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View Full Version : Cheap arrows?



Grizz Axxemann
09-26-2019, 10:55 PM
This video came up in my recommended feed the other night. Pretty interesting, because I shoot budget arrows.

https://youtu.be/pXBmxXSCK4I

road kill
09-27-2019, 05:36 AM
Not an archery guy but still interesting info.

lone-wolf
09-27-2019, 03:32 PM
What kind of cheap arrows are you using Grizz? I picked up a recurve bow last fall but haven't gotten arrows or a target yet, so aside from losing one arrow, I haven't used it yet.

linung
09-27-2019, 06:44 PM
Last cheap arrow I got was from Princess Auto. I think it was like 7 or 8 bucks for 5. I picked them up to make a reloader for my Henry.

kennymo
09-27-2019, 07:17 PM
I shoot the least expensive Easton hunting arrows. I’m thinking they’re pretty damn similar to the Cabela’s by Easton seen here. Dinner plate at 60 yards outdoors. Pretty damn good for a guy who doesn’t practise enough.... The neighbour is a bit more of a fanatic and can manage the same size group at 80 yards with the Easton FMJ’s. They are a damn good arrow, but I think the extra $$$ per shaft would be lost on me.....

Grizz Axxemann
09-27-2019, 10:11 PM
What kind of cheap arrows are you using Grizz? I picked up a recurve bow last fall but haven't gotten arrows or a target yet, so aside from losing one arrow, I haven't used it yet.

I use Carbon Express Adrenaline 350s. They're pre-fletched with inserts installed. The 150s (.500 spine) and 250s (.400 spine) are 30" long, and the 350s (.350 spine) are 31" long. My hunting setup weighs in at about 460 grains per arrow, delivering 88 ft lbs of energy at about 295fps (calculated.) I haven't calculated the numbers on the Stalkers yet, but they look promising. They're a little lighter in shaft weight since they've been cut to 30" and have a lower gpi from the start, and I don't know what the inserts, nocks or vanes weigh (yes, it all factors in) but they should fly a bit faster. But without knowing the weights of the guts, and knowing that the shaft weight is within .10 grains per inch, it's probably a wash when you calculate the kinetic energy.

The trick is to select an arrow based on your draw weight and length. The higher the weight/longer the draw, the stiffer the spine you want, for the most part. Factor in the length of the arrow and the spine will behave differently based on different lengths, getting stiffer as it gets shorter. Too much spine and you'll lose accuracy, too little spine and you'll eventually blow arrows apart. Carbon fiber shrapnel and splinters are a bad day from what I'm told. There's a page on Easton's website (https://eastonarchery.com/2014/07/making-sense-of-arrow-spine/) that does a great job of explaining it all.

If you have a bow shop nearby it might be worth the drive to head over there and talk to the bow techs. I just don't trust the staff at CT or Cabela's that much to know their stuff. Sure, you get the rare gem, but stick to the smaller bow shops. Odds are better that the staff there eat, breathe and sleep archery. Of course, bring your rig with you, most shops (at least every single bow shop I've ever walked in to, save for one) have an indoor range. They might have some demo arrows you can try out.

I'm still on the hunt for a block or bag that can stop one of my arrows from 10 feet. I'd love to set up across the living room just to work on my form. It would scare the crap outta the cats, and probably drive Missy nuts, but unless I buy one of those rather pricey trainers, I'm stuck either burning gas to go to the cabin, the gun club, or one of the bow shops in town, then paying said bow shop $15 for an hour or so of time.

lone-wolf
09-28-2019, 06:36 AM
Oh yea, the local taxidermy/hunting shop is owned by this guy, so I'm definitely going to be picking his brain and joining his club once I get onto the fundamentals.
https://archerycanada.ca/archery-canada-contracts-duncan-crawford-as-head-coach-paralympic-team/

Stew
09-28-2019, 12:59 PM
I use Carbon Express Adrenaline 350s. They're pre-fletched with inserts installed. The 150s (.500 spine) and 250s (.400 spine) are 30" long, and the 350s (.350 spine) are 31" long. My hunting setup weighs in at about 460 grains per arrow, delivering 88 ft lbs of energy at about 295fps (calculated.) I haven't calculated the numbers on the Stalkers yet, but they look promising. They're a little lighter in shaft weight since they've been cut to 30" and have a lower gpi from the start, and I don't know what the inserts, nocks or vanes weigh (yes, it all factors in) but they should fly a bit faster. But without knowing the weights of the guts, and knowing that the shaft weight is within .10 grains per inch, it's probably a wash when you calculate the kinetic energy.

The trick is to select an arrow based on your draw weight and length. The higher the weight/longer the draw, the stiffer the spine you want, for the most part. Factor in the length of the arrow and the spine will behave differently based on different lengths, getting stiffer as it gets shorter. Too much spine and you'll lose accuracy, too little spine and you'll eventually blow arrows apart. Carbon fiber shrapnel and splinters are a bad day from what I'm told. There's a page on Easton's website (https://eastonarchery.com/2014/07/making-sense-of-arrow-spine/) that does a great job of explaining it all.

If you have a bow shop nearby it might be worth the drive to head over there and talk to the bow techs. I just don't trust the staff at CT or Cabela's that much to know their stuff. Sure, you get the rare gem, but stick to the smaller bow shops. Odds are better that the staff there eat, breathe and sleep archery. Of course, bring your rig with you, most shops (at least every single bow shop I've ever walked in to, save for one) have an indoor range. They might have some demo arrows you can try out.

I'm still on the hunt for a block or bag that can stop one of my arrows from 10 feet. I'd love to set up across the living room just to work on my form. It would scare the crap outta the cats, and probably drive Missy nuts, but unless I buy one of those rather pricey trainers, I'm stuck either burning gas to go to the cabin, the gun club, or one of the bow shops in town, then paying said bow shop $15 for an hour or so of time.

I don't do pointed sticks but my buddy who does suggested this, stacked corrugated cardboard, says it will stop from 10 feet
.
18248

kennymo
09-28-2019, 02:09 PM
I briefly shot at the archery club at the Air Force base here. They used cardboard slices sandwiched in a 2x4 frame, with threaded rod and washers to set the tension. Worked well, labour intensive but cheap to replace when they started to get shot out.

Grizz Axxemann
09-29-2019, 01:36 PM
I don't do pointed sticks but my buddy who does suggested this, stacked corrugated cardboard, says it will stop from 10 feet
.
18248
What velocity is he shooting? I live in a rental, and the last thing I want is over-penetration. I'm driving through an 18" foam block target as it is. Not near as bad as my dad with his crossbow, but I'm driving my arrows pretty hard.

wolver
09-29-2019, 05:55 PM
Wouldn't it be a fantastic job creation opportunity for native Canadians to set up shop manufacturing homemade arrows.
Surely they could get Gov't funding, and who wouldn't buy an authentic Indian arrow.

Grizz Axxemann
09-30-2019, 09:32 AM
Depends on where they source the components from. Last I heard no one in Canada is making carbon fiber shafts.

My BiL is set up to assemble his own. I'm sure if I stopped buying pre-fletched shafts, he'd put mine together too.

Justice
10-01-2019, 12:00 PM
"...an authentic Indian arrow..." Aside from that being racist, there's no such thing. 19th Century native arrows wouldn't stand up to a modern bow anyway.
A great deal depends on what one considers to be 'cheap'. I think I paid close to $50 for a dozen cedar 3 fletch 25 or more years ago. Last time I looked(not recently) the Al hunting arrows I have were running $15 each. Somewhere around $100 per dozen.

Grizz Axxemann
10-02-2019, 12:21 AM
Wooden arrows are best served for those oddball codgers who use recurve or long bows. Get with the times and go with a compound and shoot carbon shafts. Or if you've got deep pockets, Aluminum-carbon composites :D

lone-wolf
10-02-2019, 03:25 PM
I shoot 1911s and I thought a recurve would fit in with my style

Grizz Axxemann
10-02-2019, 09:19 PM
I'm a 1911 fan too, but I prefer compounds.

But then again, I've gotten rid of all but two of my bolt guns for MSRs. But I still have a preference for all steel, hammer fired autopistols.