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Prairie Dog
10-01-2014, 12:15 AM
LED? HID? Halogen?

Any recommendations and real world reviews?

I'm thinking of putting a set of off road lights on a grille bar and an LED bar in the grille of my truck. Looking to get medium distance and some more light to the side.

Would you go with all white or put some amber in there? Flood? Spot? Combo?

So far I like these:

http://www.4wheelparts.com/Lighting-Lighting-Accessories/Pro-Sport-Series-LED-Driving-Light.aspx?t_c=14&t_s=448&t_pt=4242&t_pn=K%2fC644

http://www.4wheelparts.com/Lighting-Lighting-Accessories/DR24-DOUBLE-ROW-LED-FLOOD-SPOT-COMP-PATTERN.aspx?t_c=14&t_s=448&t_pt=4242&t_pn=EXP76420

Carguy2550
10-01-2014, 01:56 AM
I'd go LED all the way. It makes a nice white light. We put three LED bars (flood) and a few LED spot lights on a high clearance sprayer. In lights stuff up well past the end of the boom arms. On a good night you even see the eyes lurking in the bush 300+ yards away. I can't remember the brand we used but the light bar you chose looks similar.

stevesummit
10-01-2014, 06:26 AM
I had a 2' led light bar on my truck and it would light up a stop sign a mile away . There is no beating them. Just make sure you hide well enough so the shit pumps don't steal it from you like they did with mine .

jwirecom109
10-01-2014, 06:32 AM
I had a 2' led light bar on my truck and it would light up a stop sign a mile away . There is no beating them. Just make sure you hide well enough so the shit pumps don't steal it from you like they did with mine .
I last set I saw were under the grill, hard to steal those but, they would drop your direct lumens

stevesummit
10-01-2014, 06:40 AM
There are some different shaped ones out now so I would try to find a set that could replace your factory driving lights and have the added security of them buried behind your bumper

MadMax
10-01-2014, 07:14 AM
What kind of truck do you have Stevesummit? We have a couple guys at work that have them replacing their factor lights and fog lights.
I can ask around to see what they have.

stevesummit
10-01-2014, 07:36 AM
Mine is a 2010 3500 ram with a bullet proof bumper on it I have found a set that will fit the light holes in my bumper . Nadp was sold out last time I was in their shop. But they do have a good selection of lights there

Camo tung
10-01-2014, 08:13 AM
I still have the rack of stainless KC's from my old Bronco - totalled around 2.5 million candle power. You could suck the uninformed into burning the hair off the backs of their hands at least once.

coastal
10-01-2014, 08:30 AM
I put a 32" combo light bar on my 4runner....its just sick. I can't believe how much light these things throw.

Also, even the good brands that cost 4x as much are made over seas and "assembled" in America. ;)

BrotherRockeye
10-01-2014, 08:52 AM
Regardless of what you run for white lights, a set of ambers are a good idea.
I like to run at least one set of amber "fog" lights on their own switch. Driving snow reflects white light but the amber will let you see the ground. Those little yellow lights have kept me driving on many occasions where the wall of white was all I could see otherwise.

Zedbra
10-01-2014, 09:32 AM
Earlier this summer I spent a few days up north with my brother where he works for a logging outfit. There was a heated discussion about what lights to use, but the general consensus was that the LED bars do not give off enough heat to melt the snow that hits them and they are useless in no time for heavy snow. Therefore, they keep one good set of halogen high wattage lights up front. I have no proof, just anecdotal stories from logging truck drivers, but I have stuck to halogens simply because of cost - though the LED bars look great.

blacksmithden
10-01-2014, 09:43 AM
I put a 32" combo light bar on my 4runner....its just sick. I can't believe how much light these things throw.

Also, even the good brands that cost 4x as much are made over seas and "assembled" in America. ;)

Dont read too much into the made in China, assembled in America thing. There is a big difference between the product you get out of a Chinese factory if you have an inspector checking your stuff for you before it leaves. One of the little things I learned when I decided to try importing stuff. What Wal-Mart wont accept winds up on places like AliExpress. They go on and on about their warranties, knowing full well it'll cost you more to ship it back than the.product is worth. Even if you do ship it back, they just say they didnt receive it....or if its signature required, they just refuse it and your stuff is lost in mail space in China.

Stuff that is at least assembled on this continent has some form of quality control and accountability most of the time. Stuff thats purely made in China by peace workers.....mmmmmm.....not so much.

Rory McCanuck
10-01-2014, 11:19 AM
LED? HID? Halogen?

Any recommendations and real world reviews?

I'm thinking of putting a set of off road lights on a grille bar and an LED bar in the grille of my truck. Looking to get medium distance and some more light to the side.

Would you go with all white or put some amber in there? Flood? Spot? Combo?

Just make sure you have it hard wired so that they're on all the time, especially in those scary suburban enviroments.
Also, aiming them properly is critical. For maximum 'baggery, they must all be focused on a point 1/2-3/4 miles on the other side of a double- divided highway, such as the #1. Ignore all those flashing lights coming at you; those are just jealous people glorying in your awesomeness.

Dont read too much into the made in China, assembled in America thing...
Also, if it doesn't have the CSA mark on it, it is illegal to have it on and facing forward on the highway.
That's why they're called "off-road" lights.
One of the laws I wish the po-po would actually enforce.

Prairie Dog
10-01-2014, 11:23 AM
I had a 2' led light bar on my truck and it would light up a stop sign a mile away . There is no beating them. Just make sure you hide well enough so the shit pumps don't steal it from you like they did with mine .

A very big concern of mine. I've thought of tamper/theft proof nuts, tack welding the nut on and even had green loctite suggested.


Regardless of what you run for white lights, a set of ambers are a good idea.
I like to run at least one set of amber "fog" lights on their own switch. Driving snow reflects white light but the amber will let you see the ground. Those little yellow lights have kept me driving on many occasions where the wall of white was all I could see otherwise.

I'm leaning in that direction. Some lights come with amber covers, not sure though if that would be as good as an actual amber light.


Earlier this summer I spent a few days up north with my brother where he works for a logging outfit. There was a heated discussion about what lights to use, but the general consensus was that the LED bars do not give off enough heat to melt the snow that hits them and they are useless in no time for heavy snow. Therefore, they keep one good set of halogen high wattage lights up front. I have no proof, just anecdotal stories from logging truck drivers, but I have stuck to halogens simply because of cost - though the LED bars look great.

The railroad has recently converted some signals to LED and that is a problem in winter. The city of Edmonton has some LED street lights and after a storm there is certainly more snow stuck to them as compared to an incandescent light.

Prairie Dog
10-01-2014, 12:16 PM
Just make sure you have it hard wired so that they're on all the time, especially in those scary suburban enviroments.
Also, aiming them properly is critical. For maximum 'baggery, they must all be focused on a point 1/2-3/4 miles on the other side of a double- divided highway, such as the #1. Ignore all those flashing lights coming at you; those are just jealous people glorying in your awesomeness.


It annoys me too.

4: All trucks must be lifted and fitted with the largest and most aggressive tire available.
i) Suspension lifts on diesel trucks must be so that the exhaust outlet is positioned directly at or into the window of cars.
ii) All trucks must be equipped with sufficient aftermarket lights that when illuminated can be seen from the International Space Station. Said lights are to be on at all times, regardless of location, time of day or weather condition. [/sarcasm]

Grizz Axxemann
11-11-2014, 09:17 PM
You're just jealous because my lug nuts require more torque than your civic makes.

mavrik9
11-11-2014, 11:21 PM
Earlier this summer I spent a few days up north with my brother where he works for a logging outfit. There was a heated discussion about what lights to use, but the general consensus was that the LED bars do not give off enough heat to melt the snow that hits them and they are useless in no time for heavy snow. Therefore, they keep one good set of halogen high wattage lights up front. I have no proof, just anecdotal stories from logging truck drivers, but I have stuck to halogens simply because of cost - though the LED bars look great.
Similar problem for me too. I drive a snowplow for highways, and last year I tried led lights on the truck. They are great but the snow does not melt off of them. So now I am back to halogen lights.

Tactical72
11-12-2014, 10:12 AM
This is the LED in the snow solution. http://www.truck-lite.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=10001&productId=106527

Juno
01-29-2015, 01:25 PM
Blitzpro lights are also a nice option for the money conscious. I've got two round guys up front and two for the rear for backing up. Amazing light for a cheap price (i bought them before the dollar took a dive)