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J_mcrane
09-21-2015, 06:52 PM
My wife and I are immigrating from the US. I am looking for info about bringing our 2013 Toyota Sequoia up with us. I am wondering if I can bring it up with financing and what would need to be changed to meet government regulations. Any help or info would be appreciated.
Jm


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Foxer
09-21-2015, 07:17 PM
Which province are you going to?

CaperJim
09-21-2015, 07:19 PM
Which province are you going to?

The one with the least restrictions on vehicle importation :p

J_mcrane
09-21-2015, 07:27 PM
Alberta


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Foxer
09-21-2015, 07:33 PM
i don't know that one as well but i think it's pretty easy .I think you just have to get it inspected. someone from alberta can probably fill you in.

Haywire1
09-21-2015, 07:34 PM
Either way it is going to need daytime running lights, and an out of country inspection done after its here before you can register it. That is country wide, no escape. Financing youll have to ask your banker about, noone here is going to have a clue. After its inspected, then you need registration and insurance. The reason the province is important is in Alberta, you need to have insurance on the vehicle before you register it, in b.c. and s.k. there is govt insurance so registration and insurance is done at the same time.

Forbes/Hutton
09-21-2015, 07:59 PM
You'd best talk with whoever is financing it now, either they will continue to do so or they might have a Canadian partner.

You will need daytime running lights, a 3rd centre brake light if the Canadian version has one and a speedometer with metric markings (dual metric/imperial is fine). The inspections can be done at most Canadian Tire locations (a big chain up here, almost every town and all cities have one). For taxes (or the paperwork to avoid them) I would talk to CBSA and see what then require in the way of documents.

Zinilin
09-21-2015, 08:56 PM
Any warranty may not come with you. Many manufactures put roadblocks to buying in the US and shipping/driving to Canada.
The US and Canadian governments (and the states/provinces) similarly discourage movement through 'non-tariff' barriers (metric/standard; emissions; lighting; tinting; taxes; etc.).
You may find it simpler, easier, faster and less expensive to just sell there and buy here.

blacksmithden
09-21-2015, 09:51 PM
There are no emission checks here in Alberta, so you should be ok with that. If you were going to a province WITH emission testing...oh brother....there have been many horror stories about the government computers no acknowledging US serial numbers....a friend of mine had to install catalytic converters on an SUV he bought on Ebay and drove up from Arizona. Anyway.......Other than that, as stated before...out of province/country vehicle inspection is required, as well as proof of insurance before they will sell you license plates. Alberta is pretty easy going on stuff like this. You may have to pay tax on it at the border, or there might be an exemption since it's been your vehicle for a while. Call the Canadian Border Services Agency (CBSA) and ask them. Thats the only way you'll know for sure. We're the only province without a provincial sales tax/harmonized sales tax, so the only thing they can hit you with is 5% goods and sales tax (GST) as far as I know.

Oh...and...welcome aboard. :)

coastal
09-21-2015, 10:19 PM
You need to export the vehicle at US customs, and you have to file your export paper work 72hrs before you plan to cross and cross at the border you sent the paper work to. It takes about 5 minutes for the export process, they might not even look at the car.

After that, Canadian customs will only want any gst they can collect, you fill out an importation form at the border they do some stamping and send you on your way.

shootemup604
09-22-2015, 10:32 AM
http://www.riv.ca/

killer kane
10-10-2015, 09:50 AM
There are no emission checks here in Alberta, so you should be ok with that. If you were going to a province WITH emission testing...oh brother....there have been many horror stories about the government computers no acknowledging US serial numbers....a friend of mine had to install catalytic converters on an SUV he bought on Ebay and drove up from Arizona. Anyway.......Other than that, as stated before...out of province/country vehicle inspection is required, as well as proof of insurance before they will sell you license plates. Alberta is pretty easy going on stuff like this. You may have to pay tax on it at the border, or there might be an exemption since it's been your vehicle for a while. Call the Canadian Border Services Agency (CBSA) and ask them. Thats the only way you'll know for sure. We're the only province without a provincial sales tax/harmonized sales tax, so the only thing they can hit you with is 5% goods and sales tax (GST) as far as I know.

Oh...and...welcome aboard. :)

No emission checks....Yet.:Bang head::popcorn:

Justice
10-10-2015, 01:34 PM
Vehicle importation is Federal. Vehicle licencing etc is Provincial. I believe we have a thing called Settler's Effects that covers your property. You really need to talk to Immigration to be sure though.
Like Haywire1 says, you'll have to talk to whoever financed it. Likely need to do some kind of a loan transfer or otherwise pay them off sooner vs later.

Metric Warrior
10-11-2015, 06:26 PM
http://www.riv.ca/

This is the place you need.
Great choice on a province to move to. :)

Foxer
10-11-2015, 07:03 PM
Great choice on a province to move to. :)

Yes. Provided he's moving in 3.5 years :)

SIR VEYOR
10-11-2015, 07:58 PM
You need to export the vehicle at US customs, and you have to file your export paper work 72hrs before you plan to cross and cross at the border you sent the paper work to. It takes about 5 minutes for the export process, they might not even look at the car.

After that, Canadian customs will only want any gst they can collect, you fill out an importation form at the border they do some stamping and send you on your way.

GST you should be exempt from with the right incoming goods form.

The 72hr is a minimum, but they've made it on-line mandatory now. So long as you know your date and crossing, you can fioe it much earlier.
For exporting as a US citizen, you won't need a broker for any of it, but the online registration is a bit of work to get through first time.

There's a couple of threads here similar to this that might help a bit as well.

Depending on the code reader, you might be able to engage the DRLs yourself, or they might already be set that way.

It's not all that complicated, just time consuming and remember your deadlines\submission order.

cybershooters
10-13-2015, 06:30 PM
My wife and I are immigrating from the US. I am looking for info about bringing our 2013 Toyota Sequoia up with us. I am wondering if I can bring it up with financing

Short answer no, you can't do it if you don't hold the title. For a variety of legal reasons I could bore you with, but the dealer won't let you do it either if you read the fine print of your financing agreement. Pretty much invariably there is a clause in there that prohibits export, one of the reasons being they have a harder time coming after you if you don't keep up with the payments. But this is a fairly moot point because you can't complete the import paperwork without title to the vehicle, only they can do it and they won't.

The way around it is to get a bank loan from a Canadian bank, buy the car, get the title and then pay back the loan. Assuming your financing deal makes that possible but it can be a good idea to do it because the car is cheaper than buying a replacement up here.

Once you've got the title then you can follow the procedure on www.riv.ca - in 2008 there was a major stink about US car manufacturers having minor differences to make importing cars into Canada difficult, so since then the major manufacturers agreed to make the cars as similar as possible, so most US cars now have DRLs and there are no changes required.

It is a major PITA to go through all the paperwork though, be warned. Cars valued at more than CAD$10,000 are still subject to GST and possibly duty (unlikely due to NAFTA). Also CBP now has a new export declaration system which makes it even harder than it used to be. This is all explained in detail at www.riv.ca but your head will be dizzy by the time you've done the CBP clearance, sent in the safety recall letter to Sweet Grass 48 hours prior, done the Form 1 at Coutts, got the clearance, gone to a registry office to get the inspection paperwork, gone to Canadian Tire to do the Federal and provincial inspection, gone back to the registry with the inspection clearance to register it and also sent in the federal paperwork to get the sticker.

Bear in mind the car has to be in your possession at least a year to be considered a "personal effect". Also the parking space at Sweet Grass on the US side is hard to make out, it's some concrete blocks lined up on the left-hand side of the lane about 100m before you get to Canadian primary inspection.

And once you're in Canada, you can't buy a car in the US if the franchise agreement doesn't allow it, which is the case with most but not all manufacturers (Ford allows it, some others do). This is a bone of contention in Canada, however it is legal. There is nothing in the Civil Rights Act about requiring a car dealer to sell you a car. They don't have to sell a car to anyone they don't want to and the franchise agreements often don't allow cars to be sold for export.

There is an argument it violates a commerce provision in the Commerce Act or whatever it's called but no-one has ever tested it in court.

cybershooters
10-13-2015, 06:30 PM
i don't know that one as well but i think it's pretty easy

You think wrong, try doing it!

cybershooters
10-13-2015, 06:36 PM
Actually thinking about it, one of the things that is useful is your insurance history going back 7 years. Unfortunately for me I'd changed insurer nearly every year and it was a frigging nightmare getting all that paperwork together. The more years you have with no claims, the better your insurance rate will be. Problem is you have to get that paperwork together because the insurer(s) are foreign.

CaperJim
10-13-2015, 06:55 PM
Anyone know about importing a vehicle from overseas? I see there's new Ladas out, built in Izhevsk.. ever hear of there? :p

J_mcrane
10-13-2015, 07:01 PM
Thank you all for your advice and help. I go back and forth between taking our vehicle or getting one when we are up there. I'm excited about the prospect.


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Booletsnotreactwell
10-15-2015, 11:14 PM
You will need daytime running lights, a 3rd centre brake light if the Canadian version has one and a speedometer with metric markings (dual metric/imperial is fine).

As far as vehicle modifications go, they'll likely be none. Most of the time these thing are built in plants (sometimes in Canada) and they just put ALL the safety features to make it more simple for production, things like DRL used to be installed and disabled on U.S. cars by simply not filling the fuse on the fuse block for them. I'm almost convinced that U.S. laws now mandate them as well.

Every single car now is gonna have DRL's or some option that allows the front lights to be on all the time at low power. Center high mount stop lights have been on cars since the late 80's along with clutch interlock, gear shifting lock (you have to press the brake to change gears), etc...

I dare anyone here to find a 2015 vehicle that's sold in the U.S. that wouldn't meet safety here stock (as in having to do something more than install a fuse).

NZClaybuster
12-11-2015, 10:22 PM
Call Aileen Gibb at cross border trading. She has been in this business at least fifteen years