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Canada_Phil
02-07-2015, 05:05 PM
Hello everyone,

I am a long time firearms owner, but new to this forum.

I wanted to bring this up as it happened to my dear friend's wife. He recently passed due to cancer and was a PAL holder with 3 firearms. They were just simple hunting guns with traditional wooden stocks... An over and under shotgun, a .270 bolt action and a simple .22 plinkster.... Certainly no arsenal.

I was blown away that to hear that the police were calling her at home within 48 hours of his passing to inquire about what was to be done with his locked up firearms!?.. Wow!

This is in no way intended to be rant. She had no firearms licence, and I get that something would have to be done with them, but I'm really curious about these events... How does this happen that quickly? All I can guess is that a hospital or coroner's report which would have been normally issued in order to get a death certificate would have triggered this??.. ie his SIN number triggered some flag in a Government system??

Has anyone also experienced this situation before?

SubVet49
02-07-2015, 05:07 PM
All long guns? How would the know? Province Ontario ..... still has the LGR?

Deuce-deuce
02-07-2015, 05:14 PM
There has never been a way for the rcmp to know a firearms owner has passed away... I've bought estates years after, some still on green slips... The queens Cowboys have never been aware until I told them.

Something don't pass the sniff test here.

Canada_Phil
02-07-2015, 05:17 PM
Yes... Just those 3 long guns.

He had had them all his life, but of course HAD the register them for the you know what which is now supposedly gone?

Canada_Phil
02-07-2015, 05:18 PM
Exactly!

How is that even possible?

Neighbour busy-body stirring the pot maybe??

BrotherRockeye
02-07-2015, 05:26 PM
or a "friend" that will "kindly" offer to take possession of them for her.

would be nice to know if anyone offered...out of the blue...

lone-wolf
02-07-2015, 05:28 PM
"none of your business" click.

dakotamar
02-07-2015, 05:31 PM
Of course we all know that the executor of the will does not need a pal to hold those firearms and has a reasonable amount of time to dispose of them or get a PAL.

Canada_Phil
02-07-2015, 05:35 PM
Im not sure about that.... But good point. There ARE a few greedy/cheap relatives in the equation.

Any or all of them were offered to me "ahead of time" as I was his hunting buddy but I graciously declined. I already have what I want and I did not want to take on three more firearms.

They ended up going to her brother.

What I was getting at was trying to understand if there is any known system in place that triggers a database flag on the death of a PAL holder.

blacksmithden
02-07-2015, 05:50 PM
Well...this obviously explains why it takes them so long to process transfers. They're too busy harassing grieving families. What a pile of bulls---. We need to get a government in office that will deal with this kind of harassment just as swiftly, and VERY harshly.

Foxer
02-07-2015, 05:54 PM
All long guns? How would the know? Province Ontario ..... still has the LGR?

He'll still have his gun license. ALmost everyone with a gun license has guns, so I think they just call and say "what's up with the guns" and nobody thinks to question it and just tells them about the guns.

If the person says he didn't have any, no problem, they just say they were checking. But i bet virtually all of them do.

Gunexpert007
02-07-2015, 06:33 PM
The same thing happened to a family here a few years ago . The father had hardly been laid in the ground when the RCMP showed up in person to retrieve a WW2 German Luger that had been a war prize bring back by the father.....but the family was unable to locate the pistol . I always wondered if one of the cops actually wanted the Luger for themselves.....?

blacksmithden
02-07-2015, 08:33 PM
He'll still have his gun license. ALmost everyone with a gun license has guns, so I think they just call and say "what's up with the guns" and nobody thinks to question it and just tells them about the guns.

If the person says he didn't have any, no problem, they just say they were checking. But i bet virtually all of them do.

Train your family before your demise. "There are no guns here. He gave them all to some guy from Canmore years ago...I think his name was Mike." :)

Petamocto
02-07-2015, 10:23 PM
Okay, let's take a step back to look at what factors are at play here, before we go too far down the rabbit hole.

- I don't necessarily think it's bad for the police to follow-up on deceased PAL holders. There is likely a right time to call and two days after the fact likely isn't it, but it's still right to do. If we pride ourselves on being responsible gun owners, then we should care about guns being left around and unsupervised.

- If they actually knew what they were looking for in terms of three precise NR firearms, then there are significant issues at play that need some follow-up.

- As others have mentioned, the simple solution to something like this is having others in your family lined up to pass the baton to. I don't want to disrespect the dead, but as a dad myself I think this guy failed if he died and nobody else around him had a PAL. Heck, Harbl and I are practically populating the country with future PAL holders, so how did this guy not manage to have someone in his will as the person who would take over his firearms?

Edenchef
02-07-2015, 11:00 PM
Well, legally the first thing that should be done is to have a will and appoint an executor. The executor doesn't even have to have a PAL or RPAL. This is one of the few times that is exempt from the firearms acts and regulations. Especially if there are prohibs involved. The executor then secures/possesses the firearms and not even the police can touch them until the estate is settled to the satisfaction of the court. While this is happening the beneficiaries of the will have time to get the necessary permits(RPAL's, 12.x) Without the power of the executor of the will, it is possible that they could be "secured" by the police. Of course once the police have them there are no guarantees.

In my opinion 48 hours is a very short timeframe, very disrespectful and I would not hesitate to tell the police exactly that. If they object, get a lawyer, ASAP and call your MP. I believe that in this case they are hoping that someone caves in easily (emotionally stressed) and just hands over the guns. Remember, the SCC has decided that they are not even required to tell the truth. My guess is you will never see them again. Remember....the Police are NOT there to be your friend. They are first and always....Police.

Cheers!

DeathSpok
02-07-2015, 11:16 PM
I'm wondering how they even knew that the gent was deceased in the first place? Surely the CFO's office doesn't scan the obit pages and cross-reference the names to their database of PAL holders?

Or does an application for a death certificate trigger an automatic cross-check? Even then 48 hours is extremely fast, especially if the death was natural causes and didn't require the coroner to get involved.

Edenchef
02-07-2015, 11:21 PM
I'm wondering how they even knew that the gent was deceased in the first place? Surely the CFO's office doesn't scan the obit pages and cross-reference the names to their database of PAL holders?

Or does an application for a death certificate trigger an automatic cross-check? Even then 48 hours is extremely fast, especially if the death was natural causes and didn't require the coroner to get involved.

Yes, I agree with earlier in the thread. There is a slight odor to this.

Cheers!

DeathSpok
02-07-2015, 11:42 PM
Neighbour busy-body stirring the pot maybe??

There sure are plenty of those around. Trying to find a link to an article about a 80+ year-old vet who'd had his gun confiscated after his home-care nurse saw it and called the cops.


or a "friend" that will "kindly" offer to take possession of them for her.

would be nice to know if anyone offered...out of the blue...


The same thing happened to a family here a few years ago . The father had hardly been laid in the ground when the RCMP showed up in person to retrieve a WW2 German Luger that had been a war prize bring back by the father.....but the family was unable to locate the pistol . I always wondered if one of the cops actually wanted the Luger for themselves.....?

Wouldn't be surprised. I'm pretty sure the customs inspectors at the airport sample some of the contraband yummies they confiscate too.

Foxer
02-08-2015, 01:10 AM
There sure are plenty of those around. Trying to find a link to an article about a 80+ year-old vet who'd had his gun confiscated after his home-care nurse saw it and called the cops.I remember that :) That was quite a while ago, i think you'll have to hit up rangebob to get that one.

RangeBob
02-08-2015, 01:52 AM
There sure are plenty of those around. Trying to find a link to an article about a 80+ year-old vet who'd had his gun confiscated after his home-care nurse saw it and called the cops.

This one?


Korean war veteran, 87, dodges mandatory three-year prison sentence over forgotten 1960s-era pistol

June 13, 2013
Vancouver, British Columbia

Home-care workers were attending the home of an 87-year-old B.C. man recently when they stumbled across a 1960s-era pistol long forgotten in a corner of his apartment.

Im 87 years old, Im not going to go around looking for it, said Lynn Henshaw, a Korean War veteran who has lived in Sidney, B.C., for the past 15 years.

Regardless, an RCMP visit later and Mr. Henshaw was staring down a mandatory three-year prison sentence, the result of Canadas recently toughened gun possession laws.

I knew the gun laws had changed, but I didnt know it was that bad. At 87, you dont pay attention to things like that, he said.

The weapon that landed him in court was a .38 Colt that Mr. Henshaw had purchased when he was the administrator of a college in Maui.

Rather than hire a security guard to shuttle the schools tuition to a bank, he said, he bought a sidearm to do it himself.

I was trying to save money; cut the budget down all it cost me was the price of a .38 Colt, he said.

hxxp://news.nationalpost.com/2013/06/13/korean-war-veteran-87-narrowly-misses-mandatory-three-year-prison-sentence-over-forgotten-1960s-era-pistol/
Photo of elderly man with walker at link.

DeathSpok
02-08-2015, 07:03 AM
This one?

Yup, that's the one, thanks!

Foxer
02-08-2015, 12:11 PM
Told ya :)

But that wasn't even the one I was thinking of - i was thinking of the one where the health care worker refused to go to the guy's place because she found out he had guns in the house (all legally stored)

DeathSpok
02-08-2015, 12:31 PM
Told ya :)

But that wasn't even the one I was thinking of - i was thinking of the one where the health care worker refused to go to the guy's place because she found out he had guns in the house (all legally stored)

Geez, what did she think he was going to do with them?

I know it's natural to fear that which you don't understand, but this is beyond rational fear.

:run: :run: :run: :run: :run: :run: :run: :run: :run: :run:

:smash:

Foxer
02-08-2015, 12:57 PM
Geez, what did she think he was going to do with them?

I know it's natural to fear that which you don't understand, but this is beyond rational fear.

:run: :run: :run: :run: :run: :run: :run: :run: :run: :run:

:smash:
Literally she argued that it was inherently unsafe to work in a place where firearms were present in any form of storage, and that she considered it SO dangerous that she wouldn't work there. The guy didn't threaten her or anything.

Edenchef
02-08-2015, 01:11 PM
Literally she argued that it was inherently unsafe to work in a place where firearms were present in any form of storage, and that she considered it SO dangerous that she wouldn't work there. The guy didn't threaten her or anything.

So, instead she decides to work in the hospital....that's just so much safer. Influenza, Ebola, AIDs. Yup, great decision; liebtarded IQ of a gnat. Yes, this one has drunk the Rock Koolaid deep.

Cheers!

BrotherRockeye
02-08-2015, 01:54 PM
I know it's natural to fear that which you don't understand, but this is beyond rational fear.

:run: :run: :run: :run: :run: :run: :run: :run: :run: :run:

:smash:

that's exactly how I feel about women... :(







;D

Foxer
02-08-2015, 01:56 PM
that's exactly how I feel about women... :(


Yeah, but that IS a rational fear :)

DeathSpok
02-08-2015, 02:04 PM
Yeah, but that IS a rational fear :)

That's only 'cos women are irrational .... :p

Foxer
02-08-2015, 02:10 PM
That's only 'cos women are irrational .... :p

Are you kidding? I'd KILL to date a woman that was only 'irrational' - all the ones I seem to get are more along the lines of 'bat crap crazy' :) (basically I'm eye-candy for nut-bars.)

Petamocto
02-08-2015, 02:14 PM
Don't paint all women with the same brush, mine is awesome.

It takes a man with something to offer to land a woman with something to offer.

wolver
02-08-2015, 03:00 PM
So there's still some people out there that believe the LGR data has been scrapped?:rolleyes:

Edenchef
02-08-2015, 03:38 PM
Are you kidding? I'd KILL to date a woman that was only 'irrational' - all the ones I seem to get are more along the lines of 'bat crap crazy' :) (basically I'm eye-candy for nut-bars.)

Awwwww Man, that is just too easy! ;D Birds of a feather?

Cheers!

Foxer
02-08-2015, 04:43 PM
Awwwww Man, that is just too easy! ;D Birds of a feather?

Cheers!
Yea but i'm 'nuts' in a fun, quirky and entertaining way :) Not in the knife-you-while-you-sleep kinda way like they are :)

BrotherRockeye
02-08-2015, 04:48 PM
Don't paint all women with the same brush, mine is awesome.

It takes a man with something to offer to land a woman with something to offer.

and that same woman can leave you with half of what you had to offer...

Petamocto
02-08-2015, 04:57 PM
and that same woman can leave you with half of what you had to offer...

Sorry, this one has given more to me than she can ever take.

Once your wife supports you through deployments and never gives you anything but support, you don't worry about her leaving when things are going well.

I'm not naive enough to say that relationships never end in divorce; in fact I was divorced at 23. However, when you've had some bad ones you know a keeper when you find one.

Now stop suggesting my wife is anything less than perfect before we both lose our PALs.

TheHydrant
02-08-2015, 06:39 PM
Sorry, this one has given more to me than she can ever take.

Once your wife supports you through deployments and never gives you anything but support, you don't worry about her leaving when things are going well.

I'm not naive enough to say that relationships never end in divorce; in fact I was divorced at 23. However, when you've had some bad ones you know a keeper when you find one.

Now stop suggesting my wife is anything less than perfect before we both lose our PALs.

Applause! :agree:

BrotherRockeye
02-08-2015, 07:25 PM
Sorry, this one has given more to me than she can ever take.

Once your wife supports you through deployments and never gives you anything but support, you don't worry about her leaving when things are going well.

I'm not naive enough to say that relationships never end in divorce; in fact I was divorced at 23. However, when you've had some bad ones you know a keeper when you find one.

Now stop suggesting my wife is anything less than perfect before we both lose our PALs.

Congrats partner, glad that you and the missus are happy!

but I was actually referring to myself, not you...I haven't met the right one yet :(

you do know that marriage is the #1 cause of divorce, right? ;D

Petamocto
02-08-2015, 07:26 PM
Back on topic, bad people suck, hooray!

Drache
02-08-2015, 07:32 PM
1+ for the smell test.

RCMP do not know of people's deaths. There have been times when they go to a place to look for someone and find out the person they want to talk to has been dead for years. Hell Governments many times don't figure out people are dead and next thing next of kin know they are getting an overdue notice on income tax for someone who is dead.

Edenchef
02-08-2015, 08:23 PM
1+ for the smell test.

RCMP do not know of people's deaths. There have been times when they go to a place to look for someone and find out the person they want to talk to has been dead for years. Hell Governments many times don't figure out people are dead and next thing next of kin know they are getting an overdue notice on income tax for someone who is dead.

I agree, the source was almost certainly someone close to this. Nosy neighbor, impatient beneficiary, someone like that. Someone with something to gain from the guns being grabbed. JMHO

Cheers!

Malus
02-09-2015, 11:22 AM
If all firearms owners are in a national database (with the pedos), it would be easy to link a death certificate associated with that individual/name. Btw, this is why both my father and mother have their licenses as does my wife, so that if either of us passes, there will be no issue about the guns (a least in the beginning).....

infidel29
02-09-2015, 01:09 PM
Regarding that Korean war vet, at 87 years old, my give a #### would be so broken, it'd be epic....

RimfireFans
02-09-2015, 07:43 PM
You're darn right there's something stinky going on here.

Following a death the family will contact a funeral home to pick up the body. A medical certificate of death will then be given to the funeral director who must then fill out a statement of death. Those are then filed with Vital Statistics. This takes more than 48 hours!

In some provinces, once a death has been filed with Vital Statistics then Service Canada is automatically notified. No province is mentioned but either way this stinks of a family member or "friend" calling the RCMP and whining.

Petamocto
02-09-2015, 07:48 PM
Hey Canada Phil the original poster, how about an update?

Candychikita
02-10-2015, 01:43 AM
and that same woman can leave you with half of what you had to offer...

It goes both ways Brother... builds character and empathy though :D


Hell Governments many times don't figure out people are dead and next thing next of kin know they are getting an overdue notice on income tax for someone who is dead.

Unless it happened within the year of the death, I'd have to say false on that one coming out of the blue. Part of the process for estates is filing the last tax return - you ASK for the particulars of the deceased persons' tax situation so it can be paid, or the executor/administrator is liable for paying it themselves. It is part of the job you agree to undertake when you agree to be executor...

Sounds like someone called in a safety concern of some sort to the RCMP vs them actually finding out through a cross referenced database.

Drache
02-10-2015, 07:45 AM
Unless it happened within the year of the death, I'd have to say false on that one coming out of the blue. Part of the process for estates is filing the last tax return - you ASK for the particulars of the deceased persons' tax situation so it can be paid, or the executor/administrator is liable for paying it themselves. It is part of the job you agree to undertake when you agree to be executor...

Happened with my grandfather's estate. A year after his passing, a letter came from Canada Revenue stating my grandfather was behind on his income tax and needed to contact them immediately about settling the debt.

Don't trust Canada Revenue. They decided to audit a couple in BC who ran an RV camp ground. The couple sent in all the required paperwork. Canada Revenue accidentally shredded the couples paperwork. They then told they couple since they didn't have any paperwork for the couple, they estimated the couple owed them $1,000,000. The couple had to sell the business, their home, everything to pay fees and lawyers. Wasn't until many years later the Government admitted they figured out that the couple should have been paid $17,000 instead of fined $1,000,000. By that time the couple was bankrupt.

awndray
02-10-2015, 07:53 AM
Here's a good resource for the OP. http://www.gunownersofcanada.ca/showthread.php?18160-Executor-Firearms

As for what happened, I'm sure there's more to the story.

Candychikita
02-10-2015, 11:47 AM
Happened with my grandfather's estate. A year after his passing, a letter came from Canada Revenue stating my grandfather was behind on his income tax and needed to contact them immediately about settling the debt.

Don't trust Canada Revenue. They decided to audit a couple in BC who ran an RV camp ground. The couple sent in all the required paperwork. Canada Revenue accidentally shredded the couples paperwork. They then told they couple since they didn't have any paperwork for the couple, they estimated the couple owed them $1,000,000. The couple had to sell the business, their home, everything to pay fees and lawyers. Wasn't until many years later the Government admitted they figured out that the couple should have been paid $17,000 instead of fined $1,000,000. By that time the couple was bankrupt.

Interesting. Sounds like someone F'd up. Either your grandpa's estate proceedings or on the CRA's side. Did the executor/administrator pay the bill or was it an auditing error?

The CRA gets certified copies and audits are done on location. Original documentation is not supposed to leave your records office, as it can sometimes be your only recourse for justice. I may be a sweetheart most of the time but I draw the line at someone messing with my original documents or my kids.

BrotherRockeye
02-10-2015, 12:54 PM
It goes both ways Brother... builds character and empathy though :D

Not for some of us Cc.
When I met and married my ex-wife she had nothing but debt (that I paid off). 10 yrs later she has a career and makes a lot of money, 4 times my income...I gave up a 20yr career and pension to stay home with the young ones and run the ranch.
I asked for nothing, she still wants more.
I have more character in the end of my dik than she'll ever dream of having.

sorry...off topic...

Gunexpert007
02-10-2015, 01:06 PM
You're darn right there's something stinky going on here.

Following a death the family will contact a funeral home to pick up the body. A medical certificate of death will then be given to the funeral director who must then fill out a statement of death. Those are then filed with Vital Statistics. This takes more than 48 hours!

In some provinces, once a death has been filed with Vital Statistics then Service Canada is automatically notified. No province is mentioned but either way this stinks of a family member or "friend" calling the RCMP and whining.

It may have been a case of someone calling the RCMP for whatever reason , or it may have been a case of a local cop knowing that the gentleman had firearms , and when he learned of the guys death , he thought he would earn some brownie points by tracking down the firearms quickly ......there are lots of RCMP members who have drank the Alan Rock Kool-Aid , and do not believe that Canadian citizens should have access to firearms for any reason.....

Deuce-deuce
02-10-2015, 01:38 PM
I have more character in the end of my dik than she'll ever dream of having.

sorry...off topic...
You might want to see a doctor.

BrotherRockeye
02-10-2015, 02:30 PM
You might want to see a doctor.

No need...although I did my best to get some of it to rub off on her! ;D

I've been close to a similar situation to the OP, which is why I suggested the conspiracy theory.
It was a nephew who started the ball rolling in the case I watched unfold.
He ended up with 1 of the 6 firearms in the end...the Daughter (executrix) was a lot more understanding than I would have been.

Canada_Phil
02-10-2015, 04:06 PM
Hey Canada Phil the original poster, how about an update?

I stopped paying attention as the topic seemed to degenerate into rants about women.

Anyway, there are only two explanations the way I see it...

1) A neighbour or relative stirred the pot.

2) The filing of a Death Certificate actually DOES trigger! an electronic flag with Service Canada that sends an electronic report to a local Police detachment for followup. There were no other registered PAL holders at the address in question and this was small town Ontario where I could easily see this happening.

I don't see why #2 is not possible. After all, the Government now uses the above scenario as a means to stop the pension deposits on the death of pensioners who happen to be on automated bank transfers. I mean, SIN numbers ARE required pieces of info when we applied for our PAL's are they not??

BrotherRockeye
02-10-2015, 04:23 PM
I stopped paying attention as the topic seemed to degenerate into rants about women.

My bad here, sorry... :)
It does happen a lot around here though... My magpul thread turned into a beowulf mag thread...

Deuce-deuce
02-10-2015, 10:14 PM
I stopped paying attention as the topic seemed to degenerate into rants about women.

Anyway, there are only two explanations the way I see it...

1) A neighbour or relative stirred the pot.

2) The filing of a Death Certificate actually DOES trigger! an electronic flag with Service Canada that sends an electronic report to a local Police detachment for followup. There were no other registered PAL holders at the address in question and this was small town Ontario where I could easily see this happening.

I don't see why #2 is not possible. After all, the Government now uses the above scenario as a means to stop the pension deposits on the death of pensioners who happen to be on automated bank transfers. I mean, SIN numbers ARE required pieces of info when we applied for our PAL's are they not??
It's not that it's not possible... They just haven't done it in the past.
I wouldn't put it past the rcmp. I'm just not sure it would be legal, privacy act?
I don't recall using my sin number... But I do forget a lot of stuff.

My bad here, sorry... :)
It does happen a lot around here though... My magpul thread turned into a beowulf mag thread...
If your .223 turned into a .50... It's not a doctor you need. Maybe an accountant??? That's something men have been searching for since we've been on two feet.

DeathSpok
02-10-2015, 11:01 PM
I mean, SIN numbers ARE required pieces of info when we applied for our PAL's are they not??

Pretty sure they're not.

RobSmith
02-10-2015, 11:22 PM
Want to bet that an "anonymous call" was placed by a "concerned citizen" that "she wasn't doing well" and that there are guns in the house where she lived with the deceased... Smells like somebody wanted to make sure she couldn't sell off the guns. Automated checkup is possible also, there are persistent "rumors" that CPIC and such goes thru the list of PAL/RPAL holders on a daily basis as part of it's automated routine. Depending on the circumstances under which the deceased passed it's not impossible that this would trigger a CPIC entry that would then be flagged during the PAL check.

BrotherRockeye
02-10-2015, 11:59 PM
You might want to see a doctor.



If your .223 turned into a .50... It's not a doctor you need. Maybe an accountant??? That's something men have been searching for since we've been on two feet.

Help me out here cuz I can't decide...are you being a comedian or a troll?

Deuce-deuce
02-11-2015, 12:22 AM
Help me out here cuz I can't decide...are you being a comedian or a troll?

I suppose a little of both... I have added useful information.

BrotherRockeye
02-11-2015, 12:52 AM
I suppose a little of both... I have added useful information.

good answer ;D

Candychikita
02-11-2015, 03:09 PM
I stopped paying attention as the topic seemed to degenerate into rants about women.

Anyway, there are only two explanations the way I see it...

1) A neighbour or relative stirred the pot.

2) The filing of a Death Certificate actually DOES trigger! an electronic flag with Service Canada that sends an electronic report to a local Police detachment for followup. There were no other registered PAL holders at the address in question and this was small town Ontario where I could easily see this happening.

I don't see why #2 is not possible. After all, the Government now uses the above scenario as a means to stop the pension deposits on the death of pensioners who happen to be on automated bank transfers. I mean, SIN numbers ARE required pieces of info when we applied for our PAL's are they not??

I'm not certain about other provinces, but the Vital Statistics Agency here in BC is just basically a giant repository of information that grants certificates for legal purposes. It's basically a library. They code it, catalogue it, and then pull it up as requested. There currently ISN'T any sort of flagging system attached, and fully digitizing this department would eliminate a lot of jobs (and make it easier to print your own certificates)...this is government we are talking here heh. When you die, your bank accounts/credit accounts/mortgage still acrue interest...you still have to pay taxes...someone has to deal with your remains and settle your estate.

Someone has to ASK for your death certificate from Vital Statistics or a funeral home director has to create one (and a deposition permit to get rid of the carcass)...the doctors administer a medical certificate within 48 hours of your death that is registered with Vital Statistics and that's about it.

I don't recall entering my SIN number on my firearms application to be honest, so I don't think that's a current link. Here in BC they are trying to combine the Drivers License with your Care Card (medical) but I'm resistant to that personally for ID theft reasons. I've always paid my MSP (medical) up front, so I've never seen it removed off my taxes at the end of the year...I'm not certain there is a link between these government agencies either.

https://www.vs.gov.bc.ca/death/
https://www.vs.gov.bc.ca/death/howto.html

It might be different in ON though.

RimfireFans
02-11-2015, 05:05 PM
2) The filing of a Death Certificate actually DOES trigger! an electronic flag with Service Canada that sends an electronic report to a local Police detachment for followup. There were no other registered PAL holders at the address in question and this was small town Ontario where I could easily see this happening.

It does, but my comments suggest that it would take longer than 48 hours for this to process.


I mean, SIN numbers ARE required pieces of info when we applied for our PAL's are they not??

Nope. However when you take your test you are asked for a piece of identification. That information is copied onto the application. If he would have gotten his pal/pol years ago and it may not have had that requirement then. I know when I first applied for my FAC the forms were pretty light on the required info.

RangeBob
02-12-2015, 12:26 AM
Application for a Possession and Acquisition Licence Under the Firearms Act (For Individuals Aged 18 and Over)
http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/form-formulaire/pdfs/5592-eng.pdf

Candychikita
02-12-2015, 01:55 AM
You're a rockstar Rangebob.

DethMyst
03-14-2015, 08:37 PM
Hello everyone,

I am a long time firearms owner, but new to this forum.

I wanted to bring this up as it happened to my dear friend's wife. He recently passed due to cancer and was a PAL holder with 3 firearms. They were just simple hunting guns with traditional wooden stocks... An over and under shotgun, a .270 bolt action and a simple .22 plinkster.... Certainly no arsenal.

I was blown away that to hear that the police were calling her at home within 48 hours of his passing to inquire about what was to be done with his locked up firearms!?.. Wow!

This is in no way intended to be rant. She had no firearms licence, and I get that something would have to be done with them, but I'm really curious about these events... How does this happen that quickly? All I can guess is that a hospital or coroner's report which would have been normally issued in order to get a death certificate would have triggered this??.. ie his SIN number triggered some flag in a Government system??

Has anyone also experienced this situation before?

Personally I think this is a great move by the police. I'm sure suicide rates are much higher among individuals who's spouse had recently passed. It's a good move to get any firearms out of the house ASAP. Not sure I'm making many friends with this comment, but if I cared for someone who's husband recently passed, I'd want the firearms out of her house while she's feeling very down and depressed the following days of that passing.

kennymo
03-14-2015, 10:16 PM
Personally I think this is a great move by the police. I'm sure suicide rates are much higher among individuals who's spouse had recently passed. It's a good move to get any firearms out of the house ASAP. Not sure I'm making many friends with this comment, but if I cared for someone who's husband recently passed, I'd want the firearms out of her house while she's feeling very down and depressed the following days of that passing.

Statistics wise we're shown that there it makes no difference. It was touted as a major selling point of C-68, reduction in suicide. And the anti gunners will frequently point out that suicide by gun dropped somewhat after all the licensing, registration, back ground checks, etc... came into effect. What they don't like to mention is that suicide by other means (jumping off bridges, hangings, etc...) increased by the same amount suicide by gun decreased.

While I don't disagree that if a person is known to be thinking of doing harm to themselves should have their firearms temporarily removed, by itself it's not a life saving measure. Support and close watch by family and friends is probably a far better solution than just arbitrarily removing an object....

BrotherRockeye
03-14-2015, 11:02 PM
Statistics wise we're shown that there it makes no difference. It was touted as a major selling point of C-68, reduction in suicide. And the anti gunners will frequently point out that suicide by gun dropped somewhat after all the licensing, registration, back ground checks, etc... came into effect. What they don't like to mention is that suicide by other means (jumping off bridges, hangings, etc...) increased by the same amount suicide by gun decreased.

While I don't disagree that if a person is known to be thinking of doing harm to themselves should have their firearms temporarily removed, by itself it's not a life saving measure. Support and close watch by family and friends is probably a far better solution than just arbitrarily removing an object....

took the words right out of my brain

blacksmithden
03-15-2015, 12:22 AM
I just finished having a talk with my wife about what to do if something happened to me and the cops try to lie their way into getting her to turn over my guns. I explained to her that as executor of my will, she can legally hold my guns even through she doesn't have a license, and can sell them as she sees fit. I also told her that the cops will sometimes outright lie and tell her that she can be charged with illegal possession if she doesn't surrender them. I told her to tell them to go fly a kite, and to contact my buddy to help her with pricing and selling. I'd highly recommend all of you do the same thing with your spouses if they're not licensed and don't know what the real laws are with regard to a gun owners estate.