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road kill
01-20-2016, 06:43 PM
Well I didn't plan on butchering but yesterday two bulls got to fighting and the red angus i bought last spring for $6000 broke a leg.:frown1: Will have to get out the burger press and sausage machine. I'll eat well again and my doctor will be pissed, wants me to eat chicken and fish.

R&R Rancher
01-20-2016, 06:48 PM
I feel your pain :( If you have livestock sooner or later you'll have deadstock.


Will he be any good to eat? I've heard people say that meat from a virgin bull tastes far better than meat from one who's been used for breeding.

Kenwp
01-20-2016, 07:21 PM
Depends also on how stressed the bull was before he died. If he's only a 3 year old and unstressed the meat would be not bad. But stressed you might need a chainsaw to cut him.

kennymo
01-20-2016, 07:23 PM
I feel your pain :( If you have livestock sooner or later you'll have deadstock.


Will he be any good to eat? I've heard people say that meat from a virgin bull tastes far better than meat from one who's been used for breeding.

From what I recall the grinder is the best thing for a bull.... I can recall castrating a young one who wrecked his pecker, and grain feeding for a while....he wasn't so bad. But not an option if they're suffering....
Though I guess broken pecker and castrating could be argued as such....

R&R Rancher
01-20-2016, 07:28 PM
Though I guess broken pecker and castrating could be argued as such....

That would rate in my books!

Candychikita
01-20-2016, 09:01 PM
Forgive my ignorance, is there no way to just set his leg? $6000 is a lot for some hamburger.

kennymo
01-20-2016, 09:19 PM
Forgive my ignorance, is there no way to just set his leg? $6000 is a lot for some hamburger.

I asked that question when I was younger. From what I understand it's not terribly effective on an animal well over 2000 lbs.... And if he comes out of it with a limp or twisted leg or anything like that his market value will be less than the vet bill.

R&R Rancher
01-20-2016, 09:32 PM
In the past I've successfully fixed broken legs on newborn calves. It has to be low down, though. Set the bone, and wrap it in an old shirt and make a "cast" out of duct tape and strips from a 20 liter pail. Every few days you would cut and retape so it as the calf grew the cast grew with it. A few weeks and it was good to go.

An adult bull weighing over a ton is a different matter. If it is too high, say above the stifle joint, there is nothing to be done. Cattle don't worry about clean, so there would have been lots of stuff get in under a cast and eventually cause infection. Flies laying eggs in damaged tissue are another concern if the cast rubs a raw spot. I've seen some livestock with broken legs left to heal on their own, but its painful for the animal and almost never heals right.

This may sound harsh, but that bull's sole purpose on Road Kill's place was to breed cows. With a broken leg he will never be able to do that properly, and so becomes an economic loss. Turning him into burger is one of the few ways to recoup that loss. And any good stockman cares for the welfare of his livestock. That bull would have been in pain and so the kindest thing is to put him down. It's never a good feeling on any level, BTDT.

R&R Rancher
01-20-2016, 09:36 PM
Road Kill, was this a heifer bull or did you use him on cows? Are you going to replace him with another RA? Small comfort, but at least this isn't breeding season and you have time to find a decent replacement

Camo tung
01-20-2016, 10:04 PM
Road Kill, was this a heifer bull or did you use him on cows? Are you going to replace him with another RA? Small comfort, but at least this isn't breeding season and you have time to find a decent replacement

They are looking for homes to accommodate incoming refugees...maybe get yourself a couple of "Sire-ians"? Win win!

road kill
01-21-2016, 06:19 AM
The bull was used on heifers last year, he was a long yearling. City guys need not ask what a long yearling is, cow guys know.;D Ya we are going to a sale jan 30 to look at another RA, makes a good cross on our Charolais heifers. The bull in question was going to market anyway due to a bad attitude, came for both me and my daughter and I wont put up with a critter that runs me out of the corral. I can't run very good anymore.:run: At least the Charolais bull didn't get hurt or i'd be buying two bulls. I think he will be ok for regular cuts of meat, may have to cook low and slow though. If it's to tough well then into the grinder. So Camo tung what would I do with some "Sire-ians" use them for breeding or butchering. I'm afraid the calves would look funny and as a roast well--- :eek1:

R&R Rancher
01-21-2016, 05:48 PM
If he had an attitude like that it's a good thing you used him on heifers and won't likely keep any replacements. Calving season can be interesting enough without a bunch of the mamas getting extra ornery. I always had a soft spot for the Chars as you can tell from my avatar, but those RA's make great heifer bulls. Easy calving and those little guys won't rest until they've had that first meal!

pitw
01-21-2016, 07:11 PM
I've ate quite a few leg broke critters over the years. They are definitely best if shot right after the break happens. Hamburger is good and like it has been said you can try a steak and decide whether to eat them or hamburg it all.

infidel29
01-27-2016, 10:12 AM
They are looking for homes to accommodate incoming refugees...maybe get yourself a couple of "Sire-ians"? Win win!

I hear they make piss-poor breeding stock ;)

Foxer
01-27-2016, 11:07 AM
Well I didn't plan on butchering but yesterday two bulls got to fighting and the red angus i bought last spring for $6000 broke a leg.:frown1: Will have to get out the burger press and sausage machine. I'll eat well again and my doctor will be pissed, wants me to eat chicken and fish.

Can you perhaps arrange a rooster-tuna match up for next time?

road kill
01-28-2016, 04:52 AM
I don't think a rooster tuna fight would be as destructive as a couple of 2000lb bulls getting it on. The rooster wouldn't last long under water either. Doesn't taste as good as a beef anyways.

R&R Rancher
01-28-2016, 06:56 AM
Seeing a pair of bulls REALLY fighting is a sight to see. There's a lot of raw power there.

This might be safer and taste decent.

http://www.mattmcloone.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/MSM.091224_014.jpg

Kenwp
01-30-2016, 06:04 AM
You want to see a fight is two big boars going at it. You end up welding for a week sometimes repairing everything. The last time the biggest one died on me the next day in the worst place possible.

pitw
01-30-2016, 08:30 AM
You want to see a fight is two big boars going at it. You end up welding for a week sometimes repairing everything. The last time the biggest one died on me the next day in the worst place possible.

Best coyote bait I ever got was from them fighting.

R&R Rancher
01-30-2016, 10:33 AM
For reference, here's a pair of bulls fighting I found on YouTube. I would say they are more sparing than fighting.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=icJ4VFpMlq4

PITW, back at home you'd need to get there quick. Last cow my cousin lost out on the prairie last fall was nothing but bones a day later.

Candychikita
01-30-2016, 07:08 PM
Man. I can see what you mean about power. Those bulls look like they are just goofing around but if they decided to go at it, man. They really tear up the ground too.

How is that meat not tasty eating? That looks like there would be a lot of meat on one of those bulls. Yucky hormones or something?

road kill
01-30-2016, 07:21 PM
Ya those two weren't real serious. Mine dressed out at 1000lbs and will be okay to eat, they only fought for a short time when the leg gave out. I have people lining up to buy burger.

kennymo
01-30-2016, 10:58 PM
Man. I can see what you mean about power. Those bulls look like they are just goofing around but if they decided to go at it, man. They really tear up the ground too.

How is that meat not tasty eating? That looks like there would be a lot of meat on one of those bulls. Yucky hormones or something?

There's a reason we eat steers and not bulls. Similar to most species, the males can taste a little off and be a little tougher to chew than the females. Not always true....best tasting deer I ever shot was a buck....but so was the worst tasting. The good one was living it up on winter wheat, the steaks melted in your mouth like butter....

soulchaser
02-02-2016, 04:37 PM
They are looking for homes to accommodate incoming refugees...maybe get yourself a couple of "Sire-ians"? Win win!

Nah, I hear they like goats.

tigrr
02-02-2016, 10:23 PM
This is a spoiler and if you don't like spoilers stop reading now..........
Know what most ground pork is made from. Old sows and boars.. They add enough spices to mask all distaste full aroma's in sausages.

I wish I lived closer to you road kill. I'd line up to buy some burger.
Last burger was from a barren 4 year old heifer in 2008. $2 a pound if you buy 100 lbs. Down to 6 lbs. sigh!

Dmay
02-03-2016, 01:14 PM
Brings to mind two bulls we had go at it one spring. Both about a ton, and they took out two big gates, built of rough-lumber 2x6, and some 2x10- and rail-corral fence. Didn't hurt the bulls a dam bit, but we had a vet there preg-checking and he fired up his fancy car right quick and moved it a good ways away.....

gtr
02-13-2016, 09:44 AM
This is a spoiler and if you don't like spoilers stop reading now..........
Know what most ground pork is made from. Old sows and boars.. They add enough spices to mask all distaste full aroma's in sausages.

I wish I lived closer to you road kill. I'd line up to buy some burger.
Last burger was from a barren 4 year old heifer in 2008. $2 a pound if you buy 100 lbs. Down to 6 lbs. sigh!

I have gravel in the driveway that's not as old as that burger.