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Asphalt Cowboy
03-31-2013, 01:26 PM
Easter breakfast scramble
fresh eggs, spinach from the garden
sausage
potatoes
onions
peppers
and salsa

pretty much out done myself again , happy easter

http://i237.photobucket.com/albums/ff309/H2SNOW1/DSCN0511_zpse7d7057b.jpg

jwirecom109
03-31-2013, 01:37 PM
Looks good

Asphalt Cowboy
03-31-2013, 02:07 PM
Looks good

was :slap:

blacksmithden
03-31-2013, 03:22 PM
My wife and kids are off visiting her dad in Ontario. I did the bachelors Easter breakfast. 1lb bacon + coffee :)

Edenchef
03-31-2013, 04:46 PM
Omygrd, You forgot the cheese, mon!!! Just kidding! Great stuff!

Asphalt Cowboy
03-31-2013, 05:44 PM
Omygrd, You forgot the cheese, mon!!! Just kidding! Great stuff!

was fresh out of tex mex otherwise it would gone on top .. :)

1pound of bacon OMG hows the heart burn

road kill
04-01-2013, 05:32 AM
Looks good, though i do have to ask where else would the spinach come from if not the garden. The attic perhaps.:tounge:

Asphalt Cowboy
04-01-2013, 11:47 AM
Looks good, though i do have to ask where else would the spinach come from if not the garden. The attic perhaps.:tounge:

we blanch the spinach and then freeze it ..

Forbes/Hutton
04-01-2013, 12:09 PM
Bubble and squeak is a traditional English dish made with the shallow-fried leftover vegetables from a roast dinner. The main ingredients are potato and cabbage, but carrots, peas, Brussels sprouts, or any other leftover vegetables can be added. The chopped vegetables (and cold chopped meat if used) are fried in a pan together with mashed potatoes or crushed roast potatoes until the mixture is well-cooked and brown on the sides. The dish is so named because it makes bubbling and squeaking sounds during the cooking process.[1] It is often served with cold meat from the Sunday roast, and pickles or brown sauce, or as an accompaniment to a full English breakfast.

The meat was traditionally added to the bubble and squeak itself, although nowadays it is more commonly made without meat. The earliest known recipe was by Maria Rundell in 1806.

The name bubble and squeak is used throughout the United Kingdom, and it may also be understood in parts of some other Commonwealth countries and the United States.

Bubble and squeak was a popular dish during World War II, as it was an easy way of using leftovers during a period when most foods were subject to rationing. In more recent times, pre-prepared frozen and tinned versions have become available.

(For me, the more brussel sprouts and turnip the better. Of Course it has to be fried in bacon fat, which is eaten with the B&S).