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Mumbles Marble Mouth
01-16-2013, 01:27 AM
http://i1253.photobucket.com/albums/hh593/NoBark/M142_zpsec52f0ac.png

As of today, Jan 15th, 2013, I have officially entered the ranks of an M305 (M-14) owner. Always wanted one, and well actually shopping for 7.62x39 ammo, I happen to see the M305 on the shelf and decided f@#$ it on the 7.62x39 ammo. Tips and tricks from experianced Norinco M305 owners would be great if you can leave them in the comments. ;) I'll do a range report when ever I get a chance to shoot it.

Strewth
01-16-2013, 01:37 AM
Tips and tricks are ze bottom Battle Rifles Sticky, right above your thread;)
Lots of reading and watching for you! There are some very experienced members on this forum for you to ask things of...but Sticky first:)!
Nice rifle, congratulations!

bradofcanada
01-16-2013, 02:27 AM
Maybe just a spring guide but you really don't need to do anything with it right now but grease it up and go have some fun.

Asphalt Cowboy
01-16-2013, 06:06 AM
prize possession for sure ..if you ever get rid of everything else make sure you hang on to that ..

jwirecom109
01-16-2013, 07:25 AM
The addiction to M14's has started you will have more....

JustBen
01-16-2013, 08:40 AM
I thought I could get away with only one... I was wrong.

The first step is to shoot the snot out of it.

Some good upgrades are mentioned in the stickies. If it were me I'd do the following:
1. Buy a new op rod spring guide and spring. Treeline m14 sells both together
2. Break the welds and pull the flash hider so you can shim the gas system.
3. Swap the plastic norinco stock for a USGI wood or fiberglass stock when you can find one.
4. Buy a second M14 when you realize that there are many different ways you can take the M14 and begin the process again.

jwirecom109
01-16-2013, 09:16 AM
I thought I could get away with only one... I was wrong.

The first step is to shoot the snot out of it.

Some good upgrades are mentioned in the stickies. If it were me I'd do the following:
1. Buy a new op rod spring guide and spring. Treeline m14 sells both together
2. Break the welds and pull the flash hider so you can shim the gas system.
3. Swap the plastic norinco stock for a USGI wood or fiberglass stock when you can find one.
4. Buy a second M14 when you realize that there are many different ways you can take the M14 and begin the process again.

Yep pretty much what i did except for 4..... yet

BuckingFastard
01-16-2013, 05:05 PM
Congrats on the new aquirement! Like the they said welcome to the club and and I bet you can't stop at just one :)

Mumbles Marble Mouth
01-16-2013, 05:49 PM
I'll read that M14 sticky then I'll ask more questions after. Thanks guys.

Holy crap thats a lot of stuff to soak in. Anyone know when an M-14 Seminar on Vancouver Island will take place? I learn better with hands on rather than reading.

Jay
07-19-2013, 02:26 PM
I have one of the "older" M14-S models from Norinco, that came with a wood stock. It must have been sitting on a shelf for a long time because the little bag supposed to be containing grease was instead containing a greasy powder. Anyway, I had cleaned it up, replaced the spring guide rod with the target guide rod (it came with a flat rod, replacement was more like a steel nail so the spring coils properly), and installed a bolt buffer (1/4" plastic plate, seated at the front of the receiver). It shoots well, and I'd be tempted to call it sub-MOA but its right on that edge.

I've put 1000 rounds through it, and two distinct problems keep coming up: 1) the rare stovepipe (FTEject) and 2) failure to feed (common, one in four rounds!).. #2 is related either to the magazine, or the bolt buffer (causes a shorter stroke, possibly transferring the extra energy into a bounce, further reducing the time to strip a round from the mag). A friend at the range suggested using linesman pliers (square-nose) to adjust the magazine, allowing the next cartridge to ride a little higher (0.010" to 0.050") to be stripped by the bolt. The unfed round tends to have a mark from the bolt on the top of its head. This is otherwise a fun rifle to own, and if I could learn to tune it better, it would be very reliable. A high-speed camera would be marvelous to have for this.