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  1. #1
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    getting into fly fishing

    I have been fishing my whole life with a bait rod, I love it. now I want to expand that to include fly fishing I never really done much of it. so i am looking for advice on what i should go out and buy for my first season of it. quality rod/reel that wont break the bank and anything you can recommend for gear. any tips or advice are welcome as well.

  2. #2
    Go Canucks Go! lone-wolf's Avatar
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    Just remember that Flying High knows nothing about fly fishing
    the wild still lingered in him and the wolf in him merely slept

    Aptet aut mori

  3. #3
    Untouchable FlyingHigh's Avatar
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    Yeah...i dont know a thing. Ive only flyfished nearly exlusively for 15+ years and managed a fishing/hunting store for 2

    I'll make a detailes post when i get home tonight.

    In the mean time, what are your target species? Lake, rivers, ocean? Have a budget?
    I'd rather make a difference than a dollar.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Camo tung's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lone-wolf View Post
    Just remember that Flying High knows nothing about fly fishing
    He has to fly fish, can't drive in to any good mountain lakes with that Ford! lol
    "It is an absolute truism that law-abiding, armed citizens pose no threat to other law-abiding citizens."

    Ammo, camo and things that go "blammo".

  5. The Following User Liked This Post By Camo tung

    JustBen (02-03-2016)

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by FlyingHigh View Post
    Yeah...i dont know a thing. Ive only flyfished nearly exlusively for 15+ years and managed a fishing/hunting store for 2

    I'll make a detailes post when i get home tonight.

    In the mean time, what are your target species? Lake, rivers, ocean? Have a budget?
    target species mostly trout and i would like to try some salmon. mostly small rivers and ponds, and ocean in bays feeding rivers. ass for a budget i am not set on a budget. i would say a medium budget. i don't wont junk but I am also not a professional with a television show. but i do like quality gear that's reliable.

  7. #6
    Go Canucks Go! lone-wolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Camo tung View Post
    He has to fly fish, can't drive in to any good mountain lakes with that Ford! lol
    Oh the ford, I never even read the latest thread about it, just another fisherman's exaggerated tall tale I imagine. Got enough of that on this island
    the wild still lingered in him and the wolf in him merely slept

    Aptet aut mori

  8. #7
    Untouchable FlyingHigh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Camo tung View Post
    He has to fly fish, can't drive in to any good mountain lakes with that Ford! lol
    I walk in. Flying is too rich for my blood.

    Quote Originally Posted by Curt View Post
    target species mostly trout and i would like to try some salmon. mostly small rivers and ponds, and ocean in bays feeding rivers. ass for a budget i am not set on a budget. i would say a medium budget. i don't wont junk but I am also not a professional with a television show. but i do like quality gear that's reliable.
    All right, that's fairly simple. Trout and Salmon are two very different types of fish, both in habits and in size so ideally that would mean two separate set ups. However, I see you're on the east coast, so I'm guessing you're targeting Atlantic salmon which tend to be a fair bit smaller than some of our Pacific salmon species. Atlantics tend to average well under 15lbs.

    With that in mind, let's look at getting you into a primarily trout setup that can also be used on somewhat larger fish.

    The first thing you'll need is a rod. Fly rods and lines are classified by "weight". The larger the number, the heavier the rod ie, 3wt is lighter than a 4wt. You'll want a rod that is capable of handling your target species which is why I mentioned 2 set ups. I run a much heavier rod for the big chinook, chum and coho salmon we have out here. But, seeing as you're unlikely to encounter fish that large, you won't need to go as heavy.

    I would suggest a 5wt rod, 9ft long.. It's kind of a "middle of the road" rod weight. It's light enough to present smaller dry flies, delicate enough you'll still have fun playing small trout yet it has the back bone to handle the bruiser trout and small salmon. I've landed everything from 8" long cutthroat trout up to a 20lb chum salmon on mine (mind you, that was a chore and took a little skill and more than a little luck LOL ). I also recommend a 4 piece rod over a 2 piece simply for portability.

    You want to match your line to your rod, so with a 5wt rod, you'll want a 5wt line. Some people suggest going one weight heavier (6wt line, 5wt rod), but I don't recommend this for beginners. Simple reason being is you won't be able to maximize the potential until you've become an accomplished caster. Keep it simple, keep it matching for now.

    Lines come in different tapers. Weight forward, double taper, single taper etc. Don't concern yourself with these until you've gotten the hang of casting. Just buy a weight forward floating line to learn on and stick with that for now. Weight forward is the easiest to cast.

    Lines are generally 50 - 100yards long. You'll be filling up your reel about 2/3 with backing first, which is usually a dacron braid and then your line goes on. Backing's purpose is to provide extra length when a big fish heads for the other side of the lake. Buy whatever you want for backing, it's not too big a deal. I use 30lb test on everything because it's what I have.

    Leaders are attached to the end of the fly line. You can buy commercially made tapered leaders. Brand isn't too critical but I tend to use Rio. At the end of the leader is a short length of line called tippet which is of slightly lighter poundage than the leader. Any monofilament will do, but again I'm partial to Rio.

    Now you need a reel to put that line on. Match your reel to your line and rod weight as well. This will provide balance which is important in casting and ensure you have enough room for backing and line. This is a common point of contention among fly fishers and opinions are like arseholes. In fly fishing, a reel's first job is to hold the line. Secondary to that is to provide drag when fighting large fish. My thoughts on the matter are any fish over a pound or so gets played on the reel. Why? I don't like line all around my feet or in my lap. Some people simply strip the line in with smaller fish. Anyways, find what works for you but if you plan on targeting fish over say a couple pounds in the future, make sure whatever you buy has a decent drag system. There are two common types, "click and pawl" and disc. I won't get into how each works other than to say disc drags don't gum up as quickly, are a little more maintenance free and provide more power. All my reels are disc drag.

    So, there's your basic "hardware". Rod, reel and line.

    What to buy? In my opinion, it's a no brainer.

    Temple Fork Outfitters for the rod. These guys build rods which are unmatched for value. They have different series, from budget to high end. Their high end rods are as nice as the big names like Sage for about half the price. The big selling point about TFO is their warranty. If you break your rod, it doesn't matter how, and are the original owner registered with their warranty, they'll either fix it or replace it for a small fee...for life.

    All their gear is good quality as well.

    http://templeforkoutfitters.ca/broken-rod

    One very nice thing they offer is "fly fishing outfits". Rod, reel, line. backing and case as a package. I'd highly recommend taking a look at this package which comes in just over $300. It's a mid range TFO rod, the reel has a disc drag and the line is a weight forward floating.

    http://templeforkoutfitters.ca/rods/...d-outfits.html

    Other gear:

    Once you get the hang of casting your floating line, and if you start fishing deeper waters, you'll want additional lines. These are loaded on replacement spools for your reel (make sure the reel you buy has ones easily found). A full sinking line will be the next line to buy. These come in different sink rates, but the happy medium is a Type 3. Sink tip lines (front half sinking, rear half floating) are useful in certain applications but can be tricky to cast for newbies so I'd wait until you'd mastered casting.

    Little tools here and there will make your life easier. Pick up a pair of nippers that have an eye clearing pick on one end. Your nippers will be your most used tool when tying knots and that little pick will save you alot of aggravation when it comes to hook eyes clogged with head cement. The next tool to buy is a nail knot tool. I like the one by Tie-Fast, but many variations are on the market. The nail knot will used be to attach leader to line, so you'll need it regularly. Lastly, get a pair of hemostats or at least needle nosed pliers. Use them to pinch barbs on hooks and to unhook fish before release.

    There are countless resources also available on the web and many excellent books on the subjects. Youtube will be a valuable resource for learning how everything is set up and especially casting.

    Check out this play list on casting:

    As for books, the one I most recommend is called "The Gilly: A Flyfisher's Guide" by Alfred Davy. It's BC based, but the information can and is applied no matter where you fish: http://www.amazon.ca/The-Gilly-flyfi.../dp/0889256381

    Of course, I also suggest trying to find a shop in your area that has knowledgeable fly fishers working there and/or a fly fishing club in your town. Having first hand, in person knowledge is the best it gets when it comes to learning about the sport.

    Sorry if this is long winded. Fly fishing is my first love and deepest passion so I can get carried away, but I hope this helps.

    Feel free to ask any other questions.
    Last edited by FlyingHigh; 02-03-2016 at 05:48 PM.
    I'd rather make a difference than a dollar.

  9. The Following 2 Users Like This Post By FlyingHigh

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  10. #8
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    great information this is a big help in getting me started. you mad me realize how little i know about it. very interesting sport i have a feeling i'm going to have a good spring.

  11. #9
    Untouchable FlyingHigh's Avatar
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    No problem. It's a very technical sport, but it's extremely rewarding. I find that it really puts you in touch with ecosystems and how they function. Understanding basic entomology and freshwater biology gives you a whole new view of the natural world.

    I've been doing it for 15 years and I'm constantly learning. I fished with an old fella who had done it for 60+ years and he said the same thing.
    I'd rather make a difference than a dollar.

  12. #10
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    awesome i cant wait to give it a go

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