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Foxer
09-29-2015, 06:00 PM
NDP sets sights on Trudeau in bid to recapture momentum

With their political momentum apparently stalled, the New Democrats plan to launch a course correction, shifting their strategy with a recalibrated campaign that includes sharper attacks on Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau.

CBC News has learned that the NDP, now appearing to trail in the polls, will be buying more broadcast ads in an attempt to blunt Trudeau's rise in Quebec, a province where it's crucial for the party to at least retain its seat count for any hopes of a victory.



Not only can Canadians expect to see more ads, but the NDP plans to intensify campaigning in the days ahead, which includes more touring in southwestern Ontario.
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Mulcair: 'I leave the pomp to you Justin'0:32

This new strategy would move away from comparing NDP policy with the Liberal plans and instead highlight the issue of leadership — who would make the best prime minister.

The idea is to demonstrate Tom Mulcair is a stronger leader than Trudeau, to knock down his support a few points and to reduce the Liberal leader's likability quotient in English Canada.
Anti-Trudeau radio ads

To that end, the party has just launched a series of anti-Trudeau radio ads, which include attacking the Liberal leader over his support for C-51, the controversial anti-terrorism legislation that gives more power to Canada's security forces.

The other ads accuse Trudeau of being hostile to the auto and manufacturing sectors and slam him for charging thousands of dollars of speaking fees for appearances at school boards and charities.

As for Quebec, the NDP believes it has been hurt by the so-called niqab issue and opposition to the Conservative government's ban on wearing the face veil while taking the Canadian citizenship oath. Polls suggest a vast majority of Canadians support the Tories on this issue, but the strongest support is in Quebec.

The party is hoping to turn the attention of Quebecers away from the niqab issue and back to what it sees as the most significant ballot question — whether Quebec voters want Conservative Leader Stephen Harper to remain as prime minister.

The NDP slide comes weeks after Mulcair kicked off his "campaign for change," running what many perceived as a traditional front-runner's race. Just last weekend, Mulcair was telling CBC's Chris Hall of The House that he was consulting with experts and preparing to form a minority government after the Oct. 19 election.

But recent polls suggest the NDP's political fortunes, especially the momentum it had in Quebec, has since softened.

After weeks of the Conservatives, Liberals and NDP in a virtual tie, the CBC Poll Tracker now shows the widest gap between first and third place since Sept. 8.

CBC polling analyst Éric Grenier says the numbers show the NDP slipping to the third sport behind the Liberals, whose support appears to be holding steady. He said voters who are more concerned about defeating Harper than they are for voting for the party of their choice could decide to flock to the Liberals.

The cause of the softening of support may be hard to discern. Mulcair has been critical of the Clarity Act legislation that calls for a "clear majority" result if Quebec were to vote on secession. Instead, he has championed the NDP's own unity bill that would recognize a referendum victory by the yes side, even if it were by a majority of 50 per cent plus one, a position that presumably would gain him support among sovereigntists.
Opposition to ISIS mission

He has also opposed Bill-C51 and Canada's military mission against ISIS in Iraq, which involves airstrikes and training local ground troops. Mulcair has vowed to bring home all Canadians from that mission.

On the first issue, Mulcair is likely on side with many Quebecers, but it's unclear if his opposition to the ISIS mission is also resonating in the province, which traditionally shows the least support for military action. Indeed, Bloc Québécois Leader Gilles Duceppe has come out strongly in support of military intervention.

Although Mulcair's opposition to the Conservative ban on the niqab may have hurt the NDP's standing in Quebec, it's not clear why the issue hasn't also affected Trudeau, also an opponent to the ban, who has arguably been more vocal about it.

It's possible that Mulcair has been stung by repeated criticisms from both Trudeau and Duceppe that Mulcair is a political opportunist and has flip-flopped on a number of issues. Both claim that Mulcair takes one position for a Calgary audience and another while speaking in Quebec, a charge Mulcair has denied.

But the drop in support may also suggest that the Orange Wave that took hold in Quebec and propelled Jack Layton into the role of the Official Opposition leader was built in large part to Layton's personality, something Mulcair has been unable to replicate.

Foxer
09-29-2015, 06:11 PM
It had to happen. As I said many moons ago in the end this is going to boil down to a fight in quebec between the libs and dips as one of the premier battlegrounds of the election. And if the dips pull back resources to reinforce quebec, the libs will be pressured to do the same. This will weaken their efforts elsewhere, which works for us. Ontario will still be a fight but that's a fight the CPC can win, especially if the ndp and libs are slagging each other (which always has a negative effect on voter turn out. Something that will be a major factor in this election most likely).

Lets hope the gloves really come off and tommy gives him what fer and they drag each other down.

Swampdonkey
09-29-2015, 06:16 PM
Good that these two are slagging each other, exposing the faults of progressive politics and keeping pressure off the CPC.

RangeBob
09-29-2015, 06:21 PM
Mulcair: Harper is an evil disgusting power mongering bad economist without the personal charm of an accountant with delusions of demigod-ery. Trudeau is worse.

Justin: Harper is an evil disgusting power mongering bad economist without the personal charm of an accountant with delusions of demigod-ery. Mulcair is worse.

RangeBob
09-29-2015, 06:23 PM
The other ads accuse Trudeau of being hostile to the auto and manufacturing sectors and slam him for charging thousands of dollars of speaking fees for appearances at school boards and charities.

I thought that was how he became Liberal Party leader.
They sent him forth to see if he could raise a million dollars for the Liberal Party, and when he did he bought his way into the leadership, on the backs of children and the poor.
Isn't that some sort of Liberal tradition?

soulchaser
09-29-2015, 06:31 PM
Although Mulcair's opposition to the Conservative ban on the niqab may have hurt the NDP's standing in Quebec, it's not clear why the issue hasn't also affected Trudeau, also an opponent to the ban, who has arguably been more vocal about it."


It kind of has though.

The polls show increases for the Libs in Quebec, but they are small and within the polls margin of error - IE Abacus' Sept 27th poll had them up 2 points (24%) since their last poll on Sept 11th (22%). How do we know they weren't up 6 or 7 before the debate and lost 3 or 4 points after the debate?

And those same polls show the CPC in Quebec up 10 or 11 points since the debates.

Gaidheal
09-30-2015, 05:39 AM
I saw an NDP ad last night. focus was on Mulcair being ready now.

I LOL'd

R&R Rancher
09-30-2015, 05:43 AM
If that's the best they can come up with, they should expect to lose their status as the official opposition after the next election.

RangeBob
09-30-2015, 05:59 AM
they should expect to lose their status as the official opposition after the next election.
[sarcasm]
Remember the good ol days in 1993-1997 (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_federal_election,_1993) when The Bloc was the opposition, and couch politicos used to wile away the keystrokes wondering if their existence was treasonous. A little over a decade later, 2011, and they lost official party status.

Mark-II
09-30-2015, 06:02 AM
I like how this CBC article chokes and can't state that the conservatives are in the lead, but only alludes to it.

The butthurt is palpable.

savage300wsm
09-30-2015, 11:57 PM
NDP add out tonight getting nasty but going after Harper. Basically showing all the senators that got into trouble and calling the[I] government corrupt.

Really had that dirty low low tactic to it. They must be getting desperate when this stuff starts showing up.

Mark-II
10-01-2015, 10:12 AM
NDP add out tonight getting nasty but going after Harper. Basically showing all the senators that got into trouble and calling the[I] government corrupt.

Really had that dirty low low tactic to it. They must be getting desperate when this stuff starts showing up.

And will the media shame them for using "Amurican style campaigning?" or even take a dig and call it Conservative Style Campaigning?

Or will there be crickets

I can hear the chirping now lol.

I'll take a few corrupt senators and leave the silver-spoon man-boy and the angry progressive with the hidden agenda on the shelf, thanks.