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View Full Version : Aspiring Winnipeg machinists and train lovers



kennymo
04-15-2016, 09:35 AM
I just stumbled onto a new hobby place opening up in the city called Trains N' Treasures in the old Safeway building off Ness and Sturgeon. There's a ride in train for the kids, train hobby and antique store, and more importantly, they're opening a machine and woodworking shop in the back that you can use for a monthly membership fee. Also, they're offering some machinist training courses on a hobby level. $40 a month to join.

I spoke with the entrepreneur, a machinist by trade, he's retired and is trying to make a go of all his hobbies for a living. Seems like it'll be something to keep an eye on, it's pretty 'in the works' right now, lots of plywood decor.... But if it takes off he's putting in a 50's cafe and a place for the kids to play while you do hobby stuff. We'll see how it does I suppose, but it's right in my neighbourhood. Told him I'd definitely be interested in some basic machinist training when they open that up....

FALover
04-15-2016, 09:50 AM
It has possibilities. Maybe instead of keeping kids preoccupied there could be lessons for them as well. The world needs more tradespersons and any chance of finding a gifted kid with a knack for hands on work should be looked at closely.

Rory McCanuck
04-15-2016, 10:03 AM
Was quite sad to see that Safeway go, as I could run across the back lane from the Ma-in-Law's house to grab mushrooms to go with supper.
Now it's drive all the way to Cavalier and Portage, and without the bridge... :mad:

I saw the name painted on the glass and didn't really think too much about it.
I think I'll have to make a point to stop in!

kennymo
04-15-2016, 10:10 AM
Was quite sad to see that Safeway go, as I could run across the back lane from the Ma-in-Law's house to grab mushrooms to go with supper.
Now it's drive all the way to Cavalier and Portage, and without the bridge... :mad:

I saw the name painted on the glass and didn't really think too much about it.
I think I'll have to make a point to stop in!

Yeah, there's not a helluva lot in there right now, but apparently he's expecting some more stuff to arrive in the not too distant future. It'll be interesting if he gets it off the ground...

Oh, the Safeway at Ness and Route 90 might be a hair closer with that bridge out until 2017. Right where the old Hooters used to be. :)

blacksmithden
04-15-2016, 02:33 PM
More power.to him. I wonder how much insurance he has to pay in order for them to cover him letting any square peg operate a lathe or mill.

Mark-II
04-15-2016, 03:12 PM
Any live steam stuff?

kennymo
04-16-2016, 11:50 AM
More power.to him. I wonder how much insurance he has to pay in order for them to cover him letting any square peg operate a lathe or mill.

He said there'd be some basic training involved before anyone touched a thing. Though he seemed more concerned about the cost of the equipment than anyone losing a finger, lol.


Any live steam stuff?

Didn't note anything, but it's pretty bare bones in there right now. Just a handful of larger size engines and cars on the shelves, kinda around the size of the old Lionel sets (G scale?). I'm going to pop back in around the end of the month. He said they'd be expecting a bit more stock around then. I'm keeping an eye out for the old man since he's a rabid HO scale modeller....:).

blacksmithden
04-16-2016, 12:12 PM
He said there'd be some basic training involved before anyone touched a thing. Though he seemed more concerned about the cost of the equipment than anyone losing a finger, lol.


Well...that has to be a concern. Lathes have power feeds that will let you drive your tooling right into the chuck and there really isn't anything you can do about it except be a competent operator. Leaving the power feed on and letting a cross slide or the carriage reach the end of it's travel breaks very expensive, and hard to find parts. At the same time....A 1.5 to 2.0 hp motor (standard for a 36" tool room lathe) running at 1850 rpm, driving a chuck that's geared down, even at it's fastest speed, will suck you in without even thinking about it. Lathes have zero sympathy. They are neither smart or dumb. They don't care if your arm, and the rest of you are being turned into hamburger or there are pieces of you being ripped off. Letting Joe general public use yours without shoulder hanging supervision is like a ticking time bomb. LOL. Hopefully he's got a fire hose set up to wash off the equipment...... and the walls....and the windows...and the ceiling....and the...... :) Vertical knee mills...same thing. There's a reason I call fly cutters "the spinning blade of death." Even on my mill....which is big by hobby standards at 2.0 hp, but still isn't commercial size....one loose article of clothing or loose hair, and it's all over. You might as well jump in a damned wood chipper. At least that would kill you fairly quickly.

Rory McCanuck
04-16-2016, 12:31 PM
I remember the lathes in school all had great big chips out of the raceways, from boneheads leaving the key in the chuck and starting it up.
It would probably be safer and less painful all round to just give everyone chainsaws ;D

FlyingHigh
04-17-2016, 10:50 AM
In my high school woodworking shop, only a few of us who showed more advanced tool skills, competence and common sense were allowed to use the wood lathes. I seem to remember the teacher saying that on average only about 3 or 4 people out of a typical class size of 20 would be allowed to use them. I know in my group only myself and 2 others were allowed to. Everyone else wasn't even allowed within 5ft of them. LOL

Interestingly enough, from what I've heard those 3 or 4 of us ended up working in the trades after graduation. Everyone else went and pushed paper at university and is either still in school or is in a white collar job now. Perhaps it's a good way to determine future career paths eh?

Mark-II
04-17-2016, 08:16 PM
They have and use some pretty serious lathes in one of our high schools. Not like my little unimat or princess auto Chinese jobby.

I have a few reject hammers that were a student project. Nylon tipped, aluminum head and handle, brass skull crusher (or decorative knob) on the end. Each major operation represented and 3 materials in one final project.

Neat stuff. I keep one in my range case.