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View Full Version : Top 100 Items to Disappear First During a National Emergency



jwirecom109
07-03-2012, 10:35 AM
1. Generators(Good ones cost dearly. Gas storage, risky. Noisy…target of thieves; maintenance etc.)
2. Water Filters/Purifiers
3. Portable Toilets
4. Seasoned Firewood. Wood takes about 6 – 12 months to become dried, for home uses.
5. Lamp Oil, Wicks, Oil Lamps (First Choice: Buy CLEAR oil. If scarce, stockpile ANY!)
6. Coleman Fuel. Impossible to stockpile too much.
7. Guns, Ammunition, Pepper Spray, Knives, Clubs, Bats & Slingshots.
8. Can openers, & hand egg beaters, whisks, kitchen utensils.
9. Honey/Syrups/white, brown sugar
10. Rice – Beans – Wheat
11. Vegetable Oil (for cooking) Without it food burns/must be boiled etc.,)
12. Charcoal, Lighter Fluid (Will become scarce suddenly)
13. Water Containers (Urgent Item to obtain.) Any size. Small: HARD CLEAR PLASTIC ONLY – note – food grade if for drinking.
16. Propane Cylinders(Urgent: Definite shortages will occur.)
17. Survival Guide Book.
18. Mantles: Aladdin, Coleman, etc. (Without this item, longer-term lighting is difficult.)
19. Baby Supplies: Diapers/formula. ointments/aspirin, etc.
20. Washboards, Mop Bucket w/wringer (for Laundry)
21. Cook Stoves(Propane, Coleman & Kerosene)
22. Vitamins
23. Propane Cylinders and Handle-Holders (Urgent: Small canister use is dangerous without this item)
24. Feminine Hygiene/Haircare/Skin products.
25. Thermal underwear (Tops & Bottoms)
26. Bow saws, axes and hatchets, Wedges (also, honing oil)
27. Aluminum Foil Reg. & Heavy Duty (Great Cooking and Barter Item)
28. Gasoline Containers (Plastic & Metal)
29. Garbage Bags (Impossible To Have Too Many).
30. Toilet Paper, Kleenex, Paper Towels
31. Milk – Powdered & Condensed (Shake Liquid every 3 to 4 months)
32. Garden Seeds (Non-Hybrid) (A MUST)
33. Clothes pins/line/hangers (A MUST)
34. Coleman’s Pump Repair Kit
35. Tuna Fish (in oil)
36. Fire Extinguishers(or..large box of Baking Soda in every room)
37. First aid kits
38. Batteries (all sizes…buy furthest-out for Expiration Dates)
39. Garlic, spices & vinegar, baking supplies
40. Big Dogs (and plenty of dog food)
41. Flour, yeast & salt
42. Matches. {“Strike Anywhere” preferred.) Boxed, wooden matches will go first
43. Writing paper/pads/pencils, solar calculators
44. Insulated ice chests (good for keeping items from freezing in Wintertime.)
45. Heavy Duty Work Boots, belts, Levis & durable shirts
46. Flashlights/LIGHTSTICKS & torches, “No. 76 Dietz” Lanterns
47. Journals, Diaries & Scrapbooks (jot down ideas, feelings, experience; Historic Times)
48. Garbage cans Plastic (great for storage, water, transporting – if with wheels)
49. Men’s Hygiene: Shampoo, Toothbrush/paste, Mouthwash/floss, nail clippers, etc
50. Cast iron cookware (sturdy, efficient)
51. Fishing supplies/tools
52. Mosquito coils/repellent, sprays/creams
53. Duct Tape
54. Tarps/stakes/twine/nails/rope/spikes
55. Candles
56. Laundry Detergent (liquid)
57. Backpacks, Duffel Bags
58. Garden tools & supplies
59. Scissors, fabrics & sewing supplies
60. Canned Fruits, Veggies, Soups, stews, etc.
61. Bleach (plain, NOT scented: 4 to 6% sodium hypochlorite)
62. Canning supplies, (Jars/lids/wax)
63. Knives & Sharpening tools: files, stones, steel
64. Bicycles…Tires/tubes/pumps/chains, etc
65. Sleeping Bags& blankets/pillows/mats
66. Carbon Monoxide Alarm (battery powered)
67. Board Games, Cards, Dice
68. d-con Rat poison, MOUSE PRUFE II, Roach Killer
69. Mousetraps, Ant traps & cockroach magnets
70. Paper plates/cups/utensils (stock up, folks)
71. Baby wipes, oils, waterless & Antibacterial soap (saves a lot of water)
72. Rain gear, rubberized boots, etc.
73. Shaving supplies (razors & creams, talc, after shave)
74. Hand pumps & siphons (for water and for fuels)
75. Soysauce, vinegar, bullions/gravy/soupbase
76. Reading glasses
77. Chocolate/Cocoa/Tang/Punch (water enhancers)
78. “Survival-in-a-Can”
79. Woolen clothing: socks, scarves/ear-muffs/mittens
80. Boy Scout Handbook, / also Leaders Catalog
81. Roll-on Window Insulation Kit (MANCO)
82. Graham crackers, saltines, pretzels, Trail mix/Jerky
83. Popcorn, Peanut Butter, Nuts
84. Socks, Underwear, T-shirts, etc. (extras)
85. Lumber (all types)
86. Wagons & utility carts (for transport to and from)
87. Cots & Inflatable mattress’s
88. Gloves: Work/warming/gardening, etc.
89. Lantern Hangers
90. Screen Patches, glue, nails, screws, nuts & bolts
91. Teas
92. Coffee
93. Cigarettes
94. Wine/Liquors (for bribes, medicinal, etc,)
95. Paraffin Wax
96. Chickens
97. Chewing gum/candies
98. Atomizers (for cooling/bathing)
99. Hats & cotton neckerchiefs
100. Livestock

Been reading up on survial prep lately due to some debates with friends though i would share this list.

The items on the list seem to be the common consensus, thought the order seems to change from page to page

Haywire1
07-03-2012, 10:37 AM
Missed the biggest one j

COMMON SENSE.

Baker
07-03-2012, 11:02 AM
Missed the biggest one j

COMMON SENSE.

That's already gone for most people ;)

Haywire1
07-03-2012, 11:04 AM
treu, but what little is left is usually out the window in a SHTF situation.

RobSmith
07-03-2012, 12:40 PM
At least porn seems to be safe :)

Camo tung
07-03-2012, 08:23 PM
Civility.

Slice
07-29-2012, 02:11 AM
there is no such thing as common sense. if it existed, more people would have it.

woodenkayaker
07-29-2012, 08:42 AM
the survivalists starter kit :)
im not sure that my list would be the same... but certainly a few good ideas there....personally i think im gonna start hoarding the bird dogs..... ;)

Garetsu
07-30-2012, 09:20 AM
At least porn seems to be safe :)

Better stockpile. Just to be safe.

If nothing else, barter material!

zulu
07-31-2012, 03:56 PM
#11 - Vegetable Oil, not needed. tallow or lard is easy and comes from game or when cooking bacon. easy to refine and lasts long. it also can be used for more then cooking such as a metal oil, seasoning of cast iron, water proofing or even candle making.

OldWays
08-10-2012, 11:08 AM
I can say from personal experience that a large scale disaster causes many/most people (even very far away from the disaster site(s) ) who have never given a thought to being prepared before to suddenly to go batsh*t crazy nuts charging around trying to buy everything they can that they think they might need if the disaster gets to them. Bulk buying, hoarding and aggressive competition for resources become huge problems on many levels. It quickly becomes 'many/most people for themselves' and common sense and civility can be in very short supply, harder to find in fact than double A batteries and bottled water only a few hours after the disaster. This is not fantasy it is fact.

*not sure on the hoarding of porn but I imagine to some it might be an important 'survival' item!
:p

blacksmithden
08-11-2012, 07:15 AM
I can say from personal experience that a large scale disaster causes many/most people (even very far away from the disaster site(s) ) who have never given a thought to being prepared before to suddenly to go batsh*t crazy nuts charging around trying to buy everything they can that they think they might need if the disaster gets to them. Bulk buying, hoarding and aggressive competition for resources become huge problems on many levels. It quickly becomes 'many/most people for themselves' and common sense and civility can be in very short supply, harder to find in fact than double A batteries and bottled water only a few hours after the disaster. This is not fantasy it is fact.

*not sure on the hoarding of porn but I imagine to some it might be an important 'survival' item!
:p

When the hurricane hit us in Cuba, I didn't go shopping afterward, so I really can't say. There wasn't that much stuff on the shelves to begin with, so I imagine things only got worse....I don't know. I was much more interested in not missing my flight out of there.

When the big power blackout hit the east coast a decade or so ago, most stores where I was closed up right away. Without tills/bar code scanners running, they had no way of knowing the prices of products, much less charging people for them. I wonder how many people can even remember what it was like when every single product actually had a price tag put on it by the store.

The one convience store near me that was open 24/7 didn't close. He just parked his own car out front with the headlights pointing inside and carried on. There were a few more people in there than normal, but nobody was cleaning him out either. You had to pay in cash of course. Actually, people were more pollite than usual if anything. I don't know if he was open the following days or not. I guess the major thing there was that everyone expected the power to be back on within a few days, so there was no real sense of urgency....just an unscheduled day or two off work. It would have been 'interesting' (for lack of a better word) to see what would have happened if it had turned into a week (or more) long event.

My big concern would be how many people are going to see the smoke coming out of my chimney if we ever have a large scale power blackout in Edmonton when it's -40C or even lower outside. It doesn't take long for a house to get down near the freezing mark when it's that cold. I already have a few people who know to come to my place if such an event occurred. Turning people away at the door would suck, but might have to be done.

sjemac
08-11-2012, 09:37 AM
They never think of salt. Salt will be important in a long term SHTF situation.
Canning, salting meat, pickling etc. Because it has become so common in today's society, we forget how difficult it was to historically produce and obtain.

OldWays
08-11-2012, 07:20 PM
Very good point sjemac.

scraw
08-30-2012, 03:33 AM
I don't drink aside from special occasions, but I've started to stockpile Alcohol. It would be a very valuable bargaining item to have. If the world goes to crap, I'm certain that some people will be looking for a drink.

sDot
08-30-2012, 07:16 AM
Probably a good idea to move to a really small town in the middle of nowhere filled with people you don't like, but own a lot of stuff..

jwirecom109
08-30-2012, 08:20 AM
http://a2.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/3266_4428340228559_1588199367_n.jpg

salt is in only some locations in canada, so if your close to a mine you might be ok, IF not its a good idea to stockup

JustBen
08-30-2012, 08:39 AM
Keep in mind the difference between iodized and non-iodized salts. You'll want the former for table salt and the latter for curing or pickling. Its cheap enough to buy a few sacks to keep on hand. I also like to keep a bit of morton's tenderquick in my pantry for curing.

OldWays
08-31-2012, 10:01 AM
JustBen $ sjemac you brought up a good point about salt curing and picking, we got into putting up our own food this year. It was a great learning experience and we realized how much knowledge we have lost in just one generation or two in this area. The amount of good food we saved from our garden and apple trees was huge. Our pantry is really filling up with preserved/canned food we did ourselves and relevant to your comments we realized that we would need to 'lay by' things like salt, vinegar, sugar etc. in case someday things changed and we couldn't just go to the store and get more. Without them we loose the ability to preserve future food surplus, ie at harvest or after a hunt. I know lots of people who say they would just 'hunt' for food if SHTF etc. but don't have the knowledge or equipment/supplies to put it up. You would have to have a very large very hungry family to eat a whole deer before it spoiled without preserving it someway (unless it was winter.) From what we learned this summer preserving supplies (and knowledge) have a firm place in our stock pile.

Haywire1
10-17-2012, 05:57 PM
From a Sarajevo War Survivor:
Experiencing horrible things that can happen in a war - death of parents and
friends, hunger and malnutrition, endless freezing cold, fear, sniper attacks.

1. Stockpiling helps. but you never no how long trouble will last, so locate
near renewable food sources.
2. Living near a well with a manual pump is like being in Eden.
3. After awhile, even gold can lose its luster. But there is no luxury in war
quite like toilet paper. Its surplus value is greater than gold's.
4. If you had to go without one utility, lose electricity - it's the easiest to
do without (unless you're in a very nice climate with no need for heat.)
5. Canned foods are awesome, especially if their contents are tasty without
heating. One of the best things to stockpile is canned gravy - it makes a lot of
the dry unappetizing things you find to eat in war somewhat edible. Only needs
enough heat to "warm", not to cook. It's cheap too, especially if you buy it in
bulk.
6. Bring some books - escapist ones like romance or mysteries become more
valuable as the war continues. Sure, it's great to have a lot of survival
guides, but you'll figure most of that out on your own anyway - trust me, you'll
have a lot of time on your hands.
7. The feeling that you're human can fade pretty fast. I can't tell you how many
people I knew who would have traded a much needed meal for just a little bit of
toothpaste, rouge, soap or cologne. Not much point in fighting if you have to
lose your humanity. These things are morale-builders like nothing else.
8. Slow burning candles and matches, matches, matches

not mine, just thoughts from someone who has been there done that, in conditions more severe then i hope most of us ever have to deal with.

RobSmith
10-17-2012, 07:09 PM
Sounds a lot like the ice storm of 98. It was much the same in my home town, until the 2nd day that is. By then the local convience store owner was reduced to selling things like batteries and even birthday candles by the unit rather than in packs, and even then he was cleaned out by the 3rd or 4th day.


When the hurricane hit us in Cuba, I didn't go shopping afterward, so I really can't say. There wasn't that much stuff on the shelves to begin with, so I imagine things only got worse....I don't know. I was much more interested in not missing my flight out of there.

When the big power blackout hit the east coast a decade or so ago, most stores where I was closed up right away. Without tills/bar code scanners running, they had no way of knowing the prices of products, much less charging people for them. I wonder how many people can even remember what it was like when every single product actually had a price tag put on it by the store.

The one convience store near me that was open 24/7 didn't close. He just parked his own car out front with the headlights pointing inside and carried on. There were a few more people in there than normal, but nobody was cleaning him out either. You had to pay in cash of course. Actually, people were more pollite than usual if anything. I don't know if he was open the following days or not. I guess the major thing there was that everyone expected the power to be back on within a few days, so there was no real sense of urgency....just an unscheduled day or two off work. It would have been 'interesting' (for lack of a better word) to see what would have happened if it had turned into a week (or more) long event.

My big concern would be how many people are going to see the smoke coming out of my chimney if we ever have a large scale power blackout in Edmonton when it's -40C or even lower outside. It doesn't take long for a house to get down near the freezing mark when it's that cold. I already have a few people who know to come to my place if such an event occurred. Turning people away at the door would suck, but might have to be done.

&14ALL
11-01-2012, 07:10 PM
Naked lady playing cards. You can play cards, start a fire, look at the pictures for recreational purposes, and trade them in bits and pieces for other things. Better than a wallet full of plastic and cash, and as easy to carry.