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Northshore
02-20-2016, 10:52 PM
My brand new Leupold Scope just got delivered Yesterday and I want to mount it on my Winchester Model 94 Angle Eject Lever Action Rifle. The scope has an one inch tube and the mounts are Weaver mounts.

The mounting instructions that came with the scope recommend that the scope be mounted as low as possible, but to watch out for the height of exposed hammers on lever actions interfering or making contact with the scope. I am also concerned about the ejected cartridges hitting the scope because they eject at an angle, not straight out the side.

I have been told that scope rings come in three different height sizes, low, medium and high. Does anyone know for sure what height size will work on my rifle? If you could help me out by telling me a brand name and or model number of a set of rings that will work would be great as well.

I drove all the way to Thunder Bay today just to see a blank expression on the clerks face when I asked him what rings I would need for my rifle. I really had other stuff to do in Thunder Bay as well but I told the clerk I drove all the way just to buy scope rings, maybe he will try and improve his job performance in the future.

blacksmithden
02-21-2016, 03:11 AM
I had a scope on my 94 AE years ago, but I honestly can't remember the height of the rings. I do remember picking it up from the gunsmith that drilled and tapped it for me, and having great concern about it. We ejected a few cases while I was there, and there was no problem. My best advice to you....take the gun, and a couple of empty brass cases with you right to the store. The diameter of the back of the scope is going to be the decided factor. I don't think you'll get away with low mounts, so try a medium set first. Loose mount it right at the counter if they'll let you. Make sure your hammer clears, and then try ejecting a case a few times to make sure they clear. The other thing you're going to want to pick up while you're there is a hammer spur. It's a small piece that screws into the side of the hammer so you can cock it and lower it without pinching your finger between the hammer and the bottom of the scope.

Kenwp
02-21-2016, 08:50 AM
I have a set of all three heights sitting here and the the low is 2mm thick on the part that sits on the mount. The medium is 8.33 mm thick and the high is 14 mm thick. I hate high mounts due to poor cheek weld myself. What is the size of the scope front lens .

Northshore
02-21-2016, 10:39 AM
The scope model is Leupold FX-II 4x33mm, the front or objective lens is 33mm wide, however that is just a measurement of the glass lens its'self ( maybe that is all that is needed, I have never mounted a scope before.) the measurement of the front lens of the scope including the lens and the scope body that surrounds the lens is just under 4 centimetres.

Foxer
02-21-2016, 01:18 PM
You can get a hammer extension (basically makes the hammer accessible from the side) to address any problems with the scope interfering with the hammer. It just slips over the hammer and makes it easy to cock from the side instead of underneath the scope.

BrotherRockeye
02-21-2016, 01:27 PM
You can get a hammer extension (basically makes the hammer accessible from the side) to address any problems with the scope interfering with the hammer. It just slips over the hammer and makes it easy to cock from the side instead of underneath the scope.

That only helps your thumb clearance. The hammer spur still has to miss the ocular bell of the scope.

Measure your eye relief with the scope you have then hold the rifle where you will shoot it. Measure where the scope would be in relation to the hammer travel. You may get lucky and the scope is forward enough that clearance isn't an issue.

Long eye relief is the answer to low mounting with a hammer rifle. But since you already have the scope... You will likely end up using medium rings, that will have your 33mm scope above your barrel quite a bit. No worries about removing your rear sight for clearance though. You may have to add a cheek riser to get a comfortable cheek weld.

iirc the 94 was originally a top eject. The AE was implemented FOR scope use, so that shouldn't be an issue...shouldn't...

I have some see thru rings if you want to try that route...

blacksmithden
02-21-2016, 01:29 PM
You can get a hammer extension (basically makes the hammer accessible from the side) to address any problems with the scope interfering with the hammer. It just slips over the hammer and makes it easy to cock from the side instead of underneath the scope.

They make a spur that screws right into the side of the hammer on a model 94. The threaded hole should already be there.

http://media.midwayusa.com/productimages/880x660/Primary/732/732435.jpg

Foxer
02-21-2016, 01:50 PM
That only helps your thumb clearance. The hammer spur still has to miss the ocular bell of the scope. Well yes :) but it still allows you to mount it lower and still have the gun usable.

Northshore
02-21-2016, 01:51 PM
The rifle came with a spur screw for the hammer. The scope has generous eye relief at 4 inches. I should not have to remove the front buckhorn iron sight because it folds down. My concern is with the exposed hammer making contact with the ocular bell of the scope and to have enough clearance for the angle ejected cartridges to miss the scope body.

BrotherRockeye
02-21-2016, 03:55 PM
This is the point where I usually go to my box of rings and see what works...

Buy a set each of cheap arsed aluminum low and medium rings to try, and keep for future use.

When you have the fit you need buy some good quality rings of the right height.

Northshore
02-21-2016, 04:04 PM
Thanks for all the advice everyone, I think I will just go and order a pair of medium height rings and see if they will fit correct and go from there.

BrotherRockeye
02-21-2016, 09:31 PM
Thanks for all the advice everyone, I think I will just go and order a pair of medium height rings and see if they will fit correct and go from there.


and if they don't...

Spend the $20 and buy a cheap set of lows and mids.

Unless this is the last iron you'll ever own, you will appreciate having them in the tool box.