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762shooter
08-07-2015, 12:00 AM
A year or so ago we had a discussion about the state of the Canadian navy, how many "warships" we actually had, capabilities, etc. Here is an article that lays it all out. Not pretty!

http://www.macleans.ca/news/canada/the-sinking-of-the-canadian-navy/

Doug_M
08-07-2015, 04:26 AM
The problem with Canada and her Navy is that we foolishly go through 30-40 year cycles where we resurrect a dead industry (warship building) and have it build a fleet over about a decade. Once that fleet is built we sail it for 30-35 years until it is completely broken down and incapable. Then we resurrect a dead industry...

Other nations (Germany and the Netherlands come to mind) don't do that. They design a class of warship and build and improve it over decades, always commissioning a new vessel every couple of years. The fleet ends up with a broad range of ages rather than every ship being the same age and the warship class gets improved over the years as they learn. Plus the warship building industry, while smaller than the one we resurrect every few decades, is continuously employed and highly skilled.

Now the problem is how do we transition to that model. Well we never will as it would require buying some warships "off the shelf" to sustain the Navy's requirements while getting going with the scaled down but continuous building of our own warships. No politician is going to do that.

I had the good fortune to be in the Navy at a time when the Halifax class frigates were brand new. That was a proud time. We truly did have some of the best frigates in the world. But that lead didn't last long. And guess who passed us first? Germany, with their incremental approach.

RobertMcC
08-07-2015, 04:26 AM
They lost HMCS Iroquois a Destroyer this year too. Due to severe rust on the hull.

oilman28
08-07-2015, 12:35 PM
The problem with Canada and her Navy is that we foolishly go through 30-40 year cycles where we resurrect a dead industry (warship building) and have it build a fleet over about a decade. Once that fleet is built we sail it for 30-35 years until it is completely broken down and incapable. Then we resurrect a dead industry...

Other nations (Germany and the Netherlands come to mind) don't do that. They design a class of warship and build and improve it over decades, always commissioning a new vessel every couple of years. The fleet ends up with a broad range of ages rather than every ship being the same age and the warship class gets improved over the years as they learn. Plus the warship building industry, while smaller than the one we resurrect every few decades, is continuously employed and highly skilled.

Now the problem is how do we transition to that model. Well we never will as it would require buying some warships "off the shelf" to sustain the Navy's requirements while getting going with the scaled down but continuous building of our own warships. No politician is going to do that.

I had the good fortune to be in the Navy at a time when the Halifax class frigates were brand new. That was a proud time. We truly did have some of the best frigates in the world. But that lead didn't last long. And guess who passed us first? Germany, with their incremental approach.
Why not just buy warships from the United states or Germany? Just have it set up like when the airforce ordered those c17 transports, they just added onto the usaf order. Plus it would be cheaper in the long run.

Doug_M
08-07-2015, 12:56 PM
Why not just buy warships from the United states or Germany? Just have it set up like when the airforce ordered those c17 transports, they just added onto the usaf order. Plus it would be cheaper in the long run.
Politics. People want jobs and politicians want to provide them with big fanfare. We've had opportunities to buy warships and subs from the US (they're downsizing and have X number of excess frigates for example) in the past but the gov (both parties) never goes for it.

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk

RobertMcC
08-07-2015, 01:32 PM
I mean Christopher Stannix ferry they just build last year, already came out of the water for prop issues.

spider69
06-10-2019, 06:44 PM
It's election year,so,here we are 4 years later. What's changed?

RobertMcC
06-10-2019, 06:47 PM
It's election year,so,here we are 4 years later. What's changed?

Nadda.. More budget cuts..