonna butcher a 1,300 lb steer that just broke his leg". Donny and I were off like a shot cause loosely translated Sammy wanted to give us meat for helping. Donny and I got to ride in the bucket of a very large loader as we made our way through a pen of around 200 big beeves. I ain't never shot a critter from a loader before but with my old .22 it took 1 shot and a quick poke with the knife to bleed it. Sam decided to just take the back straps and hind quarter meat.
What I brought home this morning and turned into steaks, roasts and hamburger.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/DSCF1701_zps215bfe58.jpg
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/DSCF1703_zps637943a1.jpg

100 lbs of pure meat that would cost over $500 at a butcher shop and Donny saying, "rednecks have more fun than slicker folks, eh".
Boys it was as much fun as can possibly be legal and I learned as well as Donny.

awndray
09-24-2014, 11:08 AM
That's awesome. Well done (the job, not the meat).

Grey_Wolf
09-24-2014, 11:31 PM
If people knew what all they were eating from land or sea, I'm thinking most would do what I am trying to do. Mad cow disease was blamed on feeding chickens to cows, ever seen a cow with feathers sticking out of her mouth naturally? In China they feed critters in layers so that the poop runs down for the next layer to eat. Not a chance in [L] that I'm eating anything from there. I'm as guilty as any as a pesticide applicator I spend my working time putting poison on your food. I do try to do it responsibly and stay within guidelines or even cheat in our favor a mite. The pig disease has caused many farmers to have to sell off the herd and decontaminate the barns. Why wouldn't we expect animals kept in close quarters to get diseased? Do you think the bubonic plague attacked farmers or slickers? The cage has grown to small and there is only one cure for that.

Wasn't that feeding cows to cows? If I remember right it was the "scraps" that got tossed into the cow feed to boost the protein that was the culprit. Specifically the brain, spinal cord and a couple other things I can't remember and too lazy to look up right now.

Grey_Wolf
09-24-2014, 11:49 PM
I concur with that sentiment.

I tried for a while eating only meats prescribed in the Old Testament, but then I realized most mass produced meat, even in North America, utilizes techniques that completely abrogate the point of having those dietary restrictions in the first place.

It's hard being of oriental descent and not eating pork, but I figure back in Biblical times, they both didn't have electricity or guns, ergo uncooked pork would have posed a major health concern and feral hogs would have been catastrophic to the economy of an agricultural society with no easy means to exterminate the pests. (I wouldn't feel comfortable taking down a hog with a .223 rifle, let alone a bow).

I thank God for technology. I thank Satan for inedible, cancer causing, mass produced garbage meat...

To that thought, my family split half of a fully grass fed cow with my Pastor's wife (they knew an organic farmer from BC). I can't believe how different it tastes from normal beef.

I heard all the grains they feed the cows normally make them super fatty and buttery, but the grass fed stuff is super lean and almost taste's like venison. A friend of mine who grew up on a farm in Manitoba said cows love corn, but it's basically the cow equivalent to doughnuts.

My cousin's a professional chef and he says one of the problems, even with higher quality grain fed/grass finished beef is those animals' digestive tract can't really process grains. Feeding them corn causes them to gain weight very rapidly, but the animals themselves don't end up being very healthy (as healthy as teenage kid who eats doughnuts 3 meals a day would be), so they need to be juiced up on antibiotics. Of course, the faster they hit a certain weight threshold, the sooner they can be brought to the market, ergo, the practice of grain feeding/antibiotic juicing becomes the standard.

Is there any truth to that?

Also, have you ever had problems with Feral hogs, Pitw?


fyi it's grass fed/grain finished ; )

I know of a couple of women that won't eat from the farm beef cause "it's the wrong colour".

Define normal.

The American cattle are generally finished on corn, ours are generally finished on barley. And yes by the time they are ready for slaughter from the feedlot they are not long for this world anyway. The super high grain diet (unnaturally high by the way) that cattle are finished on will literally finish them if they were not to be slaughtered. Seems to me the high barley diet first attacks their liver and well it doesn't go well from there. Barley puts that nice white fat that we like on them, corn is more yellow fat. There are lots of people looking for and buying grass finished beef, no grain period. If I calved earlier in the year i would cater to that but my calves are to small to finish on grass. There is no way in h, e, double hockey sticks I am calving in January.

You forgot steroids. Most, not all, feedlots use steroid implants on their cattle to boost rate of gain and finished weights. And of course there is the whole medicated feed thing (anti-biotics).

pitw
09-26-2014, 05:11 PM
Wife used up six pounds of the burger.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/IMG_1112_zps18280c08.jpg

Beef Stick
5-6lb lean beef
1/4 cup curing salt[tender quick]
1/2 Tbsp dry mustard
1 tsp garlic salt
3 Tbsp liquid smoke
1 1/2 tsp coarse black pepper
3 Tbsp mustard seed
Mix all ingredients together and place in fridge for 48 hours. Shape in rolls 2-3 inch in diameter and place on broiling pan. Bake in oven for 4 hours at 225F.

pitw
10-25-2014, 11:57 AM
Update.
The cow came home with her three calves yesterday. Here is her calf that went straight to market.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Kids%20and%20critters/photo_zps4f52c835.jpg

The calf weighed 581 lbs and after shrink and brought us $1,253.27 after commision/brand inspection/P.A.C./ABP./presort fee/insurance. This a very high price for a half Holstein steer in my opinion. Price of cattle is the highest in history here. We will take $750 of this to buy 300 bushels of barley to feed the other three calves[got another heifer calf from this cows heifer from two years ago]/ chickens and pigs for the year.

Here is Betsy and her other two calves she adopted. The red one will be a Donny's 4H steer and the black will be a companion calf that will make steaks.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Kids%20and%20critters/DSCF1728_zps92a6c200.jpg

To top it off we will get a gallon of milk a day that makes the stuff in a store taste like [stuff in a pile behind a horse].

tigrr
10-25-2014, 07:51 PM
Wow incredible. I shot my first bear and I am enjoying my berry mountain grass bear. I wish I lived closer because I'd like to learn an 8th of what you know about processing meat. The milk story reminds me of the farmer I did some work for and he traded his young free range chickens in the barter. These chickens weighed 6 to 8 pounds. And had a great flavor to them. Didn't need spices or a coating or bbq sauce or ketchup.

pitw
10-25-2014, 10:30 PM
I'd like to try your bear too. We're doing chickens tomorrow that will weigh from 7-11 lbs.

pitw
04-23-2015, 09:06 AM
Well the old milk cow came up dry this winter and we sold her for more than we paid for her 8 years ago with a calf. She left a legacy though in a heifer she had 3 years ago. My lad got a bull calf from a feedlot owner in trade for him helping the fellows grandkids learn how to lead, show and groom their calves. The lad taking his new project for a run.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Kids%20and%20critters/IMG_2420_zps8bkcu7sz.jpg

Then the new milk cow calved 2 nights ago and she will raise both her calf[next years meat supply as it's a bull] and the lads calf which is the one having breakfast.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Kids%20and%20critters/Untitled_zpsvlnxwuxf.png

pitw
05-14-2015, 06:16 AM
well the companion calf from above turned into a carcass calf project for the lad.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Making%20food/IMG_1285_zpslmlqg5mq.jpg

The carcass calves from the club were butchered on Tuesday and I'll tell you I had to smile when this specimen who showed up as a free piece of mud/manure encrusted critter took home the buckle for best grading and top weight gaining of the bunch. He missed grading prime by one point but at AAA and 8mm of fat[if he had only 2-4mm he would have gained 2 more points making him prime] he'll be great eating. 4th year in a row the lads have won rate of gain here at the farm where they receive no hormones.

pitw
06-05-2015, 11:14 AM
Well Donny got his buckle for top carcass calf at achievement day yesterday.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Bobs%20Pictures/IMG_1365_zpsiozly3wd.jpg

The other lad got a buckle too.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Bobs%20Pictures/IMG_1369_zpsoe9cksw2.jpg

To go along with
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Bobs%20Pictures/IMG_1367_zpsqudqlodl.jpg

For his
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/Bobs%20Pictures/20150604_161601_zps4f9td0oo.jpg

Having the champion steer also garnered him a sale price with a premium of $2/lb over market values.
If'n you have a 4H club near you to get your kids into, do it. Most wonderful organization in the world in my opinion.

Rory McCanuck
06-05-2015, 12:11 PM
Well done lads!!!

Kenwp
06-05-2015, 09:00 PM
I have had several calves given to me in the last few years but with week old calves going for almost $500 bucks right now haven't had any offers lately. Even the poor ones are going for almost $1:50 a pound right now. Might be able to find a Jersey calf if I look hard enough.

tigrr
06-05-2015, 09:24 PM
Wow things have sure changed since 1974. The ribbon was 1 inch wide and 5 inches long... Their belt buckles look good.

Kenwp
06-07-2015, 07:01 AM
My days in 4H we were lucky to get 30 cents a pound for a steer at the sale. But that was in the 60's. Never had belt buckles in those days either. Would have been a nice thing to have as a reminder.

pitw
06-07-2015, 07:43 AM
My days in 4H we were lucky to get 30 cents a pound for a steer at the sale. But that was in the 60's. Never had belt buckles in those days either. Would have been a nice thing to have as a reminder.

Wife got a buckle in 1980 from the Simmental association for winning grand champ with a Simmental critter.

This club allows members to be part of a team that looks after each other. They go out and do things like collect tires to help pay for club activities.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/4H/IMG_0402_zpsxwkswjjp.jpg
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/4H/IMG_0413_zpspkedoyic.jpg

Filling sandbags they sell to local service stations that people buy for weight or traction.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/4H/IMG_0176_zps30rfeew6.jpg

The cleavers love doing their thing.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/4H/IMG_0370_zpswlgn85k4.jpg

Activities include visiting each farm to see how the calves are doing.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/4H/IMG_0318_zpsuu70nze4.jpg

Curling
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/4H/IMG_0333_zpsnp5vwy10.jpg

Christmas
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/4H/IMG_0248_zpsfp1wc5qr.jpg

Some of the calves are a mite high headed at weigh in.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/4H/IMG_0207_zpsntwqrqv7.jpg

Never think that these young folk don't get attached to the animals.
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/4H/IMG_0398_zpsrgcd0dks.jpg
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh145/pitw75/4H/IMG_0393_zpstopajcmk.jpg

road kill
06-07-2015, 07:53 AM
Congrats to those kids on a job well done. I was a 4H leader in beef so i know what kind of work they do.

pitw
06-07-2015, 08:03 AM
Congrats to those kids on a job well done. I was a 4H leader in beef so i know what kind of work they do.

The great thing about the program is it helps all ages. A good buddy who I always thought drank a little excessively got asked to lead another beef club last year and man has it changed him.:cool::cool:

kennymo
06-07-2015, 07:34 PM
Nice pictures, I spent a good few years in the local 4-H Beef club.

Kenwp
06-07-2015, 08:56 PM
Wish I could take pictures like that. I have two calves right now people gave me. They are my pets until they get big enough to eat. My wife gets down over that. I always liked living in your part of the country as I spent 11 years living north of Edgerton. What do they do with the tires by the way.

pitw
06-07-2015, 10:13 PM
They take the tires to the municipal dump and get paid for the rubber in recycling fees. Bigger tires = more money. Know Edgerton well as I am only 30 miles from it.

pitw
06-04-2016, 07:40 AM
Thursday was achievement day for our local 4H. The lad sold his 1/4 Holstein steer calf that came in second in rate of gain[3.79 lbs/day] for $2.09/lb[it weighed 1550] . First year we had sheep at the club as projects. I made the local farm machinery dealer pay $475 for the first one and I got the second one[123 lbs] for $275. Rained an inch after the sale so I wasn't working yesterday and the boys and I butchered the sheep which took 22 minutes. One hint for those of you who want to attempt butchering sheep is to never touch the wool with your hands and then touch the meat. We have dedicated skin holder and the other guy runs the knife and touch's the meat. Today we will cut up the sheep and take half of it over to my 84 year old neighbor as he loves the stuff too.
I certainly had to feel good when my 15 year old said, "Cool, I ain't never butchered a sheep yet". It was tough being thanked by a 10 year old girl for buying her project while she had tears rolling down her cheeks.

tigrr
06-04-2016, 08:06 AM
LIG

pitw
06-04-2016, 08:14 AM
LIG

Little Icky Goobers?

Rory McCanuck
06-04-2016, 11:34 AM
Life Is Good.

looch
06-05-2016, 04:27 PM
It was tough being thanked by a 10 year old girl for buying her project while she had tears rolling down her cheeks.

I've butchered a few spring lambs and that's hard enough without the thought of heartbroken little girl. Maybe I'm spineless, but I think I would have lied to her.

pitw
06-05-2016, 08:41 PM
I've butchered a few spring lambs and that's hard enough without the thought of heartbroken little girl. Maybe I'm spineless, but I think I would have lied to her.

They know what's gonna happen usually. It is good for people to know where there food comes from.

R&R Rancher
06-06-2016, 07:51 AM
I've butchered a few spring lambs and that's hard enough without the thought of heartbroken little girl. Maybe I'm spineless, but I think I would have lied to her.

To echo what PITW says below, the kids know the deal up front. This is how it worked back at home. The youngster "buys" the animal from their parents when it is weaned. They feed the calf all winter to finish it. In early summer all the animals are taken to the local fair where the completion is held. After the completion there is an auction where all the calves are sold. Grand champion obviously brings top dollar and is usually bought by a local ag business who will write the cost off as advertising. All animals are then slaughtered and the carcass completion is held. Very often the champion animal does not win this competition. The money from the auction is used for the youngster to pay back the next initial cost of the animal plus the feed. It is a good lesson for the kids as to where meat comes from, but most of them already know.

There is also a heifer competition that takes 2 years. The process is the same except instead of selling and slaughtering the animal, the heifer goes back home and is bred. Next year the heifer and her calf come back for show. Again after the show they go home.

If you buy an animal after the competition it can be a great source of tasty beef.

PITW, thanks for the enjoyable thread

kennymo
06-06-2016, 09:09 AM
I do recall it being a little tough letting go of that first 4-H steer you just spent months training to lead and pose properly for the big show. They do become a little more pet like than the other eating critters on the farm. All in all it's great for kids though. Still friends with a number of the people I spent years in the program with...

walperstyle
08-01-2016, 09:20 AM
My name is James Walper with the Libertarian Party of Canada, and I support farming that has nothing to do with government!

Keep on Keep'n on!

mavrik9
08-01-2016, 10:40 AM
I can't wait for my kids to be old enough to start 4H lamb. I can only hope to be on a small farm by then.

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