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chalkriver
09-28-2012, 09:57 PM
I have most of the gear I need to start reloading but I need to pick up a case trimmer....I was thinking of the Lyman Carbide version .
There is an power adapter available to hook up a drill made for this as well.

http://i1177.photobucket.com/albums/x357/chalkriver/CarbideTrimmer.jpg

I see Brownells is out of stock...anyone else carry this model ?

What other trimmers do people recommend ?

Rory McCanuck
09-28-2012, 11:11 PM
NoSales says they carry them,
http://ca.wholesalesports.com/storefront/reloading/case-trimming/universal-case-trimmer/prod75150.html

chalkriver
09-29-2012, 04:36 AM
Thanks for the info (with shipping they are $149.78 )....I found them on ebay from optics planet for about $25 cheaper shipping included .

JustBen
09-29-2012, 06:10 AM
I have the similar hornady one. Do yourself a favor and get the drill attachment now. After about 100 brass your hands will hurt if you don't.

chalkriver
09-29-2012, 06:49 AM
I took a reloading course a couple years ago and they highly recommended the Wilson brand.
Saw this one at Brownells and just ordered it .
As always I spent more than I wanted to but I wanted a good one that will last me forever.
I ordered 3 shell holders for it and a bullet puller as well.
All I need now is the powder ;)

http://i1177.photobucket.com/albums/x357/chalkriver/p_749013157_4.jpg

M.T. Chambers
09-29-2012, 11:31 AM
I use the equip. from Forster, where you use your drill press to trim cases, very fast and no sore hands.

awndray
03-11-2015, 11:02 AM
So, I'm looking at case trimmers. I've Googled them all - Lee, Lyman, RCBS, Forster, Wilson, etc. I'll be loading low-volume and I don't particularly want a powered trimmer. I want something that'll last my lifetime, but I don't want to break the bank just to get what others consider to be the best. My concern is when comparing the lathe styles. From experience, are the Lyman, RCBS and Forster as wobbly as some people are saying in their reviews? The Wilson looks to be pretty solid because of the case holder, but it's not cheap once you add the trimmer, the holder(s) and base. They've been around for ages, so I imagine they're good enough for a lot of people out there.

Dmay
03-11-2015, 01:01 PM
I am happy with the Redding I have. Other brands may too, but this one has a micrometer adjustment so is easy to record settings and set up quickly when changing between different cartridges.

awndray
03-11-2015, 01:03 PM
Ah yes, I forgot about Redding. I remember seeing that it has the micrometer and I really like that. Good call.

Lee Enfield
03-11-2015, 07:05 PM
Heck, take out a 2nd mortgage and buy a Giraud, expensive but probably the Rolls Royce of trimmers. With the dollar in the sewer and a extra cutter for .308 (also .223) freight and GST/PST it will run you around $750.00 Canadian. Does all the work, trims, de burrs and chamfers all in one operation. You can do hundreds of cases in a hour and will last a lifetime.

http://www.giraudtool.com/prod02.htm

Oh, and probably the nicest people you could deal with!

Rory McCanuck
03-11-2015, 09:30 PM
So, I'm looking at case trimmers. I've Googled them all - Lee, Lyman, RCBS, Forster, Wilson, etc. I'll be loading low-volume and I don't particularly want a powered trimmer. I want something that'll last my lifetime, but I don't want to break the bank just to get what others consider to be the best. My concern is when comparing the lathe styles. From experience, are the Lyman, RCBS and Forster as wobbly as some people are saying in their reviews? The Wilson looks to be pretty solid because of the case holder, but it's not cheap once you add the trimmer, the holder(s) and base. They've been around for ages, so I imagine they're good enough for a lot of people out there.

Here is another source: http://www.ch4d.com/products/equipment/case-trimmers/301000 I think they're a bit cheaper than elsewhere.
The same system as the Wilson, and I understand the shell holders are interchangeable; everything I've read or heard has been very positive. This is a mom and pop operation, so if you call in the evening (as they're on the floor all day) you get to talk to the mom or the pop.

I'm waffling between the CH4D/Wilson type and the Redding.
They both have an advantage over the rest of the lathe types. On a lathe type with a spinning cutter, any play in the cutter's shaft will cut the mouth not square. With the Redding, the cutter is stationary and the case moves, so the mouth has to cut square.

Of course, the lowly Lee trimmer pins cut dead square and are dead nuts accurate, too ;)

blacksmithden
03-12-2015, 07:02 AM
I've got a couple different types. I always go back to the Lee ones. Put the shell holder assembly in a cordless drill and have at it. I keep meaning to make up a jig so I can do it in my mill, but haven't gotten around to it yet. Another thing on a long list of projects......

awndray
03-12-2015, 07:28 AM
I'm not particularly interested in a power trimmer. The main reason is, I don't like clutter and I don't feel like having to deal with a drill. Secondly, I don't like relying on electricity for everything. The Wilson is starting to look good to me, but I don't know if I feel like spending those dollars on the different holders. A universal one would be nice if I happen to want or need to reload a caliber that I don't usually keep on hand.

Rory McCanuck
03-12-2015, 10:18 AM
No one says that you have to be limited to one trimmer, either.
I use Lee gauge pins and shellholders for most things, and I have a Pacific lathe type for any oddballs.
The Pacific isn't "universal", it uses regular shellholders. I think Hornady still makes a version of it.

If you aren't a fan of using a drill, consider a Lee Zip Trim. Just a little pull starter that spins the case.
Mine mounts with two screws and lives in a drawer when it isn't needed.
4-6 pulls and a case is processed.
Usually 2 to trim, one each to deburr inside and out, and a pull or two with a green scrubby pad to clean the case for those that haven't been cleaned already.
I wouldn't want to sit down and process 1000 .223 brass that way, but for up to 50 at a time it works very nicely.


ETA: Don't forget, the shellholders for Wilson/CH4D trimmer work for a bunch of different calibres. Four or 5 holders would likely do 90% of your reloading needs.
'06, '08, 30-30, .532" belted mag and a Whizzum would trim a lot of cases.

awndray
01-29-2016, 08:09 PM
I opted for the Lyman to save a few bucks. I'm not impressed. It'll do for now, but I think I'll be ordering a Wilson.

http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160130/95f4e0334597859dae352ce6de01c21a.jpg

The power adapter would be nice though.

762shooter
01-30-2016, 06:55 PM
I have a Forster. It is well made and the cutters stay sharp for a long, long time but it is slow and laborious to use. I actually do most of my trimming with Lee case trimmers spun in my benchtop drill press. It is fast, easy and foolproof. I already had the drill press so buying and finding a place for that was not an issue.

road kill
01-30-2016, 07:05 PM
I've had a Forster for a loooooooooong time and like it, recently bought a Frankford Arsenal power trimmer for large batches. Won't be getting rid of the old forster it's fine for 20 at a time but the hands don't like it for any larger batches. The FA unite works good, i'm happy with it.

looch
01-31-2016, 07:43 AM
I use one of these Forsters in my drill press:

http://www.scratchypants.com/pics/forcase.jpg

You need a good, positive stop on your drill press, though. I really like having a drill press in my reloading room, too.

lone-wolf
01-31-2016, 10:34 AM
I use one of these Forsters in my drill press:

http://www.scratchypants.com/pics/forcase.jpg

You need a good, positive stop on your drill press, though. I really like having a drill press in my reloading room, too.

What's your drill press? Cost?
I do need a drill press, always on the look out for a cheap one.

graz
01-31-2016, 10:54 AM
I have a Wilson. Does a very good job but not fast. For the high volume stuff a powered trimmer makes sense.

looch
01-31-2016, 12:25 PM
I bought a crappy Jobmate benchtop, second hand - I think it was $30. I replaced the plastic spindle clamp that connects to the depth-stop rod with a piece I made out of 3/8" aluminum plate:

http://www.scratchypants.com/pics/dpress.jpg

I got a little fancy with the contour - a plain old rectangle would have worked, too.

Rory McCanuck
01-31-2016, 12:45 PM
Very nice.
With the Forster one in the press, what controls trim length?
Is it the press' depth stop, the table, or the trimmer itself?

looch
01-31-2016, 01:06 PM
The depth stop of the press, hence the need for the my modification. I could vary the depth up to .02" with the original plastic spindle clamp. If I really reef on the depth stop, I can still get a .005" variance, so I don't do that ;D

I fasten the Forster to the base with a 3/8" bolt up through the bottom of the table into that threaded hole you see in the pic. There's a collet that is similar to what you would find in a router, except that it's stepped to accept different case diameters. You stick a case in (on) one of the collet steps, then swing that lever about 90 degrees which clamps the base of the case. The cutter consists of a mini end-mill that holds a pilot, sized according to the case mouth diameter. I think they are the same pilots used by several other brands of trimmer.