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Likeaboss
08-09-2016, 06:06 PM
I broke down and ordered a Mossberg 535 three barrel mossy oak combo, as my WTB 12 ga thread just wasn't generating any interest. Great deal and service from Al Flaherty's as usual.

So now I'm admiring and playing with my freshly delivered gun (thanks Canada Post), and am thinking that I'll want to pick up a scope for deer season while I'm taking a break from duck hunting.

School me please - what should I aim to buy, spec and make/model wise? What do you like? What would you buy? Keep in mind that it's for a 12 ga shotgun to shoot slugs into deer at maybe 50 yards. It's also not being mounted on a $2000 Benelli - think entry level scope for entry level gun, both of which I expect to do what I'm asking them to do, and last 20 years if I treat 'em well. Say somewhere in the 1x-10x range, sharp resolution, and durable, not readily knocked off zero.

I'll probably wander around bass pro and canadian tire to see what they have to start with. I like to try before I buy and Cabelas is a bit of a trek.

JustBen
08-09-2016, 06:32 PM
I'd look at a nice 2-7x scope.

Nikon and bushnell both offer decent scopes in the price range you probably want to stay it.

Swampdonkey
08-09-2016, 09:51 PM
I vote red dot or T-dot reflexive sight.

kennymo
08-09-2016, 10:21 PM
2-7x or a 1-4x. Fast target acquisition with a little zoom in case you need it. There's a bit of recoil to a 12 gauge slug, I wouldn't go with the cheapest scope out there... Bushnell isn't a terrible choice if you avoid their bottom end scopes, I quite like their Elites which aren't terribly expensive (at least in the hunting models). Nikon, always a good suggestion. I just got a Vortex that I think I'm going to like, warranty is killer and I know they have some low powered scopes intended for slug and muzzleloader.... Lots of options ;).

Rory McCanuck
08-09-2016, 10:48 PM
We just put a Bushnell red dot on my buddy's Mossberg 500 slug gun with the rifled barrel.
That thing comes up and points beautifully; the red dot just suddenly appears dead centre of what you were looking at.
No magnification, but there isn't much call for it for this particular gun's role in life.

Likeaboss
08-13-2016, 09:46 AM
Now I'm torn...

The red dot sights seem like a good idea, but the customer reviews on them are all over the place.

I think i can get into a low mag factor standard bushnell or nikon for a couple of hundred bucks, tho then add another 50 for decent rings (which the red dots seem to include more often).

I'm leaning toward old school with this one unless there's a slam dunk, tried and tested red dot that's going to save me a lot of dough.

Foxer
08-13-2016, 10:46 AM
Now I'm torn...

The red dot sights seem like a good idea, but the customer reviews on them are all over the place.

I think i can get into a low mag factor standard bushnell or nikon for a couple of hundred bucks, tho then add another 50 for decent rings (which the red dots seem to include more often).

I'm leaning toward old school with this one unless there's a slam dunk, tried and tested red dot that's going to save me a lot of dough.

Well the red dot won't save you money over a 'budget' class scope - it's more a matter of preference. Red dots' are fine - but not everyone likes them and not everyone's eyes seem to work well with them. I like 'em fine, I have a buddy who just can't make them work.

A red dot is faster. easier to use with both eyes open, which is how they should be used. In tight brush or where you're trying to jump an animal out of bed, they have a lot of advantages.

A scope is a little more precise (probably not that big a deal with a shotgun slug), you get the magnification which is very nice, and virtually everyone can use a scope. It's the nicer choic when your sitting and expect to have a few seconds to watch your target before you fire or you're slowly tracking the animal waiting for it to give you that shot. Check your eye relief tho.

Kinda depends on what kind of hunting you see yourself doing, and what your personal preference is.

Likeaboss
08-16-2016, 08:00 AM
While taking another look at the scopes it seemed that I would be in the $200 to $300 range for a mid-range priced unit (ie not entry level, respected name).

As compared to that, this little fella seems like a savings.

http://www.alflahertys.com/collections/optics/products/bushnell-trophy-red-dot-trs-25-1x25mm-realtree-ap-w-3-moa-reticle-731309

Assuming I'm going to give red dots a try for close brush sitting/stalking style deer hunting with the 535, does this seem like a decent unit to get my feet wet with? Reviews elsewhere on it are almost universally positive.

Swampdonkey
08-16-2016, 09:11 AM
Where are you? Someone could lend you a reflexive/holographic sight, surely.

Likeaboss
08-16-2016, 10:45 AM
Where are you? Someone could lend you a reflexive/holographic sight, surely.
I roam between Niagara and Etobicoke, though I'd be leery of borrowing an optic for fear I'd damage it and have to buy two in the end. ;)

Swampdonkey
08-16-2016, 02:28 PM
Red dots are hard to damage, unlike a conventional scope.

Likeaboss
08-27-2016, 12:38 PM
I picked up the Bush trophy red dot that I'd mentioned. Dead simple to mount on the cantilevered 535 barrel rail, and very easy to use and sight in with a few 2 3/4" sabots at the range.

The only thing that I dislike so far is that there isn't enough clearance between the sight and the rail to tuck the butterfly lens caps down out of the way, I have to pull them right off the top and put them in my pocket or gun case.

I can't wait to try it out in the field.