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Magi
07-25-2017, 02:45 PM
Another major project dies:
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-40719926

Strewth
07-25-2017, 03:00 PM
Yup, and we get left in the dust for the global LNG market. Pity we couldn't just build a couple plants as "Hero projects", while converting everything slowly to natural gas, driving down the cost of powering industry and attracting investors while becoming more energy independent. Probably crazy talk.
Better to be like the Mayor of Vancouver and go for a ban on natural gas (which is used in absolutely no restaurant, heating system, or bus in the city) because LNG is icky. And so are new hydro projects. And pipelines for Alberta oil.

tdod101
07-25-2017, 03:06 PM
Yup, and we get left in the dust for the global LNG market. Pity we couldn't just build a couple plants as "Hero projects", while converting everything slowly to natural gas, driving down the cost of powering industry and attracting investors while becoming more energy independent. Probably crazy talk.
Better to be like the Mayor of Vancouver and go for a ban on natural gas (which is used in absolutely no restaurant, heating system, or bus in the city) because LNG is icky. And so are new hydro projects. And pipelines for Alberta oil.

Really? Your mayor banned natural gas? What a moron

Billythreefeathers
07-25-2017, 03:37 PM
Despite being green-lit by the Trudeau government, the Pacific NorthWest LNG (PNW LNG) project will not be going ahead.

The PNW LNG board made the announcement Tuesday morning saying the decision was made by Petronas and its partners after a careful and total review of the project “amid changes in the market conditions.”


$36-billion Pacific NorthWest LNG project dead

http://globalnews.ca/news/3623401/36-billion-pacific-northwest-lng-project-dead/

“We are disappointed that the extremely challenging environment brought about by the prolonged depressed prices and shifts in the energy industry have led us to this decision,” Anuar Taib, Chairman of the PNW LNG Board said.

Due to low global oil prices and an increasing supply of natural gas depressing international prices for LNG, it made the economics of the project less certain than they were when it was first announced in 2013.

The $36-billion PNW LNG project, which included a pipeline and terminal proposed for Lelu Island near Prince Rupert, received conditional approval from the federal government in September 2016. Ottawa said an estimated 4,500 jobs would be created during the construction phase of the project, and 630 workers would be needed to operate the facility.

The Independent Contractors and Businesses Association (ICBA) said the decision to scrap the PNW LNG project is a “tough blow” for the B.C. constructions industry.

“We are deeply disappointed that PNW will not go forward, as it means thousands of construction jobs will not materialize,” said ICBA president Chris Gardner in a release.

Environmentalists and First Nations denounced the PNW LNG project due to concerns over climate change and salmon habitat, while pro-development advocates, including the then B.C. government of Christy Clark, called it a key economic driver for the country as a whole.

Following the approval, several First Nations and environmental groups filed lawsuits against the federal government and Malaysian state-owned oil firm Petronas in an attempt to stop a liquefied natural gas project on British Columbia’s northern coast.

For Karen Wu, acting director at the Pembina Institute, the cancellation of the project was good news since it “would have been one of the largest polluters in Canada.”

“Petronas and its partners cited shifts in the energy sector as key to their decision. Indeed, LNG demand and prices have fallen as the world transitions to renewable sources of energy. We now have an important opportunity to ensure B.C. is not left behind as the global economy shifts and the costs of a changing climate begin to mount,” Wu said in a release.

Wu said with the cancellation of the project, there’s a need for B.C.’s new government to “act quickly to stand up for healthy and safe communities, grow sustainable resource sector jobs… and make clean choices more affordable.”

Gitanyow Hereditary Chiefs and the Gitwilgyoots Tribe, filed separate lawsuits to get the Federal Court to rule that proper consultation with First Nations did not occur and that would reverse approval for the project.

More than 200 scientists and salmon experts wrote letters to the federal government in 2016 year asking the government to reject the project because of severe consequences.

The draft environmental report released in February estimated that the LNG facility would result in the equivalent of 5.3 million tonnes of carbon dioxide being released a year. That would add 8.5 per cent to B.C.’s total emissions.

Upstream emissions, including the gathering of the natural gas, are estimated to add the equivalent of 6.5 million to 8.7 million more tonnes of CO2.

Petronas and its partners said they invested a little more than $400-million in the PNW LNG and are still committed to developing a “significant” natural gas project in Canada and will be continuing to explore options.

Billythreefeathers
07-25-2017, 03:38 PM
here you have it,, Gas industry has just voted on the liberal and NDP business climate

Billythreefeathers
07-25-2017, 03:40 PM
Thanks mods

FALover
07-25-2017, 04:12 PM
This should be a wakeup call to any 'middle class' voters that thought turdo was going to be their savior.

blacksmithden
07-25-2017, 04:33 PM
Following the approval, several First Nations and environmental groups filed lawsuits against the federal government and Malaysian state-owned oil firm Petronas in an attempt to stop a liquefied natural gas project on British Columbia’s northern coast.

I dont really give a damn what the treaties say. Not one more red cent of government assistance including fighting forest fires. The first politician who says they will let them go it on their own after this has my vote...and I dont care if theyre the reincarnation of Hitler himself. This BS has gone too far for far too long.

Strewth
07-25-2017, 04:47 PM
Really? Your mayor banned natural gas? What a moron

Not my mayor, his local (printable) nickname is Mayor Moonbeam. Bike lanes for everyone! In the rainiest city in the country....
He's recanted on a full ban, that was apparently a misinterpretation. He now (I believe) wants to simply tax you to death for using evil stinky LNG.


“Petronas and its partners cited shifts in the energy sector as key to their decision. Indeed, LNG demand and prices have fallen as the world transitions to renewable sources of energy. We now have an important opportunity to ensure B.C. is not left behind as the global economy shifts and the costs of a changing climate begin to mount,” Wu said in a release.

Wu said with the cancellation of the project, there’s a need for B.C.’s new government to “act quickly to stand up for healthy and safe communities, grow sustainable resource sector jobs… and make clean choices more affordable.”

lol. LNG prices have fallen because every other country jumped on the LNG bandwagon before we did, and there is now a glut on the market...but at least they all now have the infrastructure in place to continue. We got hamstrung by feel-good measures and missed the boat.
"...grow sustainable resource sector jobs… and make clean choices more affordable." That's what we were trying to do with the LNG projects, you twit. Should we all go back to burning coal? Are we allowed to go nuclear?

How about the author of that quote, along with all the other greeners, puts their money where their mouth is, and hooks up to only solar and wind power for two years. Kids aren't allowed to leave, no interference by social services, film it 24/7 for Youtube after, say, the first frost.

soulchaser
07-25-2017, 05:53 PM
I strongly suspect the only reason Trudeau approved the project was because there was a very real possibility Petronas was going to pull the plug on it.

Carguy2550
07-25-2017, 08:48 PM
I dont really give a damn what the treaties say. Not one more red cent of government assistance including fighting forest fires. The first politician who says they will let them go it on their own after this has my vote...and I dont care if theyre the reincarnation of Hitler himself. This BS has gone too far for far too long.

As a citizen politician, not one more cent for Indians, universities, SJW cities, the UN or any other social re-engineering cause. I'll have the books balanced in 2 years or less, hopefully less, have to talk to the accountants first.

Westicle
07-25-2017, 08:57 PM
canada is losing MILLIONS everyday, the product we ship/sell to the usa is sold below world prices..... 15-20% below world prices.

our only true hope for the oil/gas patch was finding new international customers...... northern bc for example is 98% gas production, with very little oil..... no access to markets, the usa currently has a glut of their own shale gas. our province is screwed,

whats even funnier is that the usa is exporting its domestic oil & gas for the first time in decades.... for full world market prices, meanwhile they buy oil/gas from us for cheap..... think about it, 15-20% return on investment without doing anything.

RyoTHC
07-25-2017, 09:26 PM
canada is losing MILLIONS everyday, the product we ship/sell to the usa is sold below world prices..... 15-20% below world prices.

our only true hope for the oil/gas patch was finding new international customers...... northern bc for example is 98% gas production, with very little oil..... no access to markets, the usa currently has a glut of their own shale gas. our province is screwed,

whats even funnier is that the usa is exporting its domestic oil & gas for the first time in decades.... for full world market prices, meanwhile they buy oil/gas from us for cheap..... think about it, 15-20% return on investment without doing anything.

I am glad i'm not the only one that sees the bigger picture on some of these political issues... i'm as non partisan as you can be, and it seems that's what it takes to see clearly 9/10 times..

zap brannign
07-25-2017, 10:22 PM
I support gas and oil but dont support placing projects in the skeena watershed, last wild salmon and steelhead the province has.

Lee Enfield
07-25-2017, 10:43 PM
I support gas and oil but dont support placing projects in the skeena watershed, last wild salmon and steelhead the province has.

The chance of a problem with natural gas is very very slight and unlike oil a leak just goes into the air. Not good however never had any serious issues from what I have heard from a friend who has worked for decades in the industry.

With the Dippers/Greenies in power things would be tough to get thru, somehow the lefties think money grows on trees and it is limitless.

Disappointed to hear this but not surprised especially with the glut of NG in the world.

Swampdonkey
07-25-2017, 10:56 PM
What happened to natural gas being a nickel per liter? If there's such excess supply, shouldn't the price drop?

I'd convert my pickup over if it were economical to do so.

Westicle
07-26-2017, 01:26 AM
The chance of a problem with natural gas is very very slight and unlike oil a leak just goes into the air. Not good however never had any serious issues from what I have heard from a friend who has worked for decades in the industry.

depends on how scrubbed the gas is, for example most gas wells have anywhere from 1-10% h2s as well as the butanes, methanes, condy... etc etc etc (gas is sold by BTU's.... different products worth more)

most of the h2s wil be removed by infield gas plants, and the gas will be cracked into its base products at a transmission facility...... and then sent on to the transmission line, for example in northern bc all the gas comes into spectra energy FSJ(and a few others) and leaves town thru the transmission line as "house" ready..... ie: gas is stripped, h2s removed and mercaptan added for safety.

either way, a gas leak from a transmission line is so remote of a possibility its not even worth discussing.

SIR VEYOR
07-26-2017, 04:19 AM
What happened to natural gas being a nickel per liter? If there's such excess supply, shouldn't the price drop?

I'd convert my pickup over if it were economical to do so.

It's economical if you have NG at the house and can install a hose to fill with in the garage. Lots of conversion kits out there. Some very well priced to do. The better ones seem to do a diesel conversion instead of a gas, but it seems the commercial fleets are gas based converted, FWIW.

awndray
07-26-2017, 05:19 AM
Petronas isn't the only player in the game. LNG is alive and well.

They pulled the plug because of low prices. And low oil prices are not Trudeau's doing.

awndray
07-26-2017, 06:52 AM
Petronas has cancelled plans for a massive project in B.C. that would have become the largest source of climate pollution in Canada.
http://www.nationalobserver.com/2017/07/25/opinion/petronas-cancellation-highlights-need-just-transition-fossil-fuels


LOL! Okay.



The Malaysian company behind Pacific NorthWest LNG proposed to bring fracked natural gas by pipeline from B.C.’s interior and compress it into a liquid for export by tankers from an island near Prince Rupert.

Foreign fossil fuel companies are beating a retreat from big projects in Canada. Shell, Statoil and Marathon recently announced withdrawals from the Alberta oil sands. Imperial, Exxon's Canadian subsidiary, announced in January that it would "write down" 2.8 billion barrels of its bitumen reserves in Alberta. In February, US oil giant ConocoPhillips announced that 2 billion barrels of proven reserves might have to stay in the ground and Exxon itself estimated that 3.6 billion of its barrels were not going to be profitable.

Just like companies leaving the oil sands, Petronas annouced it was dropping the liquefied natural gas (LNG) project because of “changes in market conditions.”

As the international players pull up stakes, Canada’s big oil companies have been finding novel workarounds. One recent headline in the Wall Street Journal told the tale: ‘Suncor wins favour by ignoring core business of oil sands.’

Petronas' Pacific Northwest LNG, would have rivalled even the biggest oil sands operations for climate pollution.


http://www.nationalobserver.com/sites/nationalobserver.com/files/styles/body_img/public/img/2017/07/25/screen_shot_2017-07-25_at_1.28.08_pm.png?itok=bwguqd3G
Chart by the Pembina Institute. March 14, 2016.

Environment and Climate Change Canada's assessment described the Petronas project becoming "amongst the largest single point sources of greenhouse gas emission in the country."

The Pacific Northwest LNG project was strongly supported by Christy Clark’s recently departed B.C. Liberal government even though it would have shattered the province's climate targets. On its own, this one project would have accounted for "75% to 87% of the emissions allowed under B.C.’s 2050 target," according to the Pembina Institute.

Justin Trudeau’s federal Liberals gave a green light to the project even though their assessment was based on misleading and inaccurate scientific evidence, as National Observer reported. The project's climate pollution would have been responsible for a large percentage of the "gap" between the federal government's Paris promises and Canada's expected emissions, submitted to the United Nations this spring.

The timing of the cancellation is more than a little suspicious, coming just eight days after NDP Premier John Horgan was sworn into office, supported by an agreement with the BC Greens.

Partisan politickers were quick to blame the incoming NDP:



Jason Kenney
@jkenney

NDP comes to office in BC, Petronas immediately cancels its $30B LNG investment, 1 of the largest planned foreign investments in CDN history
2:11 PM - 25 Jul 2017

But independent observers noted that the timing was a bit too cute:



Shachi Kurl
✔@ShachiKurl

My guess: Petronas, in delivering Pacific Northwest LNG blow, voluntarily gifted @bcliberals a delay in bad news, or were begged to #bcpoli
2:06 PM - 25 Jul 2017

Zooming out to the big picture, it is increasingly clear that what's needed is not just the "transition" to a sustainable economy, mooted by the federal Liberals, but a national effort towards a just transitionfor fossil fuel workers.

"Around the world, there is a growing movement demanding a “just transition” for the workforce, so that workers are not left in the cold as fossil fuels become consigned to the past," writes Carbon Brief in a 2017 survey of global policies.

Some in British Columbia were celebrating the climate and environmental "win" from Petronas' decision.


Ash Kelly
@AshDKelly

The north in general will be wondering what @NDP govt will do to bolster economic growth outside of resource development




Ash Kelly
@AshDKelly

For those in #LaxKwalaams who rely on salmon as cultural and food source this will be seen as a victory
2:42 PM - 25 Jul 2017




Protect BC Species
@BCspecies

"plan to jeopardize BC’s second largest salmon run and blow our provincial climate targets” is cancelled!
3:54 PM - 25 Jul 2017

Others noted the important role of local community resistance:



Kai Nagata
@kainagata

Skeena residents are 3-0 when it comes to oil & gas megaprojects that threaten their salmon. Shell, Enbridge, Petronas. #bcpoli #cdnpoli
1:48 PM - 25 Jul 2017


As National Observer recently reported, fossil fuel companies are getting increasingly desperate portraying the future of their business. Exxon and Imperial Oil have just been embroiled in the #Exxonknew scandal with a court order from New York's attorney general.

Workers in the fossil fuel sectors — and Canada's economy as a whole — need industries that are there for the future, not ones that are willing to risk fraud charges to eke out some more years in business.

If you want to track the full story on just transition for workers and the massive energy transition going on all around us, here's one media outlet with the team and focus to get the story to you. Thanks to the support of readers like you who subscribe, National Observer is amping up its mission to investigate and report on the climate stories determining our future.

Strewth
07-26-2017, 08:19 AM
^I agree this cannot be laid at the feet of the NDP(as much as I would like to:)); however I lol'ed at the "just transition" idea for oil patch workers, because fossil fuels are a thing of the past. Somebody better tell the shipping and aerospace industries. Wouldn't be terrible to let SpaceX know either, wouldn't want to continue making chemically fuelled rockets. Perhaps a wind powered rocket.
Not a bad idea to let all the developing nations know that they're not allowed to advance either, no pesky energy from hydrocarbons for them! Delicate, unproven, sporadically useful, subsidised energy sources, that's the ticket.

awndray
07-26-2017, 10:59 AM
In completely unrelated news...


B.C. Premier Horgan tells environment minister to “employ every tool available” against Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion

British Columbia's new premier handed his cabinet ministers their to-do lists on Monday, and the tasks include a mix of both campaign promises and new plans.

"I expect my ministers to work hard every day to deliver on our commitments and make life better for people," Horgan said in a statement. "It will take time to fix the problems, but we're committed to getting it done, one step at a time."

Finance Minister Carole James has been told to balance next year's budget and increase the carbon tax by $5 per tonne per year, starting next April.

Environment Minister George Heyman's mandate letter stated that he has been tasked with enacting an endangered species law and told to “employ every tool available” to defend British Columbia's interests in the face of the expansion of the Kinder Morgan pipeline.

He must also introduce a new legislated target for reducing carbon pollution, including separate targets and plans for industry.

Energy Minister Michelle Mungall's mandate includes making sure liquefied natural gas projects benefit British Columbians and meet the province's climate commitments.

Her letter also said she must refer the Site C dam project to the B.C. Utilities Commission for a review on "the question of economic viability and consequences to British Columbians in the context of the current supply and demand conditions prevailing in the B.C. market."

The former Liberal government approved the nearly $9-billion hydroelectric generation project in northeast B.C.
http://www.jwnenergy.com/article/2017/7/bc-premier-horgan-tells-environment-minister-employ-every-tool-available-against-kinder-morgan-pipeline-expansion/

Grey_Wolf
07-26-2017, 11:09 AM
depends on how scrubbed the gas is, for example most gas wells have anywhere from 1-10% h2s as well as the butanes, methanes, condy... etc etc etc (gas is sold by BTU's.... different products worth more)

most of the h2s wil be removed by infield gas plants, and the gas will be cracked into its base products at a transmission facility...... and then sent on to the transmission line, for example in northern bc all the gas comes into spectra energy FSJ(and a few others) and leaves town thru the transmission line as "house" ready..... ie: gas is stripped, h2s removed and mercaptan added for safety.

either way, a gas leak from a transmission line is so remote of a possibility its not even worth discussing.

Not necessarily true. While that may be the case where you are we have a lot of sweet wells around here in central Alberta. Can't remember the last time I went to a rig that was drilling gas that was sour. Lots of drilling for gas around here that they want the condy as it is quite a high grade that is sold to Ft. Mac

ilikemoose
07-26-2017, 11:11 AM
BC is completely screwed.

Christy Clark opposed the Northern Gateway pipeline and terminal, promising that the LNG industry would drive our economy.

Now we have missed out on both Northern Gateway, and Petronas...that's over 20 Billion dollars that could have been invested in BC (and largely in rural BC) gone because British Columbia is not open for business or investment.

This is complete bull.

Doug_M
07-26-2017, 11:18 AM
^I agree this cannot be laid at the feet of the NDP(as much as I would like to:));

I don't know. They may only just be in power but they had a campaign of course, full of promises (or warnings depending on your outlook).

http://business.financialpost.com/commodities/energy/a-tragedy-for-canada-petronas-cancels-36b-lng-project-as-b-c-jacks-up-demands/wcm/de2567c8-499d-489f-9dec-3826a01c932c

‘A tragedy for Canada’: Petronas cancels $36B LNG project as B.C. jacks up demands
Claudia Cattaneo: With energy prices collapsing and industry struggling to stay viable, Pacific NorthWest LNG needed less, not more government costs and regulations


British Columbia’s new NDP/Green coalition government was in damage control mode after the most ambitious of the province’s proposed liquefied natural gas (LNG) projects, the $36-billion Pacific NorthWest LNG, was cancelled Tuesday.

Both the province and the Malaysian company that proposed it blamed poor global LNG market conditions. The truth is that what should have been a magnificent new Canadian industry, building middle-class jobs from exporting Western Canada’s world-class Montney shale gas to reduce carbon pollution in Asia, has unraveled due in large part to government mishandling — plus fears it would have only accelerated under the new, anti-development provincial government.

The proof is that the LNG export industry is thriving in the United States under the same global market conditions, while B.C. has yet to see the construction of a single project out of 20 or so proposed since 2011.

Dennis McConaghy, a former senior executive at energy company TransCanada Corp., called the decision “a tragedy for Canada … a real condemnation of this country and the utterly unproductive entities in it that simply make any development virtually impossible.”
With energy prices collapsing globally, and the business in B.C. having a tough time remaining viable, Pacific NorthWest LNG needed less, not more government costs and regulations to stay in the game.

Instead, the new provincial government jacked up its demands, including higher carbon taxes, a “fair” return for resources (read a bigger provincial take), partnerships with First Nations (read fatter benefits agreements), protection for “our air, land and water including living up to our climate change commitments,” as outlined in Premier John Horgan’s mandate letter to the new energy minister, Michelle Mungall.

To make matters worse, Horgan repeatedly singled out Pacific NorthWest LNG during his election campaign as one that was “poorly sited” and that he would relocate (read another environmental assessment and, of course, more costs).

The news came after the former provincial Liberal government’s drawn-out drama to come up with fiscal terms, a federal regulatory review that dragged on for three years and opposition and lawsuits from aboriginals and environmentalists worried about the impact on everything from climate change to migrating salmon.

“It’s hard to find anything so mishandled,” said former Newfoundland Premier Brian Peckford, who now lives on Vancouver Island. “Sitting on trillions of cubic feet of reserves in northeast B.C., the B.C. government dilly-dallied … by the time (it) got around to a royalty/tax structure for the various projects lined up to go, it was too late. The Australian and American interests had outflanked them and the rest is history.”

In response to the announcement, Mungall said her government is “committed to working with the LNG industry to ensure we are competitive” and reached out to other proponents to “ensure that we are ready to work with them going forward and have a road map for full realization of their projects.”

Those include the Royal Dutch Shell PLC led LNG Canada project, which is expected to decide by the end of next year whether to move forward, and Woodfibre LNG Ltd. Both are going through the same process as Pacific NorthWest LNG – looking for cost savings to match lower gas prices.

Meanwhile, the provincial government will support natural gas production, Mungall said. It’ll be interesting to see how that part of the industry is handled, after the NDP promised a review of fracking that could also mean more costs and delays.

The death of the LNG project follows an exodus of international companies from Alberta’s oil and gas sector for the same reasons: high costs (including carbon taxes) and slow regulatory processes compared to competing jurisdictions.

The capital flight is rightly worrying the Canadian Chamber of Commerce. President Perrin Beatty, in a letter Tuesday, asked Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to find ways to cut business costs to offset the impact of an emissions plan that includes a minimum carbon price beginning next year. “The cost of doing business in Canada is rising,” Beatty said in the letter, which was also sent to the country’s provincial premiers.

Petronas isn’t leaving Canada — for now. It has invested about $11 billion out of the $36 billion so far, including $10 billion to purchase Progress Energy Corp. and to drill for gas in the Montney, $400 million to develop the export terminal site near Prince Rupert, and another $500 million for planning to build a pipeline.
“We continue to believe that an LNG industry can thrive in British Columbia with the right project at the right time,” Anuar Taib, chairman of the Pacific NorthWest LNG board of directors, told reporters. “Our experience tells us that the development of the LNG business requires a long-term view of the market, world-class natural gas resources, competitive project cost and supportive market conditions.” But there is no going back on the LNG decision, he said, and all options will be looked at to monetize and develop the resource.

The company said it hasn’t locked up deals with U.S. LNG export facilities. Don’t be surprised if that’s where Petronas — and partners Japex, Petroleum Brunei, Indian Oil Corp. and Sinopec — end up shipping their B.C. Montney gas, instead of through the terminal they wanted to build on the much-closer B.C. coast, leaving less money on the table for Canadian governments with big expectations.

Strewth
07-26-2017, 11:59 AM
^Oh, not saying that the NDP were trying to help! But I think the BC Liberals were too late to the party.
https://cdn.theconversation.com/files/131701/area14mp/image-20160725-31178-tt1r4y.jpg

Swampdonkey
07-26-2017, 12:04 PM
It's economical if you have NG at the house and can install a hose to fill with in the garage. Lots of conversion kits out there. Some very well priced to do. The better ones seem to do a diesel conversion instead of a gas, but it seems the commercial fleets are gas based converted, FWIW.

My grandfather had an 84 Ford on natural gas. Gutless, but cheap and easy to switch back to gasoline, so as not to be hostage to one fuel.

awndray
07-26-2017, 12:12 PM
Enbridge uses a hybrid system for their fleet. They obviously have the fill stations, but certainly possible for anyone to get one, provided they pay for it.

Swampdonkey
07-27-2017, 05:10 PM
Globalist viewpoint:

8
https://youtu.be/EX3ZaqIutGo

Joshua13
07-27-2017, 11:31 PM
I don't see what the big deal is, I mean all of Vancouver is going to be gas free in a few years. Thats what the mayor said right? And I mean every one can afford baseboard heating and nobody wants to go a restaurant and have a grilled steak. Thats all absurd. You people are way out of line.

Sent from my E6560T using Tapatalk

VooDoo
07-28-2017, 10:01 AM
Mike Smyth: NDP had nothing to do with Petronas collapse? Really?

http://theprovince.com/news/bc-politics/mike-smyth-ndp-had-nothing-to-do-with-petronas-collapse-really

ilikemoose
07-28-2017, 01:15 PM
Christy Clark just resigned.

I hope that her decision was at least in part influenced by the fact that she banked so much of BC's economic future on this project, and failed to deliver.

rgallant
07-28-2017, 01:27 PM
BC has no hope of any new business investment, between enviro/native and NIMB protesters this province is no place to do business