PDA

View Full Version : Instinctive Archers?



coastal
07-31-2013, 08:32 AM
So last winter I picked up my first bow, a Martin takedown recurve. My goal for this bow was to learn the basics of archery with no gizmos, no accessories, just learn the skills people have used for thousands of years. It's freaking hard!

Anyone have any tips for being more consistent? I tried gap shooting for a while, it went ok, but instinctive is pretty cool (when it works) lol

http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc202/Poopy62/Cgosms_2013-05-0308-01-08_zps587415e0.jpg (http://s212.photobucket.com/user/Poopy62/media/Cgosms_2013-05-0308-01-08_zps587415e0.jpg.html)

Tired of losing arrows...I made a target stand...ready for straw bales.

http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc202/Poopy62/IMG_20130712_164024_zpsbf142291.jpg (http://s212.photobucket.com/user/Poopy62/media/IMG_20130712_164024_zpsbf142291.jpg.html)

Got some tips for the coming Squirrelpocalypse this fall.

http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc202/Poopy62/IMG_20130715_183049_zps8dc29fb1.jpg (http://s212.photobucket.com/user/Poopy62/media/IMG_20130715_183049_zps8dc29fb1.jpg.html)

Candychikita
07-31-2013, 10:00 AM
your target stand looks fantastic!

are you anchoring in the same place every time? following through when you release? maybe video yourself and critique your form? i was told once upon a time that if you "look good, you shoot good" in terms of form and instinctive archery...that was the only advice i ever got about how to have some consistency with a recurve heh.

good luck :D have fun :D

coastal
07-31-2013, 10:46 AM
Ya the target stand was fun, all recycled materials, the main frame is laminate pallets from India, old rusty tin from my shop roof and some old split rail fence that was lying around. ;)

Yes I've been trying my best to get a good anchor, but I know the follow through with release is not consistent. Good call on the video....I love archery, it's like golf, but way less nerdy, and you can kill things if you want. :P

Rory McCanuck
07-31-2013, 02:57 PM
It might seem silly, but try drawing your bow with your eyes closed.
We get so much information from our eyes that it tends to overload all the "feel" and our brain wants us to go with what it sees.
Concentrate on how it feels, and get it exactly the same every time.
Get the thumb knuckle hooked on the same spot of your jaw bone every time.
Get your shoulders comfortably set the same way every time.
Straighten up and get that twinged out of the lower back.
Get your bow holding elbow locked the same every time.
Loosen your grip on the bow; you're pulling it into the crook of your thumb, it's not going anywhere and doesn't need the grip of death.

Once you can get consistent posture/ mechanics, open your eyes and look at the target.
Line the arrow tip up with a point, and shoot three arrows with that point of aim.
If you get a group, then shift your point of aim to hit centre.

My first two bows didn't have sights, and I used to shoot gophers with them.
Of course, that was 30 years ago, but the muscle memory is still kinda there.
Pretty hard to describe over the internet though :red:

ETA:
Pretty sweet bow, btw!
I really like your backstop, too.
I found hitting hard targets and driving the tip into arrows shafts and ruining them to be very good incentive to improve my aim ;D

coastal
08-01-2013, 10:22 PM
It might seem silly, but try drawing your bow with your eyes closed.
We get so much information from our eyes that it tends to overload all the "feel" and our brain wants us to go with what it sees.
Concentrate on how it feels, and get it exactly the same every time.
Get the thumb knuckle hooked on the same spot of your jaw bone every time.
Get your shoulders comfortably set the same way every time.
Straighten up and get that twinged out of the lower back.
Get your bow holding elbow locked the same every time.
Loosen your grip on the bow; you're pulling it into the crook of your thumb, it's not going anywhere and doesn't need the grip of death.

Once you can get consistent posture/ mechanics, open your eyes and look at the target.
Line the arrow tip up with a point, and shoot three arrows with that point of aim.
If you get a group, then shift your point of aim to hit centre.

My first two bows didn't have sights, and I used to shoot gophers with them.
Of course, that was 30 years ago, but the muscle memory is still kinda there.
Pretty hard to describe over the internet though :red:

ETA:
Pretty sweet bow, btw!
I really like your backstop, too.
I found hitting hard targets and driving the tip into arrows shafts and ruining them to be very good incentive to improve my aim ;D

I love that idea, I will try it tomorrow, I've worked on being consistent for the last couple days and have seen a dramatic improvement.

Today I thought I would bring some IPSC to archery.....


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cKWjxLMKrPU

BrotherRockeye
08-03-2013, 05:48 PM
I started a tutorial for you...same as I used for my son...but my fingers started smoking long before I said much so I gave up...

short story...push, pull, draw, aim, release should all be one fluid motion...there is no "anchor" point in traditional archery...if you stop and hold...watch a few old westerns, pay attention to the ...first nations folks...point the arrow like yer finger...or point your riser index finger to start...worked for my boy...

sinawalli
08-10-2013, 04:20 PM
G. Fred Asbell's book Instinctive Shooting is very good!

Steveo9mm
05-06-2014, 06:30 PM
Ive been instinctive shooting all my life. I taught myself and have a very screwy way of doing it. I have to shoot with both eyes open.

Foxer
05-06-2014, 07:17 PM
Consistency of stance is critical. If you hold the bow, draw the bow and release the same way every time the arrow will do pretty much the same thing every time and your body will naturally adjust to hit what you're looking at.

Not everyone does it this way - but I always focus on the point of impact and let my body do the rest. Kind of like shotgunning.

coastal
05-06-2014, 07:32 PM
Ya since then, I have been shooting with both eyes open and looking only at the target, getting a lot better!

Steveo9mm
05-06-2014, 08:32 PM
Consistency of stance is critical. If you hold the bow, draw the bow and release the same way every time the arrow will do pretty much the same thing every time and your body will naturally adjust to hit what you're looking at.

Not everyone does it this way - but I always focus on the point of impact and let my body do the rest. Kind of like shotgunning.

Yes stance. I agree. There is only one way i can stand to make any shots effective

Foxer
05-06-2014, 11:10 PM
Yes stance. I agree. There is only one way i can stand to make any shots effective

The stance where you're directly in front of the target with a hammer? Yeah, i tried that but apperently at formal archery meets there's some sort of 'rule' against it. :)

Whatever stance works, as long as you can repeat it constantly.

NorOntScout
07-10-2014, 11:37 AM
No one seems to have mentioned string release in all this. Part of the general form. If you are not using a release, practice how your release the string. You relax your hand and let the string pull your fingers open.

A technique I was shown a longtime ago to work it out correctly is to take a bucket of water (works best if the handle is a rope type or a steel wire without the the plastic sleeve) and fill it half full, Relax your fingers. Did you get wet ? Then you did not relax your fingers. The idea is that if you jerk your hand open, it causes the bucket to jostle and not land squarely on the ground, causing the splash back. Also helps if the ground under your bucket and your feet are level.

The reason I mention is it helped me a great deal with instinctive shooting. improved my target circle size.

3MTA3
07-11-2014, 08:11 PM
C onsistent anchor, both eyes open. and focused on a spot on the target. drawing with the shoulder muscle,Tab helps for a clean release, but a glove seems to work better for a middle finger anchor. Stance becomes a lesser concern and is one of the advantages for instinctive shooting, (consistent draw is more important and difficult to achieve for steep incline shots downward). Asbel's books are pretty good. Watch Howard Hill to see some amazing shooting.

Paladin
07-11-2014, 08:36 PM
Personally I prefer compound bows with peep sights, but the most helpful advice I've heard WRT traditional archery, after consistency of form and follow through, which have already been mentioned, is to keep your focus on the target and where you want the arrow to go. It's like throwing a baseball or a frisbee. There's no sights on a baseball, nothing to index off of, but a practiced player can put that ball right where they want it. Your brain can do all the calculations it needs to to put that arrow where you want it, it just needs to learn how, just like it had to learn how to throw a baseball. Practice is the only way to develop the skill.

It's also probably not a bad idea to find an archery range where some more experienced archer's shoot, (I see you're in Abby, I've been to Semiahmoo Fish and Game Club (http://www.sfgc.ca/#!archery/c3c1) a couple times and can recommend it) and have them critique your form. They'll be able to spot any major issues before they become "training scars".

3MTA3
07-12-2014, 04:18 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zo8UZneuggE&list=PLoZRt_msjni4m_EYf-sw8MZ_3PyMnzWks&index=1
Howard Hill

jack of all trades
07-13-2014, 06:36 PM
in my opinion, the first shot is your only true instinctive shot. after that your learning to aim. in one way or another your using reference points to know where your arrow is going to hit consistently. anchoring your string hand is extremely important. and so is anchoring your bow hand. stance, when you learning is important, but in any given hunting situation, your not likely to be able to get the stance that you normally practice with. so practice in many different positions, even kneeling, sitting, crouched, etc. practice a lot. and i mean a lot. i shoot 2000-3000 shots a month. but i don't set out to shoot say, 10 arrows a day or 100 a day. i shoot half hour here, 45min there, even 2 hrs if i can. i only shoot 3 arrows per end on targets. helps keep my concentration that way. and i try to hit the woods for stumping as much as possible. so many distances and shot angles. millions of possible targets out there. many books out there to help along the way, G. Fred Asbels' "instinctive shooting", Byron Fergusons' "become the arrow", my 8yr old son is currently reading that one. has helped him immensely. he gets comments on his form from guys who been shooting for years, he has been shooting since 5 so.....

another thing i teach people when introducing them to barebow archery, "properly tuned arrows". regardless of practice and form issues, if you don't have good spined arrows, you won't be consistent. i'm a professional bowyer and arrowsmith and i can tell you, the high end, high priced, absolute best bow in the world won't shoot a poorly tuned arrow worth crap. but, a maple sapling bent in an arc with a crude string, shooting a properly tuned arrow, will hit the mark every shot. just my couple cents.

jack of all trades
07-13-2014, 06:40 PM
oh, and one last piece of advice, whether your at the 3d range, in the woods, or in your backyard, have fun and enjoy shooting.

Foxer
07-13-2014, 10:23 PM
oh, and one last piece of advice, whether your at the 3d range, in the woods, or in your backyard, have fun and enjoy shooting.

That's pretty good advice :)

coastal
07-13-2014, 11:28 PM
Good stuff! .

Thor762
08-27-2014, 11:23 PM
Check out Jeff Kavanagh's youtube videos on release technique. They are excellent. And he does some amazing shooting himself.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-RlMR_ga7w

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GYf6JSYb0gU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RMDOQNGJSK8