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  1. #21
    Senior Member Waterloomike's Avatar
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    i've got 1821 with my .45 cal. flintlock, with 80 grns, weighed and measured ball, on a cold day. about 25 f. sunny and cloudless.


    Allow our Rightful Liberty or .....

  2. #22
    Super Moderator Rory McCanuck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mobusten View Post
    Does it bob up and down and take time to settle before it can be read?
    Some are better than others.
    My Redding uses a paddle that sits in a pool of oil.
    As the beam swings, it moves the paddle through the puddle, and the resistance slows the beam.
    Thicker oil slows it faster.
    I just stop it near zero with a finger, small swings cancel out quick enough.

    The 5-10 is the absolute best I've seen for dampening.
    Drop a weight on, swings all the way to the top, halfway to the bottom, then stops dead on zero.
    The first few times I had to check that there wasn't something hitting it!

    The new-to-me Powder Pro digital reads pretty quickly too.
    Don't blame me, I didn't vote for that clown. Oct 20, '15

  3. #23
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    That sounds a bit quick. My 308 load 43.5 gr varget pushing a 178 amax to 2618 fps average (45 shots) at 780ft and -2 c. This was with a labradar doppler radar chronograph. The rifle is 1 in 11.25" 24".

    I would set your chronograph up with a level to make it sit square. From my limited understanding of light source chronographs, is if the unit is not perfectly in line the readings will be off by lots. Perfect example was, at my range guy had his chronograph reading 2850 tried it against mine only 2650. His unit looked crooked and was sitting sideways (no solid base).
    Last edited by Sandhu; 01-06-2016 at 04:09 PM. Reason: wrong bullet model

  4. #24
    Senior Member 3MTA3's Avatar
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    That sounds like a defective unit?
    The Chrony reads velocity in feet-per-second (or metres-per-second) and works in a velocity range from 30 fps to 7000 fps (10 mps to 2134 mps). Operating Temperature range: 32o Fahrenheit to 110 o Fahrenheit (0 o Celsius to 43 o Celsius), non-condensing. (Ambient temperature must be above dew-point temperature and not fall below dew-point temperature while Chrony is being used.) Storage Temperature range: 14o Fahrenheit to 120o Fahrenheit (-10o Celsius to 50o Celsius) non-condensing. (Ambient temperature must be above dew-point temperature and not fall below dew-point temperature where the Chrony is being stored, unless the Chrony is sealed in an air-tight container.)

    Accuracy: 99.5% or better. Displayed velocity will not differ from actual velocity by more than 1 part in 200, i.e., 10 fps on a velocity reading of 2000 fps. Typical performance is generally better, and shot-to-shot repeatability is always more accurate, i.e., Reported Mean Instrumental Velocity may differ by as much as 0.5% from actual mean instrumental velocity, but Standard Deviation calculated from data gathered with a Chrony will always be closer than 0.5% to actual Standard Deviation for a string. This is an important fact because an accurate measurement of a load’s uniformity is of considerably more importance than is an exact measure of its average velocity.
    I would think the unit would have to be pretty tilted to make a big difference as long as it is roughly level-It is important to be far enough away from the muzzle

    he projectile must pass between 6 and 4 inches (15 and 10 cm) directly OVER the Twin Lenses in the black plastic boxes at the front and back of the chronograph. These are the chronograph’s "eyes". Attaching pieces of dark-coloured tape on the guide rods (wire rods) at these heights, will help you to accurately aim your shots.
    Chronographs should be at least 10 feet (3 m) from the muzzle of a high-powered rifle, but can be closer to guns with a lesser blast. Five feet (1.5 m) is about right for .22 rimfire firearms. Shotguns should be fired at 5 feet because of the spreading pattern of the shot and errant wads. Arrows must be clear of the bowstring before passing over the first "eye".
    "So much of left-wing thought is a kind of playing with fire by people who don't even know that fire is hot.." - George Orwell
    "Necessity is the plea for every infringement of human freedom. It is the argument of tyrants; it is the creed of slaves."-William Pitt the younger
    FTrudeau

  5. #25
    Senior Member Mobusten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sandhu View Post
    That sounds a bit quick. My 308 load 43.5 gr varget pushing a 178 amax to 2618 fps average (45 shots) at 780ft and -2 c. This was with a labradar doppler radar chronograph. The rifle is 1 in 11.25" 24".

    I would set your chronograph up with a level to make it sit square. From my limited understanding of light source chronographs, is if the unit is not perfectly in line the readings will be off by lots. Perfect example was, at my range guy had his chronograph reading 2850 tried it against mine only 2650. His unit looked crooked and was sitting sideways (no solid base).
    I used a tripod with a level built into the head. So I don't think that's it.

  6. #26
    Go Canucks Go! lone-wolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kennymo View Post
    Too complicated for lone wolf....take it easy on him, he's an electrician.
    Blah, my chargemaster has a power cord, proper thing - this is 2016(almost put a 5 there), not the 1800s! I want convenience, I tell my fancy dispenser to spit out 25gr, while I drink coffee. My coffee drinking efficiency has gone way up as a result.
    the wild still lingered in him and the wolf in him merely slept

    "It must be poor life that achieves freedom from fear" - Aldo Leopold

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    kennymo (01-06-2016)

  8. #27
    Senior Member Grey_Wolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rory McCanuck View Post
    Great advice above, and it sure looks like you're on the right track.

    The Hornady test gun was a Winchester 70 with a 22" barrel and a 1:12 twist.
    Even a different Win 70 with a 22" barrel will give different numbers, so don't get too wrapped up in what the book says.

    Using new brass also introduces a variable; unless they were all completely full length sized prior to loading, there will be some variation in the dimensions. That's one of the nice things about neck sizing, all the exterior dimensions of the brass are 'almost' the same.

    To be honest, I'd blame the scale more than anything else.
    I have experimented with that little Hornady scale, and my verdict is that they're ***king dangerous.
    Set a weight on it, and watch it get heavier. Weigh something, and record the weight; re-weigh it, and get a weight 0.7gr different.

    BrotherRockeye has a really nice beam scale for sale, although the ad reads please delete.
    http://www.gunownersofcanada.ca/show...for-sale-trade
    Might be worthwhile giving him a pm to see if it's still available.

    Any beam scale, including the Lee, is going to be more accurate than that cheap digital.
    I have, or have had, a Lee, Redding oil damened, Bonanza, Bair(same as BR's Hornady), RCBS 5-10 and an RCBS Powder Pro digital. They've all been within 0.1gr of each other, and after a good cleaning, they all agree. My little Hornady digital often doesn't.
    If you like the digitals, spend some real money to get a good one, $150 and up.

    And after all that, I've had groups where the extreme spread has been 5fps, but look at the paper and it's a 4" group.
    Then you get a group with a spread of 75 fps, and it's under an inch. And repeatedly shoots well
    Reloading is a great way to drive yourself around the bend and develop OCD.
    There, fixed it for ya

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    Rory McCanuck (01-06-2016)

  10. #28
    Senior Member Grey_Wolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mobusten View Post
    I've never actually used a beam scale. They pretty easy to use? I'll have to look into them when I decide to upgrade.

    Edit: lone-wolf answered that one for me right there. So they're complicated?
    They aren't complicated at all. I read further down the explanation and it should clear that up. The one thing I found about the beam scales is don't move it at all after you have set it. It will change the way it reads and you have to re-zero it. I have the RCBS and it has three tabs for adjusting the weight but basically the same. They work good but I sure do like my ChargeMaster for loading lots of the same load. Load development isn't so bad as you are only loading three of a charge weight at a time but once you have you're load and want to throw a hundred or so - the ChargeMaster really shines. I do check the odd load with the beam as a check

  11. #29
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    Something ain't quite right. 42.5 is .5 above minimum. Your velocities should be a bit more than 2520ish. 2700 FPS loads are max loads with a 24" barrel. Check everything.

  12. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mobusten View Post
    I used a tripod with a level built into the head. So I don't think that's it.
    Have you checked the level? Did you level both x and y?

    You obviously are doing something wrong to have that much error.

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