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Billythreefeathers
07-11-2017, 04:45 PM
Marilyn Poitras Resigns As MMIW Inquiry Commissioner

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2017/07/11/marilyn-poitras-resigns-as-mmiw-inquiry-commissioner_a_23025003/?utm_hp_ref=ca-homepage



OTTAWA A commissioner on the inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women has announced she will resign at the end of this week a departure that raises new questions among advocates about how much faith they can put in the much-anticipated process.

Marilyn Poitras, one of five commissioners named by the Liberal government last summer to examine the root causes of violence against Indigenous women and girls, explained her decision in a letter to Indigenous Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.


"It is clear to me that I am unable to perform my duties as a commissioner with the process designed in its current structure," the letter said, noting she will step aside as of July 15.

Poitras' resignation comes shortly after the departure of the commission's executive director, Michele Moreau, and is further evidence "the whole inquiry is in jeopardy," said Sheila North Wilson, a grand chief of an organization representing First Nations in northern Manitoba.

"I maintain that the chief commissioner needs to resign to restore any kind of faith among the families and survivors of missing and murdered Indigenous women," she said. "We shouldn't be worried about delays. We should be worried about getting the process right."

In an interview, lead commissioner Marion Buller thanked Poitras for her contributions, adding the inquiry is still prepared to move ahead with its work as planned, including nine hearings this fall beginning in September in Thunder Bay, Ont.

"I want to reassure families and survivors that we will continue to work towards hearings hearing from them, hearing about their stories, at the same time respecting Indigenous laws and traditional knowledge," she said.

"This resignation is not going to change the work that we are doing in terms of preparing the right path, the good path to hear from families and survivors."

It will be up to the Liberal government to decide if a new commissioner will be named to replace Poitras, she added.

Indigenous Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett wouldn't say Tuesday whether one will be chosen.

She said she met with the existing group on Monday, and remains confident in their ability to do the work required, but better communication on how they'll do it will be essential.

"They really do have the vision, the values, the tools and the plan to get this work done," she said.

This resignation is not going to change the work that we are doing in terms of preparing the right path, the good path to hear from families and survivors.
The commission has faced critiques from families frustrated at the pace of consultations and communications. Four staffers have resigned in recent months.

Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde said he's invited the commissioners to attend the AFN's upcoming general assembly in order to speak directly to those affected by the commission's work.

"We're very concerned about this resignation because the work of the national inquiry is too important and we want to see it succeed for the families," he said in a statement.

The federal government gave the commissioners a budget of about $53.9 million and asked them to complete their work by the end of 2018, with an interim report due in November.

Buller has already indicated more time and funding will be required but a formal application has yet to be filed to the federal government. She could not say Tuesday when the request will be made.

Billythreefeathers
07-11-2017, 04:45 PM
Baaaaa,,,, Haaaaaaa, haaaaaa,,,,,

I hope this shit show hangs around till at least 2019

soulchaser
07-11-2017, 04:54 PM
""It is clear to me that I am unable to perform my duties as a commissioner with the process designed in its current structure," the letter said, noting she will step aside as of July 15."


Guess she's waiting until payday to quit.

Zinilin
07-11-2017, 05:03 PM
"It is clear to me that I am unable to perform my duties as a commissioner with the process designed in its current structure,"

Translation: There is no evidence that supports the inquiries per-ordained conclusion and they haven't yet paid me enough to lie.

Rory McCanuck
07-11-2017, 05:33 PM
So two of the five people annointed, sorry, appointed to the council have quit, and a Manitoba grand chief figures the head of the council should quit too.
Something tells me that people were coming to conclusions that they weren't supposed/allowed to.

RangeBob
07-11-2017, 06:20 PM
There were conditions on how they were to ask questions (polite, non invasive, safe spaces, etc). It struck me at the time that if one had put those kinds of conditions on a homicide detective then no crime would be solved. I wonder if that had anything to do with it.

With any luck, a reporter will ask for details, and someone will answer on YouTube.

Relic49
07-11-2017, 06:45 PM
So two of the five people annointed, sorry, appointed to the council have quit, and a Manitoba grand chief figures the head of the council should quit too.
Something tells me that people were coming to conclusions that they weren't supposed/allowed to.

Sounds about right.

R&R Rancher
07-12-2017, 06:03 AM
I wonder what Stephen Harper thinks when he reads the news these days

Forbes/Hutton
07-12-2017, 06:20 AM
They must all be bitterly disappointed, they were all hoping it would be much more:

http://www.strangenotions.com/wp-content/uploads/Spanish-Inquisition.jpg

M1917 Enfield
07-12-2017, 07:11 AM
I wonder what Stephen Harper thinks when he reads the news these days

https://cdn.meme.am/cache/instances/folder865/250x250/75014865/stephen-harper-lolhaha-you-punted-me-out-in-favour-of-trudeau-miss-me-yet.jpg

Billythreefeathers
07-12-2017, 07:13 AM
I wonder what Stephen Harper thinks when he reads the news these days

http://i1176.photobucket.com/albums/x339/Billythreefeathers/download%202_zps76aryk2o.jpeg (http://s1176.photobucket.com/user/Billythreefeathers/media/download%202_zps76aryk2o.jpeg.html)

M1917,,, bet me by that much ;)

Strewth
07-12-2017, 12:07 PM
Why don't we just use the one the RCMP released in 2013?

http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/en/missing-and-murdered-aboriginal-women-national-operational-overview

Is it because the conclusions reached are emotionally unsatisfying?

The majority of all female homicides are solved (close to 90%) and there is little difference in solve rates between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal victims.

Female homicide victims generally know the person who kills them – more than 90% had a previous relationship with them. This is true for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal female victims.

Offenders accused of killing Aboriginal females were more likely to have a criminal record (71% compared to 45%). The most common serious conviction among offenders accused in both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal homicides was related to a violent offence, yet those accused of killing Aboriginal females were more likely to have this type of offence on their criminal records (53% compared to 27%).

An offender consumed alcohol and/or drugs at the time of the incident in more than a third of female homicides (both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal). Those accused of killing Aboriginal females were more likely to have consumed an intoxicating substance (71% compared to 31%)


....and so on and so forth. I would assume this document would be, if not the template, then at least a reference guide for the New! Improved! commission, and the facts presented therein as collected by the RCMP would be hard to refute.

If I was looking for a different answer that I perhaps "felt" was "justified" I'd probably end up recusing myself from the commission too.

I mean, really. Big surprise. Mostly harmed by people they knew, missing people go missing (and are hard to find), drugs and alcohol were present in the accused's system.

Makes one wonder what conclusion the commission is trying to reach?

Billythreefeathers
07-12-2017, 01:32 PM
Makes one wonder what conclusion the commission is trying to reach?

that the bands the victims lived in need more government money

ilikemoose
07-12-2017, 04:06 PM
This SJW inquiry is falling apart because for the " professional indians" who are immersed in identity politics there is no conclusion that will satisfy the need to blame white people.

The legitimately bereaved families, whos needs are secondary in this process wont be happy either...as if a panel of bureaucrats can heal the pain of a murdered family member.

And now we see that the process is so bad that the commissioners are giving up very large, lengthy contracts to distance themselves from this deeply disfunctional debacle before it turns into career catastrophe.

Forbes/Hutton
07-12-2017, 04:21 PM
This SJW inquiry is falling apart because for the " professional indians" who are immersed in identity politics there is no conclusion that will satisfy the need to blame white people.

The legitimately bereaved families, whos needs are secondary in this process wont be happy either...as if a panel of bureaucrats can heal the pain of a murdered family member.

And now we see that the process is so bad that the commissioners are giving up very large, lengthy contracts to distance themselves from this deeply disfunctional debacle before it turns into career catastrophe.

What they hoped for was to be able to subpoena any and all of the white killers of native women and have them admit, under oath, that "I killed her cuz she was an injun". Of course no native killers of native women would be subpoenaed in case they gave the same answer.