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View Full Version : When does an "Antique" become "restricted"?



Edenchef
09-09-2013, 10:57 PM
I have a couple cap'n'ball antique (pre.1898) revolvers (non-firearms); if I replace the original c'n'b cylinder with a modern one that converts it to "cowboy cartridges" does it now become a restricted firearm? If I replace the original (?) percussion nipples (damaged and worn) with new ones; does that now make them "firearms"? :smash: Comments?

Cheers!

blacksmithden
09-09-2013, 11:50 PM
It shouldn't. The receiver is the firearm according to Canadian law. As long as it was built before 1898 and is not registered at a restricted firearm, you should be fine.

Edenchef
09-10-2013, 12:07 AM
Thanks, BSD! Essentially, you are saying that the part that has the handle and trigger is considered the "receiver" and as long as that part meets the "antique" definition I should be ok? Thanks again.

Cheers!

killer kane
09-10-2013, 06:56 AM
Yup, my 1878 SAA is an antique and it's in .44 Special.

BrotherRockeye
09-10-2013, 09:10 AM
yup...barrels,springs,cylinders etc are just accoutrements, the frame is the big deal.
ex: Like kk's saa my 1858 (C1861) Remington new model army .44 percussion was still antique with a Kirst conversion cylinder and plate.

tigrr
09-10-2013, 02:17 PM
I have a couple cap'n'ball antique (pre.1898) revolvers (non-firearms); if I replace the original c'n'b cylinder with a modern one that converts it to "cowboy cartridges" does it now become a restricted firearm? If I replace the original (?) percussion nipples (damaged and worn) with new ones; does that now make them "firearms"? :smash: Comments?

Cheers!

When the liberals get in power!!

awndray
09-10-2013, 02:24 PM
It's a shame that this doesn't apply to our modern shogun and rifles. The barrels do indeed make a difference.

killer kane
09-10-2013, 07:59 PM
How so?

awndray
09-10-2013, 08:11 PM
Cut the barrel of your favorite semi centre-fire semi down and BAM!

According to the Criminal Code (http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/C-46/index.html), a restricted firearm is:

a handgun that is not a prohibited firearm,
a firearm that

is not a prohibited firearm,
has a barrel less than 470 mm in length, and
is capable of discharging centre-fire ammunition in a semi-automatic manner,


a firearm that is designed or adapted to be fired when reduced to a length of less than 660 mm by folding, telescoping or otherwise, or
a firearm of any other kind that is prescribed to be a restricted firearm

CGO
09-10-2013, 08:50 PM
Make sure not to convert it to any of these calibers:


manufactured before 1898 that can discharge only rim-fire cartridges, other than .22 Calibre Short, .22 Calibre Long or .22 Calibre Long Rifle cartridges;
manufactured before 1898 that can discharge centre-fire cartridges, other than a handgun designed or adapted to discharge .32 Short Colt, .32 Long Colt, .32 Smith and Wesson, .32 Smith and Wesson Long, .32‑20 Winchester, .38 Smith and Wesson; .38 Short Colt, .38 Long Colt, .38-40 Winchester, .44‑40 Winchester, or .45 Colt cartridges.

ReignCzech
09-10-2013, 09:57 PM
...manufactured before 1898...

^^^ it's not prior to 1898 it includes 1898 completely.

it went off of the american 1899 and U.K. 1899 laws but lowered it a full year excluding a fair number of pistols manufactured.

i own a number of pistol manufactured in the year 1898, antique status, non-firearm.

CGO
09-11-2013, 01:26 PM
^^^ it's not prior to 1898 it includes 1898 completely.

it went off of the american 1899 and U.K. 1899 laws but lowered it a full year excluding a fair number of pistols manufactured.

i own a number of pistol manufactured in the year 1898, antique status, non-firearm.

I am not arguing with you but I copy pasted that right off the RCMP page for antiques....

CGO
09-11-2013, 01:28 PM
http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/fs-fd/antique-historique-eng.htm

ReignCzech
09-11-2013, 02:50 PM
^^^ right, right, you or better yet has anyone bothered to go down to a law court and the legal library in one to get copies of the hard law in the books, you know, the ones the crown and defence lawyers use in court, alongside their dual languages of the court system? legalese and english, french as well of course.

has anyone read the wording on the RCMP site, in regards to the firearms act, and the C.C. laws?
it's not exact out of the hard law, verbatum.

funny wording on the RCMP site, right off with, "generally" anyways, sure go ahead and 'believe' what is presented, and take it verbatum if you want to, I and many others will get the hard law as reference, it is what holds up, the arguement goes to interpretation, then case reference as well, in the court service provided by the crown/canada.

BrotherRockeye
09-11-2013, 03:03 PM
CGO was trying to help by citing the regs as they appear on the RCMP website, and already stated he's not arguing.
If you know better than what appears on the RCMP website, why not help enlighten the masses with some facts?
I'd love to add a year to the eligibility requirements for antique iron.

killer kane
09-11-2013, 06:48 PM
I'll stick with what I've got, regs wise, although so far I'm well covered off age wise. but who knows what might follow me home in the future. You know Reignczech, you catch more flies with honey than vinegar.

ReignCzech
09-14-2013, 05:34 AM
^^ yeah, I see your point.
It does look confrontational at second look at it.
I was meaning against the wording and twists the RCMP regs sites state, or read as.
In comparison to the actual.

As for the 1898.
many antique handguns were contracted to be produced in the '90's and mid '90's, however, with numerous handgun frames for those contracts in '96, '97, through to '99.
some of the antiques I own are in fact fully assembled in mid to late 1898, yet the contract run was from '97.
additionally, there was lots of paperwork mishaps that verifiers cannot distiguish, in regards to numerous models.
there's the loopholes.
searching takes the time, also, the dealer or collector whom will part with them.

coldestcanuck
09-26-2013, 10:58 PM
^^^ right, right, you or better yet has anyone bothered to go down to a law court and the legal library in one to get copies of the hard law in the books, you know, the ones the crown and defence lawyers use in court, alongside their dual languages of the court system? legalese and english, french as well of course.

has anyone read the wording on the RCMP site, in regards to the firearms act, and the C.C. laws?
it's not exact out of the hard law, verbatum.

funny wording on the RCMP site, right off with, "generally" anyways, sure go ahead and 'believe' what is presented, and take it verbatum if you want to, I and many others will get the hard law as reference, it is what holds up, the arguement goes to interpretation, then case reference as well, in the court service provided by the crown/canada.


States is 1898 not 1899. Our cut-off is Dec 31 1897. As long as the receiver was manufactured before that date, it doesn't matter when it was assembled.