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View Full Version : The Miracle is 100 years old this year.



Edenchef
12-15-2014, 10:47 PM
I just realized that something I'm sure we all have heard about is 100 years old this Christmas.

The Christmas truce (German: Weihnachtsfrieden; French: TrÍve de NoŽl) was a series of widespread but unofficial ceasefires along the Western Front around Christmas 1914.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christmas_truce

So, as we all enjoy the season with our families and friends; I propose a toast "to all those that
cannot be home,to celebrate; let us celebrate with those we are with!" :Beer time:

CHEERS! Peace and goodwill to all!

blacksmithden
12-15-2014, 10:59 PM
Here here !!!!! :Beer time:

FALover
12-15-2014, 11:32 PM
If I recall the story correctly, troops were told they would be shot if they attempted to do this again. Sometimes the generals should be fragged. The waste of lives for mere yards was the real threat. The soldiers fighting had class and humanity. To share food and drink for the common holiday with those who would be their enemy the next day was truly a act of selfless compassion.

Forbes/Hutton
12-15-2014, 11:38 PM
A commercial for a UK supermarket, but you'd hardly notice that:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWF2JBb1bvM

kennymo
12-15-2014, 11:47 PM
A commercial for a UK supermarket, but you'd hardly notice that:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWF2JBb1bvM

Dammit, I just found the link and you go and do that...;)

I'm not sure who from which side was actually the first to go 'over the top' once the singing started but they must've had balls of steel. I recall reading that in one section of trench one side produced a Christmas Tree from god knows where and they decorated it together with bits of trench art.

And yes, Christmas was cancelled for the next three years, the Generals were embarrassed and it was felt that it would be hard to keep the fighting spirit up back home if it was found out that the troops were all dancing and singing together. I believe it was made treason shortly after by various Grinches and Scrooges.

Edenchef
12-16-2014, 02:32 AM
But yet, 100 years later. The generals are dead and forgotten; even the men involved, their names are forgotten. All that still lives and honors them is what they did......a legacy of honor, a Christmas Miracle!

Cheers!

Edenchef
12-16-2014, 02:45 AM
If I recall the story correctly, troops were told they would be shot if they attempted to do this again. Sometimes the generals should be fragged. The waste of lives for mere yards was the real threat. The soldiers fighting had class and humanity. To share food and drink for the common holiday with those who would be their enemy the next day was truly a act of selfless compassion.
Those men were real soldiers......"brothers in arms" . Cold, hungry, a long way from home; doing what they were told to do, for that "home". The only other men out there that could understand how they felt and share, were on the " other" side. Men of true honor, we have seldom seen their kind since and we sure could use more of their kind today.

Cheers!

harbl_the_cat
12-16-2014, 12:28 PM
A commercial for a UK supermarket, but you'd hardly notice that:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWF2JBb1bvM

That was amazing...

I think it's awe inspiring looking at pictures of World War I war graves and especially and seeing "the crosses, row on row."

It's heart breaking to think how the senior leadership of both countries could so foolishly lead their nations into a pointless conflict - but despite that, amazing moments of humanity shone through - in particular on account of one common bond - faith.

Christmas, though a pagan tradition, had been culturally been adopted by the west as the time to celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ. That is absolutely NOT a subject of debate. I can say with a high degree of certainty that Christmas as the fighting men in the trenches understood it wasn't the consumerist binge and orgy of turkey celebrated with vacuous shallow relationships that Christmas is today. It was a time of prayer, spiritual reflection, and profound family bonding.

I think it's really telling of that era that young men, not their elders in the middle of a war no less, would lay down their arms and celebrate that one profoundly spiritual event with people the authorities were telling them were hated enemies and inhuman monsters worthy of annihilation.

I also think it's a forewarning of the coming conflict for our generation and sets the precedent of what our society can expect WHEN (not if) it goes to war.

Our young men and elders are NOT of the same character as those who crossed no-mans land in 1914. Likewise, as alien as our society is today to the generation that fought World War One - our enemy will be even more foreign.

That's not to say they are better or worse - just different - and I expect that WHEN (not if) war breaks out, there will be no such miracle as happened 100 years ago. The conflict will be brutal, ruthless, unmerciful, and the human toll will be astonishing for centuries to come.

World War 1 was a war between united Christian nations - and the Christmas truce was a completely logical occurrence from the nature of that conflict.

World War 3 will be a war between dis-unified secular nations and competing Islamic sects with weapons, tactics, and strategies of immeasurably destructive capability by World War 1 standards.

For quite some time, I had been rebelling against this outcome - fearing and dreading it, but now I've come to accept it as inevitable.

It's coming - in fact, it HAS to come.

As horrible as they are, wars are societies ways of starting over.

Si vis pacem, para bellum could mean "If you want peace, prepare for war," but I think in our modern vernacular, it could equally mean "Pray for peace, prepare for war."

harbl_the_cat
12-16-2014, 12:43 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silent_Night#Translations

Silent Night
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


In 1859, the Episcopal priest John Freeman Young, then serving at Trinity Church, New York City, published the English translation that is most frequently sung today.[2] The version of the melody that is generally used today is a slow, meditative lullaby, differing slightly (particularly in the final strain) from Gruber's original, which was a sprightly, dance-like tune in 6/8 time. Today, the lyrics and melody are in the public domain.

The carol has been translated into about 140 languages.[3][4]

The song was sung simultaneously in French, English and German by troops during the Christmas truce[5] of 1914 during World War I, as it was one carol that soldiers on both sides of the front line knew.

http://www.metrolyrics.com/silent-night-lyrics-christmas-carols.html

What a sight it must have been for thousands of soldiers singing this:


Silent night, Holy night
All is calm, all is bright
Round yon virgin, mother and child
Holy infant, tender and mild
Sleep in heavenly peace,
Sleep in heavenly peace.

Silent night, Holy night
Son of God, love's pure light
Radiant beams from thy holy face
With the dawn of redeeming grace,
Jesus, Lord at thy birth
Jesus, Lord at thy birth.

Silent night, Holy night
Shepherds quake, at the sight
Glories stream from heaven above
Heavenly, hosts sing Hallelujah.
Christ the Savior is born,
Christ the Savior is born.

kennymo
12-16-2014, 12:57 PM
What a sight it must have been for thousands of soldiers singing this:

There was often talk of how far away things could be heard from during WWI, the simultaneous detonation of large underground 'mines', the firing of the massive railway guns on Paris, etc.... One has to wonder just how far the voices of thousands, spread over miles upon miles of the front line might have been audible from.

Edenchef
12-16-2014, 01:10 PM
There was often talk of how far away things could be heard from during WWI, the simultaneous detonation of large underground 'mines', the firing of the massive railway guns on Paris, etc.... One has to wonder just how far the voices of thousands, spread over miles upon miles of the front line might have been audible from.

In at least four languages.

Cheers!

Laramie Longhorn
12-17-2014, 10:59 AM
It's disheartening that we aren't celebrating this more. With all the stuff going on in the world, a story about humanity breaking through the most inhumane of situations should be foremost in our minds. It proves that people can overcome politics and systems to do what is truly good.