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  1. #11
    Owner - Tundra Supply jonanddad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prairie Dog View Post
    Same here.
    Its 7 threads under this thread in this section the name is "Wicked Edge Knife Sharpener" do you guys see it?
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  2. #12
    Ex Coelis Canuck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonanddad View Post
    Its 7 threads under this thread in this section the name is "Wicked Edge Knife Sharpener" do you guys see it?
    Yes, I found it. That is an impressive set up. Expensive too. Obviously it gets knives very sharp. If I am patient and careful, I can shave with knives sharpened on my Spyderco as well. For the price difference I think I will stay with the Spyderco for now.
    "In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes an act of rebellion."
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  3. #13
    Owner - Tundra Supply jonanddad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canuck View Post
    Yes, I found it. That is an impressive set up. Expensive too. Obviously it gets knives very sharp. If I am patient and careful, I can shave with knives sharpened on my Spyderco as well. For the price difference I think I will stay with the Spyderco for now.
    Hum... strange the link did not work but you can still see it... AH! what does it say in the URL bar at the top of your browser? http://canadiangunowners.ca or http://gunownersofcanada.ca?
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  4. #14
    R.I.P. Prairie Dog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canuck View Post
    Yes, I found it. That is an impressive set up. Expensive too. Obviously it gets knives very sharp. If I am patient and careful, I can shave with knives sharpened on my Spyderco as well. For the price difference I think I will stay with the Spyderco for now.
    Which one do you have?
    Don't blame me, I didn't vote for 'em.

    'Never trust anyone who says you can't legally own something because they don't like it'. - Me

  5. #15
    Ex Coelis Canuck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonanddad View Post
    Hum... strange the link did not work but you can still see it... AH! what does it say in the URL bar at the top of your browser? http://canadiangunowners.ca or http://gunownersofcanada.ca?
    Right now? http://www.gunownersofcanada.ca/show...g-Thread/page2
    "In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes an act of rebellion."
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  6. #16
    Ex Coelis Canuck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prairie Dog View Post
    Which one do you have?
    Took some quick pics as there is no model number that I can see. It is probably on the DVD that comes with it but I don't know where it is right now. It has two sets of triangular stones. White is the finishing stone. It also has two sets of angles. One for resetting the blade if it is really dull or has not been sharpened properly. Second angle is for maintaining the angle and sharpness. DVD is quite informative as well. I know there are others out there and some are probably better than this but for the price I have been more than happy.
    It does a pretty good job of serrated edges as well.



    Brass rods are hand guards.


    Not the best pic, sorry. It shows one of the angles you can use.

    "In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes an act of rebellion."
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  7. #17
    Senior Member OutdoorPursuitsCanada's Avatar
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    Ok here goes....

    First of all I want to say this method is based on my experience and experimentation, so it is by no means the best or only way - just the way that I have found gives great results. Also, different types of steel react differently to different sharpening mediums, so sometimes it takes a little trial and error to find out what works.

    A few points to remember - a "sharpening steel" DOES NOT sharpen a blade. Use a steel on a blade that needs the edge re-honed and you will be there all day wondering why your knife is not getting any sharper. However - use a steel on a blade that you take good care of, and keep sharp and you can get amazing results (ie - you have a well sharpened knife and you are skinning/dressing/butchering a deer, in the process your knife gets a little dull - a few strokes on the steel and presto! shaving sharp again... vs - you have a knife that hasn't been sharpened for a few deer, and camp chores, and riding around in the quad box un-sheathed, and wonder why the sharpening steel isn't doing a dang thing... - and yes I have seen this in real life) - The reasoning behind this is most steels, as they dull, tend to roll over toward the other side of the blade, a sharpening steel simple re-aligns the edge, takes out the roll, restoring the razor edge that was there all along.

    Back to my story now...

    The following method is only for your typical, bevelled cutting edges.


    For convex ground blades, the method is totally different and I will get into that later.


    I personally don't use the Gatco, Lansky, or Spyderco systems - they are great, and work very well, and I sell tons of them because of that but I prefer to use a flat stone or diamond hone. It sounds crazy but when you get experienced with sharpening knives, you will also probably find this method more enjoyable (yes, sharpening knives CAN be fun!)

    My favorite flat stone type sharpener is this one:


    It has a coarse side and a fine side, composed of a diamond grit. The holes are to capture the steel you are taking of the blade as you sharpen. You can rinse it off with water and then dry the sharpener for re-use, or even just wipe it off on your pants as you go.

    Also please note as you sharpen through this whole process - you don't need to kill the blade with pressure - on the coarse stage slightly more than the weight of the blade, ie gentle pressure is required - on the fine stage just the weight of the blade is enough.

    Taking a dull blade, I will start on the coarse side, holding the sharpening stone or hone in my left hand (I am right handed), knife in my right, starting at the base of the blade, pushing away from myself while sliding the blade along the stone to the tip of the knife. Its important to push away, against the blade, so that metallic powders are not ground into the edge you are trying to hone. Also important is (unless you are re-profiling a blade, changing the grind angle, which gets alot more complex and I won't get into), is aligning the actual ground cutting edge, flat with the stone you are using. A great way to see if you have your angle correct is take a black marker, completely colour the cutting edge you are about to sharpen, take a few strokes at the angle you believe to be right, then look at the coloured edge - if the black marker has been ground off evenly, then your angle is correct - if it is ground off just at the edge of the blade, or closer to the body of the blade, then you need to adjust your angle accordingly.

    Continue to take strokes along your stone (or diamond hone, whatever, I will just use the word stone for simplicity) - counting strokes as you go, same side over and over. For really dull blades, do about 20 or 30, for not so dull blades 10 or 15. Then take your knife, drag your fingernail perpendicular to the edge and see if you feel a burr formed on the opposite side of what you were sharpening. Yes you want to roll the edge over. If you can't feel a burr, continue to sharpen the same side you were on, stopping ever 10-15 strokes to check for the burr. Do this until you roll the edge into a burr on the opposite side, and make sure you remember your TOTAL number of stokes.

    The reasoning behind creating a burr, or rolled edge, is you are taking the steel to its absolutely finest point, beyond which it cannot get sharper - at which point it rolls to the other side of the blade.

    Once you have created a nice burr all along the blade (make sure you check it not just at one spot on the knife, but right from tip to base) - you are ready to start on the other side. Take the same number of total strokes on the new side, and don't stop until you have done them all! Now you have taken an even amount of steel off both sides. You will probably find that the steel has now rolled back the other way. Go back to the other side of the blade (the one you started on) and count strokes again (usually it only takes 10-20 this time) until you roll the edge again. Stoke it back the same on the other side... again. You are now honing that edge into a fine point while taking equal amounts of steel of as you go. By now it should only take 10 or so strokes to get that burr. My method now is, 10 stokes one side, 10 strokes the other side. Clean the stone. 9 strokes one side, 9 strokes the other side, clean the stone. And so on, 8/8, 7/7, 6/6, 5/5, 4/4, 3/3, 2/2, 1/1 - all while cleaning the stone in between each set of strokes.

    Your blade should now be very sharp - as in - easily shaves hair off your arm. If you are planning on using it for field dressing or skinning - you may want to stop here. The coarse stone creates micro-serrations in the blade, that work quite well for most tasks. If you want to hone it further, for capeing, whittling, or just cause you want to have the sharpest knife at camp - then continue.

    Flip your stone over to the fine side, or grab a fine stone. Using the process described above, go at it again on the fine side. Your initial pass most likely won't take more than 10 stokes to create a burr again. Go through the whole process right down to the final 3/3, 2/2, 1/1...

    You can now work progressively through finer and finer mediums (if you wish). Once you are done with the stones - you need to give the blade a few swipes on your sharpening steel. The blade will already be wicked sharp - but steeling it will align the entire length of the blade to a perfect straight edge. 10 or so swipes per side is good, make sure you alternate sides as you go, not 5 one side, 5 the next side.

    Now you need to strop the blade. An old leather belt works great. I have fancy leather strop tools from Lee Valley and my old leather belt works just as good. The belt needs to be somewhat rigid, so if you hold it in one hand, and step on the end - you can pull it tight and strop the blade from there. Starting at the top, with your cutting edge pointing UP, more the blade down and out, dragging the length of the blade against the leather. You do not need to push hard, just a gently swipe. MAKE SURE you are "back-blading", ie cutting edge up, stroking down (complete opposite of the motion used on the stones) - If you don't back blade on the leather you will not accomplish anything except for probably end up with two old leather belts as the now very sharp cutting edge catches the belt and cuts it in half... Strop the knife, alternating sides as you go about 25-50 times per side. This really polishes that edge, takes out any micro-serrations left from the fine stone and results in a face shaving sharp blade... usually

    As I said, lots of practice is required, don't expect to get perfect results the first time.

    If your knife is a really high grade steel (VG10, VG1, S30V, many carbon steels, etc) - to touch up the edge it will only take a few strokes on the sharpening steel and you will be good to go. For lower grade steels (AUS8, 420, 8Cr13MoV) you will probably have to go through the process again - but starting with the fine hone. If your blades get really dull, chipped or broken - you will have to start with the coarse stone, regardless of quality of steel.

    Now for convex ground blades. Watch this video - it is everything I would say, but don't need to because someone else already has! I use this method on my Fallkniven S1 hunting knife. Convex ground VG10 laminated steel. Works wonders and yes I can shave my face with that knife. Please note: in the video he is using a "back blading" technique - this is VERY important for convex ground blades. If you try to sharpen a convex ground blade with the above techniques used for bevelled edge blades, you will ruin the convex grind.



    Well I hope this helps anyone out there new to sharpening. Like I said, once you get used to it, it becomes enjoyable. You get used to what each different knife "likes" - and there is no guesswork.
    Cheers!

    Jesse

  8. #18
    Resident Combine Pilot JustBen's Avatar
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    Hmmm, maybe I should be getting rid of my pull through!

  9. #19
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    Another vote for the Spyderco sharpmaker. I added a set of ultra fine rods from Jay at worriors and wonders, first time I have been able to shave hair. I'm all thumbs, so if I can do it anybody can.

  10. #20
    Owner - Tundra Supply jonanddad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustBen View Post
    Hmmm, maybe I should be getting rid of my pull through!
    If your ever in the Edmonton area I would be more than happy to show you my setup. Also if I am ever out to the Saskatoon are I will bring it with me.
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