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View Full Version : same caliber, different rifle: reaction



cormiermc
05-12-2012, 06:57 PM
this morning, my brother went here for shoot his new rifle to align his scope. he bought a remington 770 in 7mm rem. mag. i know, i warn him not to buy this rifle but he didn't listen to me. i have a savage 110 in the same caliber. it will probably made a difference but the savage have a wood stock and the remington a composite stock. we both shoot remington core lock in 150 gr. it was funny to saw how these 2 rifle react differently under fire.

my savage give a good recoil that i can handle easily since i changed the rubber pad on the stock for a better one. also when i shoot, the rifle muzzle go up when firing but accuracy is excelent. strange since my savage is heavier then the remington(probably because of the stock).

my brother's remington, with a bigger but harder recoil pad seems not to be really accurate but we stop firing it because the ammo box bas empty. it also have a really big recoil but the muzzle seems more stable, my brother's shoulder will probably remember it for a few days.

i have to say a love my savage a lot compare to his remington.

FlyingHigh
05-12-2012, 09:02 PM
My Remington 700 in 7mm Rem mag shoots very well with Remington Core Lokt ammo. The 770 is a POS. lol

cormiermc
05-13-2012, 05:09 AM
exactly what i told him before he buy it. he told me it's as a start rifle . he's gonna use it for 3-4 years and sell/trade it after

FlyingHigh
05-13-2012, 10:31 AM
lol. i used to work in a fishing/hunting store. the owner brought in a half dozen 770's to sell as "starter rifles". it took over 2 years to sell those 6 guns. not because people wouldn't buy them, but because as salesmen, we couldn't in good conscience sell someone such a turd. we ended up selling people the Savage 110 with scope package for $40 more. pissed the owner off, but he learned never to bring in crap like that again and we gained some loyal customers for steering them straight.

RobSmith
05-13-2012, 11:10 AM
In this era of "space age plastics" wood is still King. Basic physics will teach you that a heavier rifle beats you around less when you fire it. A lighter gun kinda makes sense if you're going to spend a lot more time carrying it than shooting it. The thing is that the only way to get good at shooting is to shoot ... So that's where a lighter rifle as a "starter gun" doesn't make any sense. Buy a good, heavy one as your first and learn to use it, look forward to passing it on to your grandkids. You can always buy a lighter one later down the road that you swap out every couple of hunting seasons if that's your thing. That being said there is something to be said about affordability when you first get into the shooting game, but 7mm rem mag, with it's massive recoil and 2$ a round shooting cost (when you can find ammo) ain't the way to get a fellow started.

FlyingHigh
05-13-2012, 11:30 AM
In this era of "space age plastics" wood is still King. Basic physics will teach you that a heavier rifle beats you around less when you fire it. A lighter gun kinda makes sense if you're going to spend a lot more time carrying it than shooting it. The thing is that the only way to get good at shooting is to shoot ... So that's where a lighter rifle as a "starter gun" doesn't make any sense. Buy a good, heavy one as your first and learn to use it, look forward to passing it on to your grandkids. You can always buy a lighter one later down the road that you swap out every couple of hunting seasons if that's your thing. That being said there is something to be said about affordability when you first get into the shooting game, but 7mm rem mag, with it's massive recoil and 2$ a round shooting cost (when you can find ammo) ain't the way to get a fellow started.

7mm is actually a very good starter round. Ammo can be found at any Canadian Tire and I've never found a shop that didn't have a box of it. Federal Power Shok (blue box) runs maybe $24 + tax per box on average. a little over a buck a shot. with a 7mm a beginning hunter can take any game in Canada with the exception of grizzly in my opinion. I've seen it drop everything from coyote to moose. as for massive recoil...it's far from massive. it's more of a strong push than a sharp whack. 30/06, .303, .308 etc are all much stronger. the 7mm is .284, pretty much one step up from .270 which is a very common beginner caliber as well.

my very first gun was a 7mm Rem Mag. still have it, still shoot it, still hunt with it. for a hunter, the 7mm Rem Mag is a very versatile, flat shooting, accurate cartridge and is a good place to start before stepping up into the big hitters.

Turkeyslayer 1300
05-13-2012, 01:22 PM
In this era of "space age plastics" wood is still King. Basic physics will teach you that a heavier rifle beats you around less when you fire it. A lighter gun kinda makes sense if you're going to spend a lot more time carrying it than shooting it. The thing is that the only way to get good at shooting is to shoot ... So that's where a lighter rifle as a "starter gun" doesn't make any sense. Buy a good, heavy one as your first and learn to use it, look forward to passing it on to your grandkids. You can always buy a lighter one later down the road that you swap out every couple of hunting seasons if that's your thing. That being said there is something to be said about affordability when you first get into the shooting game, but 7mm rem mag, with it's massive recoil and 2$ a round shooting cost (when you can find ammo) ain't the way to get a fellow started.

The 7 Mag is one of the most readily available and as a result relatively in expensive big game rifle rounds available.

As said the 770 is a piece of junk if it lasts 3-4 years I would be very surprised.

Drache
05-13-2012, 06:39 PM
but 7mm rem mag, with it's massive recoil and 2$ a round shooting cost (when you can find ammo) ain't the way to get a fellow started.


Rob I don't know where you are shopping but my 7mm Rem Mag doesn't have massive recoil. My .308 Norma Magnum on the other hand is bad. As for $2 a round, maybe IF you only buy top of the line premium ammo but plain old hunting ammo is about $24-$28 a box (hell I can buy premium .308 for $2 a round if I wanted). Oh and I've never gone into any gun store, Canadian Tire, or Walmart and had them out of stock.

cormiermc
05-13-2012, 06:44 PM
i agree with all of you, and for the savage 110, mine is 20 years old and i like a lot more then the remington

Joe549
05-13-2012, 08:25 PM
exactly what i told him before he buy it. he told me it's as a start rifle . he's gonna use it for 3-4 years and sell/trade it after

After 3 or 4 years with that PoS, he would be so disgusted that he probably won't ever want to shoot a rifle again and he would have to pay somebody to take the thing away...

BrotherRockeye
05-13-2012, 09:09 PM
yup...coulda had an Axis for the same money...trigger job and yer in!