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View Full Version : looking for an accurate .308 winchester do it all load. moose, deer and range shooting.



happykal
03-24-2013, 01:22 PM
I just started reloading an have found my self drowning in options. What type of Brass? What type of powder? what type of primer? what type of bullets? after spending a couple days in the fetal position on the kitchen floor I continued my research. Does any one have any do it load recipes they'd be willing to share.

So far i'm going to use once fired federal brass,cci 200 primers, h4895 powder, and nosler ballistic tip 165 grain bullets. I'm still waiting on my nosler manuel so i haven't loaded any rounds also waiting on my sierra 165 game king sbt's.

Why 165 because it's heavier then 150 and something different then my 180s

If you can offer any advice that'd be awesome.

Ryvax
03-24-2013, 01:24 PM
Tagged for interest. Also will be starting to reload .308

Rory McCanuck
03-24-2013, 02:37 PM
You certainly should be able to find a winning load with those components.
The only thing to watch out for, a lot of Federal brass has "loose" primer pockets. Not that there is anything wrong with them, but the pockets sem to be a touch bigger. I found Winchester primers almost fell into the pockets, and I bought a brick of Federal primers to see if they fit any better. Now that I think about it, I haven't used any of them in Federal brass...
I'm not sure if CCIs are going to seat nicely or not, just something to keep an eye out for.

You picked a great chambering to start reloading with, because there is no end of good components that will work well. Unfotunately, as you pointed out, the almost infinite choices can be pretty overwhelming. Just one hint, test one bullet, at one overall length, with varying weights of one powder at a time. Only change one variable at a time, and try to keep it simple for yourself.

Keep meticulous notes. Keep your targets. Put load notes on the targets.
That way, when a great looking target falls out of the book onto the floor, and you think "Gee that looks pretty good, I think I'll try that again" the info will be there.
I say this, because I just ran across a pretty good looking target the other day, with a bullet I know I haven't been able to find a good load for. It took a few minutes to find it in my load notes, and then I remembered. In my load notes is the notation" Fxxxing obnoxious recoil" which relit the lightbulb. I think that load may have been the culprit in causing a broken forearm on my rifle. Shot a really tight little group, but I will definitely not be making any more of them.
You will not remember it. Write It Down!

Have fun reloading, its a great pasttime, and don't be afraid to ask questions.

happykal
03-25-2013, 08:45 AM
You certainly should be able to find a winning load with those components.
The only thing to watch out for, a lot of Federal brass has "loose" primer pockets. Not that there is anything wrong with them, but the pockets sem to be a touch bigger. I found Winchester primers almost fell into the pockets, and I bought a brick of Federal primers to see if they fit any better. Now that I think about it, I haven't used any of them in Federal brass...
I'm not sure if CCIs are going to seat nicely or not, just something to keep an eye out for.

You picked a great chambering to start reloading with, because there is no end of good components that will work well. Unfotunately, as you pointed out, the almost infinite choices can be pretty overwhelming. Just one hint, test one bullet, at one overall length, with varying weights of one powder at a time. Only change one variable at a time, and try to keep it simple for yourself.

Keep meticulous notes. Keep your targets. Put load notes on the targets.
That way, when a great looking target falls out of the book onto the floor, and you think "Gee that looks pretty good, I think I'll try that again" the info will be there.
I say this, because I just ran across a pretty good looking target the other day, with a bullet I know I haven't been able to find a good load for. It took a few minutes to find it in my load notes, and then I remembered. In my load notes is the notation" Fxxxing obnoxious recoil" which relit the lightbulb. I think that load may have been the culprit in causing a broken forearm on my rifle. Shot a really tight little group, but I will definitely not be making any more of them.
You will not remember it. Write It Down!

Have fun reloading, its a great pasttime, and don't be afraid to ask questions.

Thanks for the heads up on the loose primer pockets.

I intend to try the same combination in small groups. Each group I'd try a different powder weight then compare results.

And notes diffidently will be taken in my "range journal" with every grouping. It's just a small Write In The Rain Journal I take when I go shooting. I at one time took my 870 out with 3 brands of steel shot #3s and BBs and patterned it with IC lead, M Lead, Ext over decoys(Modified steel) and extended Pass Shooting (Full choke Steel). Tried patterened at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50. Modified Lead is basiclly the equivalent to Full Choke steel and patterned the best with 3" Kent #3s and BB Black cloud 3 1/2s. That's the only thing I can remember because a wet dog laying on a journal is a recipe for failure and all data was lost. Hence the Write In The Rain lol. It's okay I have to pattern again any way. I have a 26' barrel now instead of a 28". and I'm changing my choice of ammo. No more 3 1/2 flinchers

NorCalDustin
03-25-2013, 11:14 AM
You certainly should be able to find a winning load with those components.
The only thing to watch out for, a lot of Federal brass has "loose" primer pockets. Not that there is anything wrong with them, but the pockets sem to be a touch bigger. I found Winchester primers almost fell into the pockets, and I bought a brick of Federal primers to see if they fit any better. Now that I think about it, I haven't used any of them in Federal brass...
I'm not sure if CCIs are going to seat nicely or not, just something to keep an eye out for.

You picked a great chambering to start reloading with, because there is no end of good components that will work well. Unfotunately, as you pointed out, the almost infinite choices can be pretty overwhelming. Just one hint, test one bullet, at one overall length, with varying weights of one powder at a time. Only change one variable at a time, and try to keep it simple for yourself.

Keep meticulous notes. Keep your targets. Put load notes on the targets.
That way, when a great looking target falls out of the book onto the floor, and you think "Gee that looks pretty good, I think I'll try that again" the info will be there.
I say this, because I just ran across a pretty good looking target the other day, with a bullet I know I haven't been able to find a good load for. It took a few minutes to find it in my load notes, and then I remembered. In my load notes is the notation" Fxxxing obnoxious recoil" which relit the lightbulb. I think that load may have been the culprit in causing a broken forearm on my rifle. Shot a really tight little group, but I will definitely not be making any more of them.
You will not remember it. Write It Down!

Have fun reloading, its a great pasttime, and don't be afraid to ask questions.

I think thats really good advice... So for example, 44 Rem Mag, this is what i do:

I look in the Lee manual I have, which recommends 13.1gr of BlueDot with a 240gr Jacketed round as a STARTING point and 14.4 as Max (If I remember correctly). I see that Alliant recommends 13.7gr with 240gr Jacketed bullets as a Max.

I then prepare enough brass all in the same way (for 44 Mag I also seal the primers)... I then start ~1gr lower than the Lee starting point and work up in .2gr increments until almost at the max recommended by Lee.

So I get these loads:
.44 Rem Mag, 240gr Jacketed Bullet, OAL: 1.600", 12.2gr of Alliant BlueDot
.44 Rem Mag, 240gr Jacketed Bullet, OAL: 1.600", 12.4gr of Alliant BlueDot
.44 Rem Mag, 240gr Jacketed Bullet, OAL: 1.600", 12.6gr of Alliant BlueDot
.44 Rem Mag, 240gr Jacketed Bullet, OAL: 1.600", 12.8gr of Alliant BlueDot
.44 Rem Mag, 240gr Jacketed Bullet, OAL: 1.600", 13.0gr of Alliant BlueDot
.44 Rem Mag, 240gr Jacketed Bullet, OAL: 1.600", 13.2gr of Alliant BlueDot
.44 Rem Mag, 240gr Jacketed Bullet, OAL: 1.600", 13.4gr of Alliant BlueDot
.44 Rem Mag, 240gr Jacketed Bullet, OAL: 1.600", 13.6gr of Alliant BlueDot
.44 Rem Mag, 240gr Jacketed Bullet, OAL: 1.600", 13.8gr of Alliant BlueDot
.44 Rem Mag, 240gr Jacketed Bullet, OAL: 1.600", 14.0gr of Alliant BlueDot


I then group them all at the range and am careful too look for signs of over pressure... If lets say I get to 13.8gr and I feel I'm starting to push my Max and I'm not getting enough benefit from it, then I will stop right there. When I get home I will pull the 14.0gr loads. I save my targets which each should have 2-3 groups of 3 or 4 rounds (normally I load 10 rounds at each charge).

In my case I found that my best groups were with 13.4gr of BlueDot... Next I'll mess with the OAL and will keep it within the Min & Max in my Lee Manual.

happykal
03-25-2013, 11:07 PM
I think thats really good advice... So for example, 44 Rem Mag, this is what i do:

I look in the Lee manual I have, which recommends 13.1gr of BlueDot with a 240gr Jacketed round as a STARTING point and 14.4 as Max (If I remember correctly). I see that Alliant recommends 13.7gr with 240gr Jacketed bullets as a Max.

I then prepare enough brass all in the same way (for 44 Mag I also seal the primers)... I then start ~1gr lower than the Lee starting point and work up in .2gr increments until almost at the max recommended by Lee.

So I get these loads:
.44 Rem Mag, 240gr Jacketed Bullet, OAL: 1.600", 12.2gr of Alliant BlueDot
.44 Rem Mag, 240gr Jacketed Bullet, OAL: 1.600", 12.4gr of Alliant BlueDot
.44 Rem Mag, 240gr Jacketed Bullet, OAL: 1.600", 12.6gr of Alliant BlueDot
.44 Rem Mag, 240gr Jacketed Bullet, OAL: 1.600", 12.8gr of Alliant BlueDot
.44 Rem Mag, 240gr Jacketed Bullet, OAL: 1.600", 13.0gr of Alliant BlueDot
.44 Rem Mag, 240gr Jacketed Bullet, OAL: 1.600", 13.2gr of Alliant BlueDot
.44 Rem Mag, 240gr Jacketed Bullet, OAL: 1.600", 13.4gr of Alliant BlueDot
.44 Rem Mag, 240gr Jacketed Bullet, OAL: 1.600", 13.6gr of Alliant BlueDot
.44 Rem Mag, 240gr Jacketed Bullet, OAL: 1.600", 13.8gr of Alliant BlueDot
.44 Rem Mag, 240gr Jacketed Bullet, OAL: 1.600", 14.0gr of Alliant BlueDot


I then group them all at the range and am careful too look for signs of over pressure... If lets say I get to 13.8gr and I feel I'm starting to push my Max and I'm not getting enough benefit from it, then I will stop right there. When I get home I will pull the 14.0gr loads. I save my targets which each should have 2-3 groups of 3 or 4 rounds (normally I load 10 rounds at each charge).

In my case I found that my best groups were with 13.4gr of BlueDot... Next I'll mess with the OAL and will keep it within the Min & Max in my Lee Manual.

Yeah that's basically my plan. With a different recipe of course. Just could figure a way to say it in a shorter way.

NorCalDustin
03-25-2013, 11:26 PM
Yeah of course... It's just a process that take time.

blacksmithden
03-27-2013, 07:35 AM
I have to agree with everything Rory said. I used to be the worst guy in the world for trying to keep things in my head. It just won't work. Write everything down. The one other thing is, don't become discouraged if things just don't seem to be panning out with a particular load and bullet. I have one Stevens in 300wm that was driving me up the wall. I must have fired over 1000 rounds out of that thing trying to work up a load. I was beginning to think there was either something wrong with me or the rifle. Eventually, I found a bullet and powder it was happy with and got it shooting under an inch.

In my observations, brass selection isn't that high on the list of accuracy variables. Number one, by far, is powder charge. Number 2 is bullet selection, and number 3 is how you fire them...as in, how hot do you let the rifle get at the range while doing testing. Those 3 things right there make up 90% of your accuracy model. After those, primers, brass, case length, bullet seating depth, ambient temperature when shooting, etc, make up the other 10%.

happykal
03-27-2013, 09:11 AM
In my observations, brass selection isn't that high on the list of accuracy variables. Number one, by far, is powder charge. Number 2 is bullet selection, and number 3 is how you fire them...as in, how hot do you let the rifle get at the range while doing testing. Those 3 things right there make up 90% of your accuracy model. After those, primers, brass, case length, bullet seating depth, ambient temperature when shooting, etc, make up the other 10%.

Thanks for the info. You observations are noted and appreciated.

happykal
03-27-2013, 09:17 AM
i went to my local gun shop and ordered more reloading components. 100 brass, 2 containers of imr 4895. 2 containers of h4895. 100 sierra 165 sbt game king, 50 barnes tipped tsx 165grain and a box of 1000 cci 200 primers. I didnt get the total cost from him yet. he has to see what he can get in right now, but i used cabelas prices as a reference. I had no idea how much money I just spent lol. I guarantee Jim's price will be better if not at par with cabelas. My wife just shrugged when i told her i can reload roughly 160 rounds per 1lbs container of 4895. 7000 grains per container averaged 44 grains per load. my family has created a saying on my behalf. apparently if you buy an abundance of ammo you are "kalvining it" lol
My purchase aside i have a few questions. How many times do you reload your brass? what is a good rule of thumb when it comes to trimming brass? My Sierra Manuel says "trim to length" 2.005. Should I do this every time And should I do it before or after resizing? What's the ideal bullet depth seating?

Also on average how much is your cost per round average? I realize that you powder and bullet choice is a huge factor but I'm basically trying to find out if you are saving money reloading posed to just buying factory ammo.

blacksmithden
03-27-2013, 09:33 AM
i went to my local gun shop and ordered more reloading components. 100 brass, 2 containers of imr 4895. 2 containers of h4895. 100 sierra 165 sbt game king, 50 barnes tipped tsx 165grain and a box of 1000 cci 200 primers. I didnt get the total cost from him yet. he has to see what he can get in right now, but i used cabelas prices as a reference. I had no idea how much money I just spent lol. I guarantee Jim's price will be better if not at par with cabelas. My wife just shrugged when i told her i can reload roughly 160 rounds per 1lbs container of 4895. 7000 grains per container averaged 44 grains per load. my family has created a saying on my behalf. apparently if you buy an abundance of ammo you are "kalvining it" lol
My purchase aside i have a few questions. How many times do you reload your brass? what is a good rule of thumb when it comes to trimming brass? My Sierra Manuel says "trim to length" 2.005. Should I do this every time And should I do it before or after resizing? What's the ideal bullet depth seating?

Also on average how much is your cost per round average? I realize that you powder and bullet choice is a huge factor but I'm basically trying to find out if you are saving money reloading posed to just buying factory ammo.

Holy essay !!! LOL !!! Ok...I'm going to do this in point form :) I don't reload 308, but I do a lot of 300 win mag, so I'll go with that.

Brass - I typically get 13ish firings out of a piece of brass. I have had case heads break off and leave the body of the case in the chamber though. I have a tool that pulls them out of there quite nicely, so I usually take it to the bitter end with a piece of brass.

Powder - I like IMR7828SSC and I think the last time I bought it, it was going for $33.95/lb

Reloading cost - It cost me (todays prices) about $0.85 / round to reload, and the cheapest factory ammo I know of now is going for $1.50 / round at Walmart.....reloaded stuff is more accurate by a long shot once you get a load worked up

Biggest advantage - What I want is always in stock (in my reloading room) and the ammo store never closes. :)

happykal
03-27-2013, 09:48 AM
After trying to calculate my cost I come up with these figures. If I reload store bought brass 3 times I pay .20cent per round just for the brass. Store bought .308 federal vitalshok nosler ballistic tip and Sierra game king cost 1.74/round
Where as if I reload with CCI 200, imr 4895, nosler ballistic tip I'm looking at .91 per round. Do the same components but with a Sierra game king 165 instead and it's 0.95/round
But you buy a box of Barnes vor-tx 165 grain tipped triple shock and it's 1.50/round.
Reloaded with the same components mentioned before but with a 165 Barnes tipped triple shock and I'm looking at 1.48/round.

Take into consideration all loads were calculated at .44 grains of powder per round. Nothing is set in stone this is all average cost. All factory ammo price were copied off cabelas Canada.
Aside from the Barnes I save. The advantage is I get to fine tune my own loads and I'm not on back order for factory ammo. But it all boils down to how much is your time worth to you. I know myself I don't shoot much in winter so I plan to reload.

happykal
03-27-2013, 09:53 AM
Brass - I typically get 13ish firings out of a piece of brass.

Reloading cost - It cost me (todays prices) about $0.85 / round to reload, and the cheapest factory ammo I know of now is going for $1.50 / round at Walmart.....reloaded stuff is more accurate by a long shot once you get a load worked up

Biggest advantage - What I want is always in stock (in my reloading room) and the ammo store never closes. :)

13 firings. I thought 3 was max lol is your ammo store open to public and have you considered reloading .308

Rory McCanuck
03-27-2013, 11:27 AM
i went to my local gun shop and ordered more reloading components. 100 brass, 2 containers of imr 4895. 2 containers of h4895. 100 sierra 165 sbt game king, 50 barnes tipped tsx 165grain and a box of 1000 cci 200 primers. I didnt get the total cost from him yet. he has to see what he can get in right now, but i used cabelas prices as a reference....
Woah there, hang on a sec.

You certainly should be able to find a winning load with those components.
Buy one pound of a powder to start with. Guns can be fickle creatures, and may not like a particular powder. While you can't swap data for the two, IMR4895 and H-4895 are pretty much the same thing. If your rifle doesn't like 4895, now you're stuck with 3 1/2 pounds of a powder that is of no use to you.
If you must get 4 lbs, get one of 4895, 4064, Varget, and BL-C(2), or something like that. Experiment to find what works, then stock up on what you know works. Different bullets will quite often like different powders, its nice to have options.
Also, put the Barnes on the back of the shelf for a bit. You are learning, use inexpensive bullets to start. Drivers Instructors don't usually use a Cadillac, learning to reload with bullets that are more than a buck apiece doesn't make sense to me. Once you have an idea what will and won't work in your rifle, then you can start playing with the Barnes.



My purchase aside i have a few questions. How many times do you reload your brass? what is a good rule of thumb when it comes to trimming brass? My Sierra Manuel says "trim to length" 2.005. Should I do this every time And should I do it before or after resizing? What's the ideal bullet depth seating?
With your new brass, size, trim, champher and beburr everything first, then everything is starting at a uniform size and condition.
Size your brass, this is where the stretching occurs. Then measure it. If it is less than 2.015" then it doesn't need to be trimmed. If it more than 2.015" it needs trimming.


Also on average how much is your cost per round average? I realize that you powder and bullet choice is a huge factor but I'm basically trying to find out if you are saving money reloading posed to just buying factory ammo.
If you shoot more than a box of 20 a year, then reloading will probably save you money per round.
You will shoot more.
You will spend more, buying things to experiment with.
Then you have to go shoot them, to see if it worked.
You will spend more, buying the latest gadget to make some task you don't enjoy easier.
Then you will to go shooting to get empty brass to reload.
It is a slippery slope into a bottmless pit.
Welcome to the club ;D

happykal
03-27-2013, 11:55 AM
Woah there, hang on a sec.

Buy one pound of a powder to start with. Guns can be fickle creatures, and may not like a particular powder. While you can't swap data for the two, IMR4895 and H-4895 are pretty much the same thing. If your rifle doesn't like 4895, now you're stuck with 3 1/2 pounds of a powder that is of no use to you.
If you must get 4 lbs, get one of 4895, 4064, Varget, and BL-C(2), or something like that. Experiment to find what works, then stock up on what you know works. Different bullets will quite often like different powders, its nice to have options.
Also, put the Barnes on the back of the shelf for a bit. You are learning, use inexpensive bullets to start. Drivers Instructors don't usually use a Cadillac, learning to reload with bullets that are more than a buck apiece doesn't make sense to me. Once you have an idea what will and won't work in your rifle, then you can start playing with the Barnes.


With your new brass, size, trim, champher and beburr everything first, then everything is starting at a uniform size and condition.
Size your brass, this is where the stretching occurs. Then measure it. If it is less than 2.015" then it doesn't need to be trimmed. If it more than 2.015" it needs trimming.

If you shoot more than a box of 20 a year, then reloading will probably save you money per round.
You will shoot more.
You will spend more, buying things to experiment with.
Then you have to go shoot them, to see if it worked.
You will spend more, buying the latest gadget to make some task you don't enjoy easier.
Then you will to go shooting to get empty brass to reload.
It is a slippery slope into a bottmless pit.
Welcome to the club ;D

You make a good point. Several good points actuAlly. I ordered imr and hodgedon because one is flaked and the other is cylindrical. So I wanted to try the variations. I never thought of my rifle not liking it.....But I can always reload for my fathers .308 lever Winchester. If not I have a 2 . 303s I can load for. There's also the family 3030. I have an aia m10 a1 7.62x39 russian. I only use good ammo in. of course id have to buy difference brass, bullets, dies and AHHHH YOU'RE RIGHT!!!! It is a bottom less pit.

Yeah I've been told the consensus on reloading is "you do save more you just shoot more"


About the brass. You don't trim unless your over maximum length? I thought you had to trim to 2.005. I thinks the max length is 2.015. Correct me if I'm wrong

JustBen
03-27-2013, 12:18 PM
First, what rifle are you reloading for? This will undoubtedly affect your brass life. A semi-auto or a lever often has a more generous chamber, and brass life will be shorter than a bolt action.

I've been reloading quite a bit for my M14 in 308, and I'm getting 3 firings per round before I'm not comfortable shooting them any more. You could probably get more out of them, but I've been using a small base resizing die for ultimate reliability, and I'm not keen on case head separations.

Brass: Winchester for the most part, but some Federal, Remington, and Lake City. Lake City is nice (and cheap at $0.19 each), but I don't have my own swager for the crimped primer pockets. I borrowed a friends and did a batch.

Powder: Varget - I can't remember the actual load though. Its 41.7, 42.7, or 43.7. It's just on the verge of being a compressed load. ($0.21/round)

Bullet: Hornady A-Max, 155 grain ($0.36/round)

Primer: Winchester ($0.03/round)

So, I'm running about $0.79/round including the cost of brass. If you stretch the life of the brass to 3 firings, it works out to $0.66/round. If I went to a cheaper bullet, I could probably save another $0.10/round.

I'm getting about 1.5 MOA accuracy out of my M14 with iron sights, which makes me happy. If I scoped it, I'm sure I could do a little bit better.

JustBen
03-27-2013, 12:21 PM
About the brass. You don't trim unless your over maximum length? I thought you had to trim to 2.005. I thinks the max length is 2.015. Correct me if I'm wrong

i measure a representative sample of my brass for the batch (say 15%), and if the average plus one standard deviation is more than 2.015, I trim the batch to 2.005. If you only trim to max length, you'll be trimming the next time around anyways.

happykal
03-27-2013, 12:24 PM
First, what rifle are you reloading for? This will undoubtedly affect your brass life. A semi-auto or a lever often has a more generous chamber, and brass life will be shorter than a bolt action.

I've been reloading quite a bit for my M14 in 308, and I'm getting 3 firings per round before I'm not comfortable shooting them any more. You could probably get more out of them, but I've been using a small base resizing die for ultimate reliability, and I'm not keen on case head separations.

Brass: Winchester for the most part, but some Federal, Remington, and Lake City. Lake City is nice (and cheap at $0.19 each), but I don't have my own swager for the crimped primer pockets. I borrowed a friends and did a batch.

Powder: Varget - I can't remember the actual load though. Its 41.7, 42.7, or 43.7. It's just on the verge of being a compressed load. ($0.21/round)

Bullet: Hornady A-Max, 155 grain ($0.36/round)

Primer: Winchester ($0.03/round)

So, I'm running about $0.79/round including the cost of brass. If you stretch the life of the brass to 3 firings, it works out to $0.66/round. If I went to a cheaper bullet, I could probably save another $0.10/round.

I'm getting about 1.5 MOA accuracy out of my M14 with iron sights, which makes me happy. If I scoped it, I'm sure I could do a little bit better.
The load is for a browning blr 81. I might try varget. I should see if I can change my order.

happykal
03-27-2013, 12:35 PM
i measure a representative sample of my brass for the batch (say 15%), and if the average plus one standard deviation is more than 2.015, I trim the batch to 2.005. If you only trim to max length, you'll be trimming the next time around anyways.

Ohhh, ok that makes sense. Do you see a difference in accuracy in the trim to length 2.005 apposed to the once fired or factory brass varying from 2.006 to 2.01?

JustBen
03-27-2013, 12:42 PM
Ohhh, ok that makes sense. Do you see a difference in accuracy in the trim to length vs brass varying from 2.006 to 2.01?

I see zero difference in accuracy.

happykal
03-27-2013, 12:53 PM
I see zero difference in accuracy.

Thank you very much for the prompt answer. You have saved me some work.

JustBen
03-27-2013, 02:10 PM
Thank you very much for the prompt answer. You have saved me some work.

No problem. Keep in mind that this may not be the case for your rifle, especially if you have more of a "precision" rifle than an M14 with a few USGI parts.

blacksmithden
03-27-2013, 02:24 PM
13 firings. I thought 3 was max lol is your ammo store open to public and have you considered reloading .308

I could make the ammo store open to the public, but I don't think you'd like my "Custom made at 3am just for you" ammo prices. :) LOL.

Yes, I am actually getting that many firings out of my 300 win mag brass in my Stevens. Now, I set up the head space in that thing so that you can JUST feel a bit of resistance when closing the bolt, so she's set up really tight. I only neck size until the cases start to tighten up in the chamber, after about 7 firings...then I anneal the necks and full length resize the cases. Then, either things will start to tighten up again in the chamber, at which point, after they've gone that far...garbage....or, I'll get a split neck, in which case...same as before...garbage. I honestly haven't tracked the number of firings I get out of my semi-auto Browning. That is my hunting baby, and she shoots really well. I don't really take it out to the range much just to shoot it. I plan on having that gun for a good long time, and I don't want things wearing out on it. :)

As for reloading 308....I'll start doing it in a second if I ever buy a gun that shoots it. :)

Rory McCanuck
03-27-2013, 07:49 PM
You make a good point. Several good points actuAlly. I ordered imr and hodgedon because one is flaked and the other is cylindrical. So I wanted to try the variations. I never thought of my rifle not liking it.....But I can always reload for my fathers .308 lever Winchester. If not I have a 2 . 303s I can load for. There's also the family 3030. I have an aia m10 a1 7.62x39 russian. I only use good ammo in. of course id have to buy difference brass, bullets, dies and AHHHH YOU'RE RIGHT!!!! It is a bottom less pit.

Yeah I've been told the consensus on reloading is "you do save more you just shoot more"


About the brass. You don't trim unless your over maximum length? I thought you had to trim to 2.005. I thinks the max length is 2.015. Correct me if I'm wrong
With all those to feed, you're sure to find something that likes it. I didn't mean to discourage you, as 4895 is really a kind of Swiss Army knife type of powder. It'll work in just about everything, may not be ideal, but it'll work.

happykal
03-27-2013, 08:56 PM
With all those to feed, you're sure to find something that likes it. I didn't mean to discourage you, as 4895 is really a kind of Swiss Army knife type of powder. It'll work in just about everything, may not be ideal, but it'll work.
No discouragement here my friend. Just borderline insanity. Do that same thing over and over and expect slightly different results. Lol I choose the 4895 just for that reason seemed like it could be used in anything.