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    Senior Member Satain's Avatar
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    How to's of the M14

    How to's of the M14... A Canadian Perspective.



    Quote Originally Posted by Satain

    How to dis-assemble & re-assemble the M14

    Click Here

    How to dis-assemble your bolt with out any tools


    *Watch around the 5 minute mark*

    How to dis-assemble & re-assemble the trigger group on my M14


    Quote Originally Posted by Lazerus2000 View Post



    How to inspect your M14

    Introduction, credits, and disclaimer

    This document is primarily a course outline for one of the Canadian Gun Nutz seminars about M-14 type rifles. These seminars are designed to share information with M-14 owners, of whatever brand, so that they can competently inspect and evaluate their personal M-14 type rifle, and make sound judgments regarding safety, upgrades, and value, and also to provide them with a realistic perspective on what jobs they can do themselves, and what should be reserved for the competent M-14 experienced gunsmith.

    The following document is NOT to be taken as criticism of any manufacturer, importer, retailer, gunsmith, accessory manufacturer, or private seller of the M-14 type riflesMost of these people deserve our respect, and our money. Remember, if they don’t get both, then they won’t stay in business long enough to keep feeding our M-14 obsession.

    As with any other free advice you get, especially free advice from the internet, remember,
    “Free advice is often worth a lot less than you paid for it”,
    And of course,
    “Your personal mileage may vary.”
    Remember also that at this time, the supply of M-14 type rifles, old or new, is limited,
    and that there will be no more new Chinese or original US GI M-14 type rifles coming to market in the foreseeable future.

    Like the great Canuck philosopher HUNGRY says,
    “Don’t buy one … buy two …”
    and get them quick,
    before the supply runs out,
    and your dick falls off”.

    Inspecting your M-14
    This is an FAQ about what to look for when you get your brand new Chinese M-14 or Springfield Armory M1A or well used genuine US GI M-14. Even though a properly built M-14 in good condition can be one of the most reliable mechanical devices known to mankind, and even though the manufacturer of a new rifle, or the seller of a used rifle, always says that everything is just fine, it is always a good idea to check over any new firearm for yourself.

    NOTE: With your brand new M-14 type rifle, American OR Chinese, the inspection report included will always show that all the inspection boxes are checked off as "GOOD".
    BUT,
    even with that perfect score on the paper report, your brand new rifle just might have some serious deficiencies. Irregardless of what any supplier or manufacturer or vendor says about their “stringent quality control”, some of them are still selling NEW M-14 type rifles with;

    - barrels indexed so far off, that this is immediately obvious to any cursory inspection.
    - headspace greatly exceeding SAAMI specifications for .308 Winchester commercial ammunition, even though the firearm may be clearly marked with that caliber
    - bolts that may be bearing on only on lug
    - bolts that spit out the extractor after the first few round
    - improperly hardened or cast parts that wear or break within a few rounds

    The only reasonable conclusion we can reach is that, no matter what the glowing Quality Control checklist that comes with the rifle may say, these suppliers do NOT do even a cursory inspection before shipping you your new rifle.

    Norinco VS Springfield …a Canadian perspective
    Norinco M14 rifles are made primarily of FORGED parts, with excellent dimensional tolerances, but with some possible variations in heat treatment and assembly. In Canada, if you buy your new or used Chinese M-14 from a reputable dealer, you will probably have some type of warranty. The vendor may also have some spare parts, and a repair/maintenance service, to keep your Chinese import shooting as long as you want. With the recent explosion in popularity of the Chinese M-14 type rifle in the Canadian market s, there is a wealth of information, accessories and services available in Canada to support these fine firearms.

    If you view the Norinco [ M-305 or M-14 or M-14S ] as only a stripped FORGED receiver, with very close to US GI dimensional specifications, you can never go wrong. Think of all those extra parts that come attached to the receiver as [ mostly usable ] free bonuses. If you like a hands on, do it yourself project, get a Chinese M-14 Simply do a bit of tuning, add the requisite US GI parts, and you have one of the best rifles available, and at only 1/3 or so of the cost of an equivalent Springfield M1A.
    BUT,
    for those who don't want to get their hands dirty working on their own rifles, or who don’t want to pay for a gunsmith to do it for them, the Springfield M1A can be a very good choice. Springfield offers a lifetime warranty on the M1A. Unfortunately, this lifetime warranty may be required even on a brand new Springfield, because, in my experience [ and in many other M1A owner’s experience ] there may not be much difference in quality control between the new US and the new Chinese made versions, There have been considerable complaints that many of the M1A CAST receivers are not correct dimensionally. Aside from the CAST receiver, new Springfield M1A rifles no longer use surplus US GI internal parts, and in their place, SA has turned to more cast parts, of varying quality, from various suppliers.

    Known Springfield Armory M1A deficiencies
    Springfield Armory, Inc. M1A rifles may have some or all of the following deficiencies:

    1) The receiver scope mounting hole and mount surfaces may be out of specification, which makes fitting non-adjustable scope mounts difficult.

    2.) The receiver bridge primary (bolt closing) firing pin retracting surface can be mislocated. The camming surface of the tang on the firing pin should be inspected carefully for damage. If the firing pin tang is damaged, the firing pin should be replaced with a non-chromed firing pin. With firing pins that are not chromium plated, most of the damage will be on the firing pin instead of the receiver bridge. The harder surface of the chromium plated firing pin will cut a groove into the receiver bridge deeper and sooner .. Note that light polish wear is normal on the retracting surface but a groove cut into the receiver by the firing pin is not.

    3) The bolt may be cast, and have cast parts. These cast bolts are not top quality, and especially have a bad habit of losing the cast extractor

    4) The receiver locking lug engagement surface is slightly misaligned. Lapping the bolt to the receiver can resolve this, and is recommended to evenly distributes stress on the receiver.

    5) The bottom of the bolt roller makes contact with the receiver when the bolt is in battery, preventing the bolt from closing completely. The fix is to grind a half round relief cut into the receiver, to accept the bolt roller when fully locked in the down position. This will save replacing the bolt or bolt roller, which otherwise could be destroyed rather quickly.
    6) The receiver groove that takes the tab of the op rod may be undersize, rough, vary in size, and not cut straight. This can cause rough functioning, unreliability, quick wear on that tiny op rod tab, and op rods eventually jumping out of the track. This also can cause extra work when properly fitting a replacement GI or Chinese op rod with an unworn, full size tab.

    7.) The receiver rear sight elevation knob indexing detents wear prematurely due to too soft surface hardness. The fix is to install an elevation repair disk.

    8.) The holes for the bolt lock pin are too small. The bolt lock roll pins could be forced in which may cause one of the bolt lock window receptors to break. The simple solution is to use a slightly smaller diameter pin.

    9.) Some of the earlier Stainless Steel barreled “loaded” rifles, had the chambers cut TOO FAST = very rough = reamer chatter = poor extraction and reliability.

    10.) The rear sight pocket is slightly too short. This results in a slight over hang of the rear sight base at the rear.. This springs the rear sight cover more than it should. The front edge of the cover can be lightly filed down, which requires less force to install the rear sight cover.

    NEW Chinese M-14 rifles VS OLD Chinese M-14S or M305
    I make a distinction between the OLD Chinese M-14 rifles, Polytech and Norinco, and the NEW Chinese M-14 rifles. The OLD Chinese M-14 clones came in to Canada and the US before the US assault rifle ban. The NEW Chinese M-14 clones are all Norinco, and over the years, these have arrived in Canada in various batches … most recently Nov 2007. These NEW 14s are slightly different and potentially better than the OLD. However, Chinese quality control varies considerably amongst individual rifles. Some of the old Chinese M-14 rifles were as good as it gets right out of the box, and can give years of safe, reliable service. Unfortunately, some of the Chinese M-14 rifles, new or old, can become unsafe to fire within a few hundred rounds.

    To me, the most significant difference between the NEW and the OLD Chinese M-14 rifles is that the NEW batch of Norincos will take a “drop in” GI bolt. This was definitely NOT the case for the older Chinese M-14 rifles, Polytech and Norinco alike. On most of the old ones, the barrel hood protruded into the receiver about .010” too much, so that a GI bolt would require massive amounts of lapping in to fit up properly. So, for these Chinese M-14 type rifles, you usually needed to swap in a GI barrel, or do other major modifications when swapping in a GI bolt.

    The next important difference is that the NEW Chinese M-14 rifles all seem to have the flash hiders permanently attached. This matters primarily if you want to swap out or work on the gas assembly, and /or swap to different style flash hiders or compensators. Taking off a welded on flash hider is NOT a trivial job. Also, the NEW batch has the tiny barrel retaining screw MEGA-torqued down, then MEGA-STAKED in. Getting this screw out is again non-trivial.

    Another consideration between the NEW and the OLD Chinese M-14 rifles is that the NEW batch of Norinco's, in some cases, MAY have significantly improved quality control. I say “MAY”, because, while I have not seen any soft bolts recently, the bolts may still be fitted improperly, and may have way too much headspace. Also, on a sad new note, while I never saw a major misalignment of the barrel / receiver in the OLD models, this misalignment[ aka misindexing ] is epidemic with the NEW NORCs.



    Known Chinese Norinco / Polytech M-14 / M-14S / M-305 deficiencies
    First thing to understand about the Chinese M-14 clones, whatever manufacturer, and whenever they were made, is that Chinese quality control varies considerably amongst individual rifles.
    While the Chinese FORGED receivers are usually closer to US GI dimensional specifications than most commercial receivers, with the Chinese M-14 clones, heat treatment and quality control during assembly of the fitted parts may vary considerably.

    In my personal sampling [ several dozens ] careful inspections have found MOST [ about 2/3 ] of the Chinese M-14 rifles to be good to excellent overall, or else they could be made into great rifles with a bit of effort, and some US GI parts. I have also found a few receivers that were a bit softer than desirable, but these would still make safe and reliable shooters … they just might wear out a bit earlier. I also found one Chinese M-14 receiver that was heat treated too hard [ as in BRITTLE ]. This one was unfired, sold as a stripped receiver only, and it shattered while being fitted with a barrel. This was fortunate, as a receiver that is too hard is much more unsafe than one that is too soft, and without proper test equipment, is very difficult to detect.

    This is why it is so important that the end user has as much knowledge as possible when buying any M-14 type rifle. A careful inspection can determine if you are getting a silk purse, perfect as is, or a sow’s ear, that will require lots of money and labor to get right.

    1) Even brand new, the original Chinese bolt may be poorly fitted at the left locking lug, the bolt may be too soft, headspace may be grossly long for SAAMI .308 Winchester specifications even though the firearm is marked as .308 Winchester, headspace will almost definitely be too long for reloads using .308 Win brass, and bolt timing may be incorrect. … or all of the above.
    Most of the NEW Norinco clones I've checked recently had about .009” - .013" headspace over 7.62 NATO GO. When you consider that SAAMI .308 Win NO GO is approximately equivalent to 7.62 NATO GO, you can see that if shooting .308 Win ammo in these lengthy chambers, the SAAMI THEORETICAL safety margins are being exceeded by quite a bit. That being said, in the real world, my personal Chinese M-14, new out of the box, had .009” headspace over 7.62 NATO GO. This particular rifle also shot a sub-moa group out of the box with factory loaded .308 Win 168 Gr HPBT match ammo. Here in Canada, we have thousands of these M-14 type rifles floating around with similar or even worse headspace measurements, and have very few [ or none? ] documented cases of too long M-14 headspace causing case separations with NEW commercial .308 factory loaded ammo.

    If you want to reload for the M-14 rifles, or if you want target accuracy, or if you want that extra theoretical safety margin that tighter headspace can give you with .308 Win commercial ammo, then in most cases, the fix is relatively simple [ if a bit expensive ] … just replace the Chinese bolt with a US GI M-14 bolt. In most cases, with Chinese receivers and barrels in good condition, this takes only a few minutes of lapping in before almost perfect .308 Win GO headspace is achieved.

    2.) The barrel may be incorrectly indexed to the receiver . If the front sight leans to the left, and the rear sight is adjusted to the right to compensate, then the barrel has been over-tightened. To correct this, the barrel must be removed, and the barrel shoulder must be rolled back to remove the metal distorted by this over-tightening. Since proper alignment, torque, and fit of the barrel shoulder to the receiver is critical to accuracy, this is not a trivial fix.

    If the front sight leans to the right, and the rear sight is adjusted to the left to compensate, then the barrel is under-tightened. This is not as serious as over-tightening, as in most cases all that is required is to remove the little lock screw under the op rod at the receiver/barrel, and using the proper tools and torque specifications, tighten / rotate the barrel to the proper location. This is what is known as “INDEXING” the barrel

    3) The Chinese op rod spring is undersize in diameter, and usually will not last as long as a US GI spring. Replacement with a US GI spring, even a well used GI spring, is the very first upgrade any Chinese M-14 owner should consider. NOTE: the Chinese op rod springs are smaller in inside diameter than the US GI springs. If fitting a US GI spring sized round style op rod spring guide, the Chinese springs may bind and cause reliability issues.

    4) The hammer, trigger and sear, may be soft, and also may require a lot of fitting to get a safe trigger, with no creep, and a decent pull weight. The trigger pin and the hammer pin, as well as being soft, may also be undersize. An undersize pin that wears out of round quickly, does not contribute to a good trigger pull.

    5.) The Chinese wood stock is made of mystery wood … some are as soft as balsa. This wood will compress under tension, or may swell when wet, and the result may be a trigger mechanism that is unsafe = the hammer will follow the bolt down if the trigger is held back during cycling, or also have an effect on fit when latching in magazines.

    6.) The Chinese rear sight mechanism may be soft, and wear quickly to the point where adjustments are not possible, or won’t stay set. Again, replacement with US GI parts will fix.

    Recommended Chinese M-14 Modifications
    Above the cost of a basic/box stock Chinese rifle [ approximately $ 450 – 475 Canadian after shipping/taxes ] the costs to do up a Chinese M-14 properly are approximately …
    REQUIRED:
    $ 75 - Gunsmith inspection to check headspace, bolt fit and other issues.
    $ 10 – US GI op rod spring

    OPTIONAL [ in order of importance ]:
    $ 75 – reindexing barrel [ if required ]
    $ 130 – US GI Fiberglass stock
    $ 20 - long op rod guide retaining pin [ or modify GI stock for short pin ]
    $ 45 - SS one piece round/match op Rod spring guide
    $ 50 – trigger job with stock Chinese parts
    $ 80 – replacement US GI rear sight, M-14 or M1 Garand
    $ 300 – US GI Bolt [ usually required for use with .308 commercial ammo ]
    NOTE: some of the OLD Chinese will NOT take a GI bolt without also using a GI barrel
    $ 250 – US GI Barrel
    $ 40 ea - MAGS 20/5 - Chinese or $ 80 ea - USGI MAGS
    $ 60 - US GI Hammer, trigger, and pins
    After that, the sky is the limit.

    Shorty / Bush / SOCOM estimate
    Additional costs to do up a shorty are approximately :
    $ 75 - shortening barrel
    $ 75 - threading muzzle for flash hider and installing AR 15 type FH
    $ 85 - front sight that fits on the gas assembly [ Gas Ring Front Sight ] NOTE: the gas lock threads are METRIC on the Chinese barrels, so a METRIC GRFS is required

    7.62 NATO VS .308 Win
    As a GROSS GENERALIZATION for newly manufactured ammunition, the variations in external cartridge dimensions between .308 Win and 7.62 NATO cases are not that significant. Ammunition from different manufacturers, between lots of ammo from the same manufacturer, and between individual rounds within a lot, may be greater than any theoretical differences in external dimensions between 7.62 NATO and .308 Win ammunition. However, there are other very significant differences between the two types of ammunition. One such difference is that 7.62 NATO brass is usually thicker, especially at the base. Also, the brass in 7.62 NATO cases generally seems to be tougher, perhaps drawn of a stronger alloy. This thicker 7.62 brass results in smaller internal volume with 7.62 cases, so load data and reloading data is NOT interchangeable between 7.62 NATO and .308 Winchester. In semi auto rifles, the tougher / thicker 7.62 NATO brass is better both for initial firing, and for potential reloading.

    7.62 NATO military ammunition is carefully chosen to optimize performance in 7.62 NATO gas operated military rifles, like the M-14. This restricts the choices in internal and external ballistics considerably. On the other hand, .308 Winchester ammunition is designed for sporting or target use, with a wide range of intended targets, available in many bullet weights and bullet types, from many different manufactures. The really significant differences between 7.62 NATO and .308 Win ammunition may not be readily apparent, but they ARE there. Just as an example, 7.62 NATO ammunition may be loaded to higher pressures than SAAMI spec .308 Win. Bullet weights and pressure curves for 7.62 NATO take into account the inherent characteristics of a gas operated rifle, while commercial loaded .308 Win may not. Differences such as bullet weight, powder choices, retardant for the powder, Berdan or Boxer primer, crimped in primer, sealant at primer and bullet neck, crimped bullet, bullet weight, and bullet type, can all have a significant effect on safety, reliability, accuracy, and durability.

    Headspace AKA … can I shoot .308 Win commercial ammo in my Chinese M-14S … after all it is marked .308 on the receiver?
    Most .308 Win ammunition will function safely in a M-14 type rifle, if that rifle has .308 Win headspace. Headspace varies considerably with the M-14, clones or originals. The headspace of your individual M-14 type rifle will be the major consideration when determining if .308 will shoot safely. Most likely, the answer will be a qualified ... MAYBE?

    If you stray too far from 7.62 NATO standards regarding bullet weight and pressure, you can get into durability, reliability, and accuracy issues. The M-14 was designed for 150 gr bullets, with military powders tailored to have the correct pressure characteristics at the gas port. The twist in the M-14 barrels likes 168 gr bullets for excellent accuracy. Those who choose heavier bullets at high velocity, for hunting or for long range target shooting, will have to be aware that recoil from these heavier bullets can do significant damage to the M-14 rifle. Those who go too light, either in bullets or in powder, may find the gas left over at the port may not have enough power to operate the mechanism reliably and consistently. That being said, I have tested a few M-14 rifles with the sabot loaded Remington .223 55 Gr Accelerators, and this makes for a reliable shooting load, with no recoil, that may be accurate in your individual M-14. As usual, with individual opinions and experience, your personal mileage may vary.

    The M-14 rifle is incredibly sensitive to variations in ammunition, and some loads may shoot MOA out of your individual rifle, while others are closer to hour of angle. Best advice I can give on ammunition, is to try as many different brands, weights, and types of ammo, 7.62 NATO Ball and .308 Winchester, to find what your individual rifle likes. Then buy a case of it.

    How do I measure the headspace of my M-14? AKA Headspace gages:
    Measuring the headspace on an M-14 rifle is NOT rocket science, but it can be a bit complicated, especially if you don’t have all the proper tools and gauges, and know how to use them.
    Forster Winchester .308 GO: 1.630"
    Military # 7274780B GI "GAGE HEADSPACE" for 7.62 NATO GO: 1.6355"
    NOTE: the .0055" extra of the military 7.62 GO is .0015" over the .308 Win NO GO of 1.634"
    Also, the GI gage is cut out at the back for the ejector ... to allow you to measure headspace without taking the M-14 bolt apart.
    NOTE: the commercial .308 Win gages are NOT cut out for the M-14 ejector, which is spring loaded with enough power to launch it clear across your living room into the darkest corner, and into the deepest part of your shag rug. This incredible spring tension will bear directly on any gage that is not relieved for the ejector, and trying to measure headspace when the gage is being forced into the chamber, and the bolt is being forced into the receiver, is not …repeat NOT …accurate. If you are using a commercial gage that is not relieved for the ejector on an M-14, then you MUST strip the bolt first before trying to measure the headspace

    I have both .308 and Mil Spec 7.62 GO gauges, and find I really don’t need any more. With a set of feeler gauges, I can get quick and easy headspace estimates, from zero on up to very scary. This method uses the gage and the feelers to measures only the dimensions of the gap between the right side of the receiver, and the right bolt lug. If the bolt is straight, and if the wear pattern on the bolt lugs shows that the bolt is bearing evenly on both sides, then and only then, you can extrapolate that the left lug has the same gap dimension. If you want more precise measurements, without resorting to a {VERY EXPENSIVE ] set of custom gauges in .001” increments, you can make a set of spacers by cutting up a cheap set of automotive feeler gauges. Stack them up on your GO gauge, using thin grease to hold them together, and you will have as close to a perfect measurement as you can get, without resorting to expensive tools.

    What should the headspace be on an M-14 type rifle?
    For rack grade M-14 rifles7.62 NATO GO is 1.6355” [ very close to .308 NO GO ]
    7.62 NATO Field Reject is either , DEPENDING ON SOURCE., 1.6415” or 1.6445,
    NOTE, however, that the overhaul procedure for rack grade M-14 rifles specified -
    “ … to maximize barrel life (with 7.62 x 51 mm NATO ammunition)
    every effort should be made to keep maximum headspace no more than 1.6375 ".

    M-14 National Match headspace standards are as follows:
    GO 1.633"
    NO GO 1.636"
    NOTE: These recommendations are for US GI 7.62X51 NATO mil spec ammunition in a CAREFULLY cleaned and maintained match rifle

    MAXIMUM Headspace:
    When it comes to "real world" headspace, relying on headspace gages alone can provide only a precise measurement of chamber length. The other part of the equation is ammunition dimensions. So, unless you measure brass before and after firing, even in best case scenarios using a gage to measure headspace is always going to be a "best guesstimate
    .308 Win "SAAMI" FIELD REJECT is 1.638". Although I have never personally seen it or read of a documented case, in theory, some commercial .308 Win cartridge cases may fail with a case separation on the first firing at .308 NO GO.
    If your headspace is 1.638" - 1.6445", you should use only 7.62x51 NATO mil spec ammo.
    If your headspace is 1.6445" or longer, even with mil spec7.62 NATO ammunition,
    the chamber may be too long for safe use .

    MINIMUM Headspace:
    Chambers which are too tight may actually be detrimental to accuracy, reliability and safety. Also, semi auto rifles with tight chambers will require more cleaning to be reliable and or safe. If your headspace is less than 1.632", you may find the chamber too tight with some brands of .308 Win or 7.62NATO ammo. With short chamber, the case neck might be squeezed, or the bullet might be pushed back by the lands, both of which can disrupt accuracy and up pressure. Plus, with the M-14 "floating "firing pin, short chambers can increase the risk of “slam fires" especially with soft commercial primers. Finally, reloading ammo for a tight chamber may require small base dies, case trimming, and immaculate case preparation.

    When fitting M-14 headspace for new "Match" rifles, I first lap the bolt in for proper maximum contact. Then I try for 1.632" headspace [ Forster .308 Win GO gage + .002" shim cut from a feeler gage, bolt stripped to ensure ejector tension does not push gage forward ]. This measurement is usually capable of turning a STRIPPED bolt all the way down easily on most brands of NEW FACTORY .308 or 7.62 NATO ammunition. The test cartridge should fall easily out of the chamber, and there should NOT be any major marks or deformation. Remember, you are not trying to resize the cartridge with the rifle.

    Bolt to Receiver Fit …. What is the left lug doing?
    From a safety perspective, bolt lug to receiver fit can be much more critical than headspace. With the M-14 rifle, headspace is only one part of the bolt fit equation. Far too many Chinese M-14 rifles, new and old, and even some brand new M1A rifles, have the left bolt lug cut or fitted improperly. If the left bolt locking lug shows signs of being hand ground by a Dremel like implement, the possibility exists that are you are shooting with only the right locking lug engaging properly. This is much more important than a few thou headspace, but even here, most of these bolts don't cause safety problems UNLESS they are also very soft. If you also have a soft bolt with a left locking lug that is cut at too acute an angle, then in a few hundred rounds the left lug peens back, the bolt face gets cocked excess headspace can get very scary . BTDT … seen several of the OLD Chinese M-14 bolts like this.

    With the M-14, which has a very tiny and complicated left locking lug design, the bolt should be bearing EVENLY on BOTH lugs, and the bearing should be maximum. … especially at that awkward left lug. This is easily seen on a used M-14 type rifle by checking the wear patterns on the bolt lugs. On a new bolt, the way to check fit is to clean and dry the lugs in both bolt and receiver, and use a permanent felt pen [ RED is nice ] to mark the bolt lugs. With slight rearward tension, work the bolt up and down a few dozen times, remove the bolt, and inspect the wear pattern scraped out of the red ink. What you are looking for is EVEN wear on the locking lugs, with MAXIMUM bearing on BOTH lugs

    This well known and too common defect in clone M-14 rifles, is why a USGI bolt swap is such a great idea. USGI bolts go for about $ 300 these days, and a $300 upgrade to a $399 Chinese rifle may not make much sense ... until you consider that with a few minutes work lapping the bolt to the receiver, and a few other bits, you can end up with a Chinese / US GI crossbreed that is totally reliable, and as good a shooter as a Springfield M1A that costs several times as much. And that brand new expensive M1A might still need a new GI bolt to replace a cast bolt.

    PS: Not all the OLD Chinese M-14 clones have this problem … I would estimate only about 1 in 3. Recently I picked up an old Chinese M-14S at a gun show. It was ancient, stored 20 years or more, but it was almost unfired. Checking the fit of the original Chinese bolt showed almost perfect bolt lug mating to receiver, and headspace was .308 GO plus .002", which is PERFECT!!

    Detailed inspection … front to back
    1.) Flashider: Is it welded on? Is it loose? Is the castle nut on tight and locked in place by the set screw? Is the set screw loose.? Is the FH on straight? Can you see any indications that bullets are hitting the FH? Has it been reamed to NM specs? Is it cast? Is it cracked? Is it pitted and corroded? Does it have a bayonet lug? Does it have slots, or is it completely closed? Does the rifle “sing” when the bolt slams forward on an empty chamber?

    2.) Front sight: is it straight = vertical or is it rotated to one side or the other, indicating expensive reindexing? Is it loose? Is the square at the top? Is it set way off to one side? Is the sight retaining set screw there? Is it the narrower NM sight?

    3.) Barrel: is it bent? Is it tight to the receiver? Is the op rod guide tight? Is the op rod guide aligned correctly so the op rod meets the gas piston center? Is the bore chromed? Pitted? Is the chamber smooth … or are there reaming marks visible?

    4.) Gas Assembly: is it loose = rotation? Slides back and forth? Is it misaligned? Is the gas assembly plug tight? Does the gas assembly line up with the hole in the barrel? Is the gas turn off valve vertical or horizontal? Is the bore of the gas assembly corroded or worn? Does the piston move freely and smoothly? Is the piston chipped or peened? Is there carbon built up inside the gas assembly or the piston? Does the ferrule rattle? Does the hand guard ferrule tension correctly to the stock?

    5.) Op rod: Chinese op rods are forged one piece, same as the best US GI TRW op rods. Chinese op rods are usually good for hardness. Check for tab wear, bends, and cracking? Springfield op rods are often US GI, but if not, they may be cast, and vary considerably in quality. US GI op rods are, of course , the best, but most are now well worn, and rewelds from scrap pieces may be on the market. Check the weld on any two piece US GI op rods for cracks and voids. Check for bends, and that the op rod runs straight in the receiver groove?

    6.) Receiver: Field test check for softness … run a file lightly over some hidden spot see if file catches and cuts easily … if so, this receiver is too soft for long term durability. Reheat treatment may be desirable. Look for any obvious burrs, cracks, or rough spots? Some of the NEW Chinese receivers have the top of the receiver right locking lug corner cut square [ and sharp enough to cut yourself ]. This corner should provide a smooth transition between vertical to horizontal motion, and should be softly rounded and smooth. Some of the OLD Springfield Armory M1A receivers do NOT have enough clearance under the bolt roller, to allow the bolt to close completely. This will slam the bolt roller between the receiver and the op rod … which is not a good thing. Simple solution for the sharp right lug corner, and no bolt roller clearance … a Dremel with a ” wheel. Also check at the rear, where the tang of the safety rotates against the receiver … is there a groove worn into the receiver by the tang?

    Other than the above, checking the receiver for proper dimension is a job for a professional with the right tools. However, every Chinese receiver I’ve personally inspected was as good or close to US GI dimensions. Odds of you getting a bad Chinese receiver are very slim. If this is a cast commercial receiver, odds of getting some dimensional variations are very high. Whether these variations will significantly effect performance is again best left to a professional to determine. As an example, with the last Springfield M1A receiver I built up into a full house target rifle, the bolt lapping with a NEW GI TRW bolt took about 30 minutes to achieve proper bearing on both lugs. It also took about 3 hours to fit a near new TRW one piece op rod. The final product was as good as it gets, but it did take a LOT longer to fit the GI parts, than would be usual with a Chinese FORGED receiver.

    7.) BOLT: inspect the left locking lug … does it look like it was hand ground with a Dremel tool? If so it may not be properly fitted to the left locking lug. On a used bolt, check the wear patterns. On a new bolt, get some RED permanent marker ink on the lug surfaces, and inspect the seating. Does the bolt engagement provide maximum bearing evenly on both lugs? Extractor fit? Ejector spring tension? Firing pin protrusion? Timing? firing pin tang wear ?
    Test fire … go to the range and load only two rounds in the magazine … test fire one round … see if the rifle doubles? eject the second round from the chamber and look at the primer dimpling? … yes, the M-14 has a floating firing pin, with no spring to keep it away from the primers. Yes, this is scary, but on a properly set up M-14, using proper ammunition, you will not get a slam fire.

    At the last WET Coast M-14 seminar, we had one bolt that had a bit of brass stuck in the firing pin hole. This is not that uncommon with these rifles, especially if the firing pin hole is worn, or the pin tip is chipped. PAY ATTENTION HERE ... this is definitely not a good thing [ aka "INSTANT DEATH or SLAMFIRE" ].

    Because the firing pin is the inertial design, with NO RETACTING SPRING, it is a very good idea to check that firing pin hole from time to time, to see if any crud [ especially primer shavings ] is building up in there. While the firing pin/receiver camming action SHOULD still retract the firing pin even with a bit of garbage clogging the system, this is not something you want to test for your self. A clean rifle is a happy rifle ... and a lot safer too.

    Which leads to the scary question ... how do you take that bolt apart??? There are enough horror stories about M-14 bolt dissambly [ that ejector spring launches the ejector with enough power to pierce your eyeball and embed itself in your brain ...yadayadyada ] that it might pay to invest in one of the bolt disassembly tools. The tool makes it simple to disaasemble the inside gubbins, and keep the firing pin channel clean.



    8.) Rear Sight: Is the rear sight tight, or does it move around a lot if you wiggle the aperture arm? Is the hole in the rear sight centered? Does the rear sight move up and down? Does the rear sight adjust left to right? Does the sight stay set ?

    9.) Trigger group: does the trigger group lock in with a bit of spring [ about ” of tension ]? Does the safety lock the firing mechanism when engaged? Does the safety move with correct tension? With no magazine in the rifle, hammer cocked, and safety on, does the hammer follow if you drop the bolt on an empty chamber? Try this again with the safety off to test the front hooks on the hammer? Now, with the trigger held back, test the rear hooks on the hammer by trying this again? Is the trigger pull creepy? What is the weight of the trigger pull? Measure it carefully …4 and 1/2 lbs is the MINIMUM safe weight. If it is less than 4 lbs, then the hammer may follow in some circumstances. … especially if the rifle is not held tightly against the shoulder.

    NOTE: changing stocks on the M-14 rifle can definitely change the way the trigger functions, so every time you swap the stock on an M-14 type rifle, you should do this trigger group safety check again.

    .At the range, after performing test firing for test # 7, load five rounds … hold the rifle loosely … and fire all five rounds. With the rifle held loosely, did it double … or worse yet, run away with the whole magazine?

    10.) Magazine: Pinned correctly to meet Candian firearms laws to 5 rds ONLY? Latches in the receiver tightly? Bent lips? Dents? Follower? Spring?

    11.) Stock: Is the receiver tight to the bedding lugs? Receiver tight at top rear bedding surface? Does the receiver slide back and forth in the stock? Are the bearing surfaces for the trigger guard compressed in? Does the trigger guard lock in with correct tension? Is the front of stock tight against the ferrule? Ferrule greased? Hand guard cracked? Loose? Clearances at top of fore stock? Butt plate bent? If using a GI stock with a clone, has the connector lock pin been replaced with a longer one, or has the stock been padded to keep the shorter commercial connector lock from shuffling out? If using a Fiberglass GI stock, does the butt plate have the correct top screw, nut and nut retainer?

    12.) Accessories: did you get a complete cleaning kit? Have you looked in the butt trap? Did you get a sling? Bayonet? Spare Magaziness?

    13.) Scope mount … is this one of the very few gawdawfulexpensive scope mounts recommended by the CGN scope mount FAQs that will actually work, or is it cheap no name TRASH??? If you paid a lot less for it than you did for the rifle, then it is most likely TRASH. If you can shoot better with Iron sights than you can with a scope, then your scope mount is loose … and is probably TRASH.

    PS: did you get the message yet … there are a lot of scope mounts out there for the M-14, but most of them are TRASH..


    Quote Originally Posted by J996 View Post



    How to use your iron sights

    I thought I would post this because I don't see very many M14's around that aren't scoped. It and the M1 have the greatest irons ever put on a rifle!!

    * EDIT* Old guys, I know you cant see anymore did not mean to pick on you.

    I know not everybody has been in the service or really had the instruction to become lethal with irons so here it is. Get yourself a nice Garand rear sight and have at er.

    This is the base formula for these standard issue rifle sights (M14/Garand).
    1 click changes the impact of the bullet approx 1" @ 100m/y
    M14 sight is graduated in meters M1 sight in yards.

    Elevation adjustment range: 0-72 clicks
    Windage adjustment range: 16 clicks L or R of center index.

    With your rear sight windage index lined up in the center, adjust your front sight side to side until you are shooting exactly center line. This is best done at 25m from a rest at a piece of 1" wide vertical tape.

    For Bullseye zero: Zero @ 100m (usually 6-8 clicks up from bottom).
    Elevation: Once you are in the bull @ 100m with a 6 o'clock hold, dial the elevation all the way down while carefully counting the number of clicks. REMEMBER THIS NUMBER IT IS YOUR ZERO! Dial the elevation back up, again counting the clicks. Now loosen your elev knob pinion screw while firmly holding the aperture in place and set the dial to the 100m mark. Tighten the screw and fire on target to confirm zero. All of your sight adjustments will now work off this specific number of clicks which is your zero. Remember that every rifle will be slightly different.

    Hungry here: I like to tighten the (single hand tight , not 2 hands...) elevation pinion screw, then bottom out your aperture, tighten up more. Crank up your aperture all the way to the top, then tighten up AGAIN!

    For battle zero: Zero @ 250m (usually 12-13 clicks up from bottom)
    Then shoot point of aim. Allows for engagement of man sized targets from 0-400m by aiming center mass. This is of course not for precision shooting.



    Using the sight working off your bullseye zero.
    Range 200: 1 click = 2"
    Range 300: 1 click = 3"
    Range 400: 1 click = 4"
    Range 500: 1 click = 5"
    Range 600: 1 click = 6"
    and so on.

    M14 issue rifle 22" barrel 26" sight radius.

    Range 200: Your shot hits 8" low. Raise elevation 4 clicks, fire.
    Range 500: Your shot hits 15" low. Raise elevation 3 clicks, fire.
    Range 600: Your shot hits a foot high. Lower elevation 2 clicks, fire.
    Range 300: Your shot hits 9" high. Do the math Fire!

    You always round up your clicks. Range 400: Your shot hits 10" high. You will lower elevation 3 clicks not 2.

    Once you've mastered the grade 4 math calculations you can hit the range.
    Target 500m. You turn your elevation knob to the 500m mark to engage a target at that distance and fire a spotting round.
    Your spotter tells you it missed, 20" low, correction 4 clicks elevation, fire.
    Once you become one with your rifle you will know the number of comeups (clicks) from zero required to make hits at certain distances. You can put them on a small laminated card and tape it to the stock. As long as you have that info you can simply estimate range, dial in and actually make a first round hit on target with that particular rifle.
    Example: Target 400m, +16, fire.

    Always reset your rifle back to its zero (and the windage back to center) when finished. If you cant remember write it on your rifle stock. Once you get good at this you will be able to make hits at varying distances very quickly.

    Hungry here: At 100yds/meters, use every attempt to mechanically center your rear sight base with respect to the vernier scale (I like Whiteout or model paint) that is easier to read. Then zero for windage by (allen key to loosen) tweaking the front sight in the opposite direction you want the MPI or bullet strike to move into. This is for very serious competition or for you perfection addicts! LOL

    Windage knob Corrections
    Formula is the same: 1 click L or R @ 100m shifts bullet impact approx 1"
    @200m - 1 click = 2"
    @300m - 1 click = 3"
    and so on.

    Correcting for Wind G.I. formula

    Range X Windspeed divided by 10 = Number of clicks.

    Winds coming from 12 and 6 o'clock have little effect. No correction.
    Winds coming from 1,5,7,11 o' clock have a slight effect. Half correction.
    Winds coming from 2,3,4, and 8,9,10 o'clock have greatest effect. Full correction.

    Range 500:
    Wind: 6 mph
    Direction: 9 o'clock

    5X6 = 30 div 10 = 3

    Answer: 3 clicks, full correction, left windage

    If it was a 1 o'clock wind it would be a half correction (1.5 clicks) On a standard GI sight that wont go so remember, round up your clicks.
    It would be 2 clicks, right windage.

    Test
    Range 400, 5 o'clock wind 18mph. Your first shot is a foot low and to the left of the target. How would you adjust your sights to try to make a hit with the next shot?

    National match sights
    They are 1/2 MOA per click GI are 1 MOA per click. Just X everything by 2.

    Hungry if I missed anything please add it.

    Hungry here: Pretty darn good, I must say. I'm still looking!

    Quote Originally Posted by Art Luppino



    How to Lap your M14 bolt to your receiver

    This procedrure should ONLY be done if you do not have bolt roller receiver rail impact. Read The Sticky on Roller Impact first.

    Equipment needed: 600 and 800 lapping compound, small screw driver, 1/8" tip, broad tip black felt pen, fine steel wool, soft jaw vise and punch that will fit ext. hole in bolt. Tool to cut case in half.

    Disassemble rifle and strip bolt, clean all lube off reciever and bolt surfaces. Pick several cases fired in this rifle, if one will still fit in chamber it's the one to use. If none will fit, resize several and clean with sreel wool , clean thoroughly. Deburr rims and case mouths.

    Cut selected case in half, one inch up from base. deburr cut area. Take the hammer spring out of your trigger group and put it between the two halves of the case. Insert this unit into the chamber, there will be over hang, thats ok.

    Put a good coat of black ink on the back of the bolt lugs, put the bolt into the rifle, insert the punch into the ext. hole and push the bolt into the full lock position, if there is too much pressure find another spring that will work, one that offers strong drive back pressure on the bolt face. Using the punch as a rachet, work the bolt open and closed in short strokes, not to ride over the top of rec. rail. Do this 10 or 12 times and remove bolt. You can read the displaced ink on bolt lugs and see which one is getting the most load, it's the longer of the two.

    Remove the bolt,, with the screw driver, spread a smooth thin coat of 600 compoumd on the rec, recoil lugs, not on the bolt lugs,


    don't let the compound get into other places as you put it back into the rifle. Hold the punch firmly and run the bolt into full lock position. Work bolt up and down as before 10 to 20 times and remove, clean all compound off bolt and rec. Read the back of the bolt lugs, the new shinny surface is the lapping. Repeat this procedure until approx. 60 to 65% of the lug surface is new, now change to the 800 compound and repeat until 75 to 80% is new. Do not try to go farther , this is pleny and the job is complete, Clean up, lube, put the rifle together and you have a save and better weapon.

    If some of this is unclear, and there maybe some grey areas, drop me a line, Art Luppino

    Quote Originally Posted by Satain



    How to bed your M14 rifle





    M14 Diagram





    Tips from the Masters themselves M14 Doc and Hungry...



    Quote Originally Posted by M14Doc & Hungry



    To remove sights follow these steps;

    First adjust windage all the way to the left as far as it will go.
    Next, undo the windage lock sleeve with flat blade screw driver, turn until loose, do not try and remove, collar is held in with a retaining clip.
    Next, with collar loose, undo the windage knob and remove the knob.
    Remove elevation pinion by pulling out of sight base
    Remove aperture
    Insert flat blade screw driver into aperture area under sight cover and gently pry up until it springs loose.
    Done.

    Installation,
    Clean and regrease all parts
    Install sight base and rear cover together
    Dab of grease to receiver at sight location recess
    Use flat blade screw driver under back of sight base on bottom lip of sight cover and push firmly, sight cover should snap into place
    Next, install aperture
    Next install elevation pinion, ensuring it is completely in and meshed with aperture.
    Slide sight base to the left side
    Install windage knob and hold with your thumb, turn the lock collar only in a reverse direction until you feel it sink in a bit it has now engaged the pinion shaft correctly
    Next turn the collar with screw driver forward until it comes just snug
    Then turn windage knob to engage with sight base
    Adjust lock collar as needed to tighten or loosen the sight knobs

    To adjust elevation to agree with barrel length follow these instructions
    For standard length barrels:
    Turn elevation knob to put aperture at it's lowest point.
    Next turn elevation knob to put aperture 8 clicks from bottom
    Firmly grasp elevation knob and undo screw in elevation knob. You want to prevent any movement of aperture and knob while undoing the screw
    Once loose, again hold aperture so it can not move and turn knob to line up the 200 yrd/mtr sight mark with the sight mark on the receiver
    Tighten screw while holding knob firmly
    Turn windage and observe 8 clicks from bottom to 200 yard zero

    For 18 inch barrels try 12 clicks from bottom for 200 zero (M-14 Doc)


    Web site with pics and info for rear sight removal…below

    http://www.civilianmarksmanship.com/...ripsight3.html





    Detailed inspection … front to back

    1.) Flashider: Is it welded on? Is it loose? Is the castle nut on tight and locked in place by the set screw? Is the set screw loose.? Is the FH on straight? Can you see any indications that bullets are hitting the FH? Has it been reamed to NM specs? Is it cast? Is it cracked? Is it pitted and corroded?

    Does it have a bayonet lug?
    Does it have slots, or is it completely closed? Does the rifle “sing” when the bolt slams forward on an empty chamber?

    2.) Front sight: is it straight = vertical or is it rotated to one side or the other, indicating expensive reindexing? Is it loose? Is the square at the top? Is it set way off to one side? Is the sight retaining set screw there? Is it the narrower NM sight?

    3.) Barrel: is it bent? Is it tight to the receiver? Is the op rod guide tight? Is the op rod guide aligned correctly so the op rod meets the gas piston center? Is the bore chromed? Pitted? Is the chamber smooth … or are there reaming marks visible?


    4.) Gas Assembly: is it loose = rotation? Slides back and forth? Is it misaligned? Is the gas assembly plug tight? Does the gas assembly line up with the hole in the barrel? Is the gas turn off valve vertical or horizontal? Is the bore of the gas assembly corroded or worn? Does the piston move freely and smoothly? Is the piston chipped or peened? Is there carbon built up inside the gas assembly or the piston? Does the ferrule rattle? Does the hand guard ferrule tension correctly to the stock?

    5.) Op rod: Chinese op rods are forged one piece, same as the best US GI TRW op rods. Chinese op rods are usually good for hardness. Check for tab wear, bends, and cracking? Springfield op rods are often US GI, but if not, they may be cast, and vary considerably in quality. US GI op rods are, of course, the best, but most are now well worn, and rewelds from scrap pieces may be on the market. Check the weld on any two piece US GI op rods for cracks and voids. Check for bends, and that the op rod runs straight in the receiver groove?

    6.) Receiver: Field test check for softness … run a file lightly over some hidden spot see if file catches and cuts easily … if so, this receiver is too soft for long term durability. Reheat treatment may be desirable. Look for any obvious burrs, cracks, or rough spots? Some of the NEW Chinese receivers have the top of the receiver right locking lug corner cut square [ and sharp enough to cut yourself ]. This corner should provide a smooth transition between vertical to horizontal motion, and should be softly rounded and smooth. Some of the OLD Springfield Armoury M1A receivers do NOT have enough clearance under the bolt roller, to allow the bolt to close completely. This will slam the bolt roller between the receiver and the op rod … which is not a good thing. Simple solution for the sharp right lug corner, and no bolt roller clearance … a Dremel with a ” wheel. Also check at the rear, where the tang of the safety rotates against the receiver … is there a groove worn into the receiver by the tang?

    Other than the above, checking the receiver for proper dimension is a job for a professional with the right tools. However, every Chinese receiver I’ve personally inspected was as good or close to US GI dimensions. Odds of you getting a bad Chinese receiver are very slim. If this is a cast commercial receiver, odds of getting some dimensional variations are very high. Whether these variations will significantly effect performance is again best left to a professional to determine. As an example, with the last Springfield M1A receiver I built up into a full house target rifle, the bolt lapping with a NEW GI TRW bolt took about 30 minutes to achieve proper bearing on both lugs. It also took about 3 hours to fit a near new TRW one piece op rod. The final product was as good as it gets, but it did take a LOT longer to fit the GI parts, than would be usual with a Chinese FORGED receiver.

    7.) BOLT: inspect the left locking lug … does it look like it was hand ground with a Dremel tool? If so it may not be properly fitted to the left locking lug. On a used bolt, check the wear patterns. On a new bolt, get some RED permanent marker ink on the lug surfaces, and inspect the seating. Does the bolt engagement provide maximum bearing evenly on both lugs? Extractor fit? Ejector spring tension? Firing pin protrusion? Timing? firing pin tang wear ?
    Test fire … go to the range and load only two rounds in the magazine … test fire one round … see if the rifle doubles? eject the second round from the chamber and look at the primer dimpling? … yes, the M-14 has a floating firing pin, with no spring to keep it away from the primers. Yes, this is scary, but on a properly set up M-14, using proper ammunition, you will not get a slam fire.

    At the last WET Coast M-14 seminar, we had one bolt that had a bit of brass stuck in the firing pin hole. This is not that uncommon with these rifles, especially if the firing pin hole is worn, or the pin tip is chipped. PAY ATTENTION HERE ... this is definitely not a good thing [ aka "INSTANT DEATH or SLAMFIRE" ].

    Because the firing pin is the inertial design, with NO RETACTING SPRING, it is a very good idea to check that firing pin hole from time to time, to see if any crud [ especially primer shavings ] is building up in there. While the firing pin/receiver camming action SHOULD still retract the firing pin even with a bit of garbage clogging the system, this is not something you want to test for your self. A clean rifle is a happy rifle ... and a lot safer too.

    Which leads to the scary question ... how do you take that bolt apart??? There are enough horror stories about M-14 bolt disassembly [that ejector spring launches the ejector with enough power to pierce your eyeball and embed itself in your brain ,,,,that it might pay to invest in one of the bolt disassembly tools. The tool makes it simple to disassemble the inside parts, and keep the firing pin channel clean.

    8.) Rear Sight: Is the rear sight tight, or does it move around a lot if you wiggle the aperture arm? Is the hole in the rear sight centered? Does the rear sight move up and down? Does the rear sight adjust left to right? Does the sight stay set?

    9.) Trigger group: does the trigger group lock in with a bit of spring [ about ” of tension ]? Does the safety lock the firing mechanism when engaged? Does the safety move with correct tension? With no magazine in the rifle, hammer cocked, and safety on, does the hammer follow if you drop the bolt on an empty chamber? Try this again with the safety off to test the front hooks on the hammer? Now, with the trigger held back, test the rear hooks on the hammer by trying this again? Is the trigger pull creepy? What is the weight of the trigger pull? Measure it carefully …4 and 1/2 lbs is the MINIMUM safe weight. If it is less than 4 lbs, then the hammer may follow in some circumstances. … Especially if the rifle is not held tightly against the shoulder.

    NOTE: changing stocks on the M-14 rifle can definitely change the way the trigger functions, so every time you swap the stock on an M-14 type rifle, you should do this trigger group safety check again.

    .At the range, after performing test firing for test # 7, load five rounds … hold the rifle loosely … and fire all five rounds. With the rifle held loosely, did it double … or worse yet, run away with the whole magazine?

    10.) Magazine: Pinned correctly to meet Canadian firearms laws to 5 rounds ONLY? Latches in the receiver tightly? Bent lips? Dents? Follower? Spring?

    11.) Stock: Is the receiver tight to the bedding lugs? Receiver tight at top rear bedding surface? Does the receiver slide back and forth in the stock? Are the bearing surfaces for the trigger guard compressed in? Does the trigger guard lock in with correct tension? Is the front of stock tight against the ferrule? Ferrule greased? Hand guard cracked? Loose? Clearances at top of fore stock? Butt plate bent? If using a GI stock with a clone, has the connector lock pin been replaced with a longer one, or has the stock been padded to keep the shorter commercial connector lock from shuffling out? If using a Fibreglass GI stock, does the butt plate have the correct top screw, nut and nut retainer?

    12.) Scope mount … is this one of the very few scope mounts recommended by the CGN scope mount FAQs that will actually work, or is it cheap no name TRASH??? If you paid a lot less for it than you did for the rifle, then it is most likely TRASH. If you can shoot better with Iron sights than you can with a scope, then your scope mount is loose … and is probably TRASH.

    Before buying any parts/accessories to improve accuracy do the following:

    - Give barrel a good cleaning
    - Check the gas system/cylinder for play/movement and proper cylinder lock indexing
    - Check to see how tight the trigger locks up into the stock
    - properly lube the rifle

    if everything looks good at this point, try different ammunition.........

    You may have to do some tweaking on the rifle to get it to where you want.
    The most common issue is a loose gas cylinder assembly..........easy to fix this.........

    Also get rid of the cheap softwood Chinese stock. many shooters report accuracy improving by simple switching to an aftermarket M14/M1A stock.........best bet is to pick up a surplus USGI fibreglass stock.........
    Make sure the hand guard is not contacting the sides of the stock in any way.........

    Most common Mods are replacing the factory op rod guide with a National Match Spec Guide, and replacing the op rod spring with a USGI spring...........
    To go any further will cost more money.........you will want to look at head spacing/bolt fitment........glass bedding the stock/action.........re-barrelling to a match spec barrel..........



    Lubricating the M14 Type Rifles

    The only two things you want to lube with gun oil are the trigger assembly pivot points, and the firing pin. All other lubing should be done with good quality grease.

    You want to grease the following areas:
    -Bolt roller
    -bolt lugs
    -The bolt tracks inside the receiver
    -the underside of the bolt
    -the nose of the hammer
    -Operating Rod track
    -Inside the Op Rod "hump"(where the bolt roller fits. HINT a small syringe filled with grease works great for lubing this area).
    -Recoil spring guide rod
    -Where the Op Rod slides through the op rod guide

    Buy a few for yourself and fill them with whatever CHEAP grease works for your purposes (cold-snowmobile , high-tech- Plastilube, cheap- Ukrainian Tire Bearing Grease) my personal favorite grease is Super Lube clear synthetic, been using it for over almost a decade on my rifles and salt water fishing reels

    DO NOT use any lube/oil on the gas assembly!!!!This is a dry gas system. If you use any type of lube here, powder residue will cake up and plug the gas system. You can use a little bore cleaner to clean the gas system, but then make sure to thoroughly clean afterwards. The inside of the gas cylinder nut and the gas piston need to be cleaned out periodically, or carbon will build up inside them and, causing the rifle to "bark" and cycle harder if left long enough. You can use a 5/16 drill bit TURNED IN YOUR FINGERS to clean out the carbon build up from the inside of the gas piston and gas nut. DO NOT use any drills or the like to clean out the inside of the gas cylinder assembly!!!You do not want to scratch the interior walls of the gas cylinder. I would say the gas system should be cleaned every 400 to 500 rounds.

    The gas nut does not have to be "cranked" on super tight. Just snug it down enough that it won't loosen up from the recoil. Check the gas nut for tightness every so often.

    When cleaning the bore, clean the rifle upside down. This is a critical step if your action has been bedded. This way keeps cleaning solvents from seeping between the stock and reciever.The bore cleaner will eat away at the bedding material.

    You must clean the bore from the muzzle end on these rifles. To keep the bolt from releasing, lock back the bolt and insert a steel stripper clip into the stripper clip guide so that i covers the bolt face. This will stop you from releasing the bolt inadvertently with your cleaning rod(this trick only works if you have the original stripper clip guide. Won’t work if you have a 3rd generation scope mount).For a bore guide, take a spent 12 gauge shot shell, and cut of the crimped end. Then drill out the spent primer slightly larger then your cleaning rod. This will slip perfectly over the flash suppressor and protect the muzzle crown and inside of the flash suppressor form cleaning rod damage



    The infamous ARMS 18 jamming issue......

    what is at play here is simply the ejection profile of your rifle.
    Not all rifles have an issue so JUST because you have an arms 18..... Does NOT mean your rifle WILL jam.
    My recommendation is this, install your arms 18 and go shoot it...... try standard rounds ie: 147/150 grain...... then try some heavier loads, i.e. :165/168 grain and see what happens.
    If you get a jam i.e.: ejected case falls back in chamber, OR more commonly, ejected case gets trapped between the closing oprod and the mount, right at the receiver ring.

    IF you’re particular rifle exhibits this problem....... GENERALLY it is solved by trimming your bolts extractor (2 coils on most) and ejector spring (3 coils on most). This has solved the issue on EVERY rifle I have personally owned or worked on.
    NO NEED to upgrade your springs
    I have offered the bolt spring trimming service for those who can not disassemble their bolt..... t a nominal charge of 40.00 return shipping included. If folks want to take advantage of this service, when I open up again in June, you can send your bolts in.

    The Arms 18 is my number one choice for scoping the m14/m1a
    ARMS also makes 1" and 30mm throw lever rings designed for use with the arms18. Allows for removal of scope for use of irons and with quality optics, a return to zero when scope is put back on.
    Avoid knock offs or other brands, get the arms throw levers.



    Installing An ARMS18 Mount by M14 Doc

    I find it odd that so many folks have issues getting ARMS 18 style mounts to align correctly.

    Here's my tips:

    * Get rid of the horse shoe washer on the inside of the retaing bolt. This lil bugger is what offsets the front of the mount... I ditch it everytime.

    * The rear screw that attaches to the stripper clip guide key. This has an adjustable pad that is key to alignment.

    * Remove the screw and use a slot screw driver to adjust. First step is to back it out so it doesn't make contact upon "test fit" install. Same goes for the front pad.

    **on my promag version this rear adjustable pad was installed backwards from the package. The slotted face should face up, away from the receiver.

    * Snug fit the side bolt and set a 3/4 or 1" dowel on the mount. Observe position.

    * Then slowly bring rear pad to just touch the clip guide key.

    * Install rear screw to just snug, then fully tighten side bolt

    * Check alignment and level.

    * These can now be adjusted by removing rear screw and lessening or increasing the tension of the rear pad. Reinstall screw and fully tighten.

    * Finally adjust front pad until it just touches receiver.

    Seems to work every time for me, and I install an awful lot of the ARMS18 style mounts.



    Gas Cylinder Shimming

    If you gas cylinder is loose or has any play on the barrel, this will be detrimental to accuracy & consistency.
    Your gas cylinder needs to be shimmed in order for it to tighten up and align properly and not have any play. My M14 developed a loose gas cylinder and had to be shimmed.
    The barrel and gas cylinder both have a matching port that allows the spent gases from the cartridge to reach the gas piston and cycle the action. If these ports do not line up, gas does not reach the gas piston, and therefore the action does not cycle. Then you must cycle the action by hand.
    The gas cylinder lock should start to tighten up at the 3 or 4 o'clock position, and be tight at the 6 o'clock position. If the gas lock tightens up past the 6 o'clock position, then the gas cylinder needs to be shimmed.
    Now if your gas lock tightens up past the 6 o'clock position, in order to re install the gas nut you must back off the gas lock to be able to screw in the gas nut. This pulls the gas cylinder forward from the shoulder on the barrel in which the gas system butts up against and causes there to be play in the gas system. This isn't good for accuracy.
    In order to shim the gas cylinder, you need to remove the flash suppressor and gas cylinder assembly. You should use a pair of Castle nut pliers to undo the castle nut(this nut holds the flash suppressor on the barrel and is held tight by a small Allen set screw).Depending on when your rifle was made, the flash suppressor may be silver soldered to the barrel with two solder spots on the underside of the flash suppressor.

    Flash suppressor removal video:

    Installing shims is easy. There are two ways to do it. If you can pull off the flash hider, pull everything forward of the stock ferrule off of the barrel. There should be a machined lip on the barrel. That is where the shim(s) go. Put one or two on, test fit.

    The second way is less ideal. If your flash hider is welded on, cut the shim at a 45 degree angle, and then slip it around the same shoulder as the first method, without pulling everything off of the barrel.

    Quote Originally Posted by M14Doc & Hungry



    Gas System Unitising.

    A really FAST way of tightening up your groups.
    We have to unitize this to prevent more rattling around of the barrel components. 2 methods are advocated in the US: USARMY drills and taps 2 screws (can't recall if they are # 8 or # 6) from the rear of the (annealed) front band into the rear of the STAINLESS STEEL gas cylinder, around the permanently immobilized spindle valve.
    The second way is the USMC method which involves TIG (not oxy-acetylene) welding the front band to the STAINLESS STEEL gas cylinder body.
    NOTE: Norinco Gas Cylinders are NOT Stainless steel but Chro-moly.
    Oh yeah, clamp the 2 pieces together.... I emphasize that the gas cylinder is stainless material so that the experienced welders lurking in the group will get a "heads up" on the TIG. I've been advising my welder buddies to locate the relief hole "tab" and "tack" (just a little bit) on the front band. This is the vital operation.... Now the remaining tacks can be ABOVE the gas cylinder body, up in the surrounding barrel band at 1000 hrs and 1400 hrs.
    Now take a round file and dress/clean off the alignment of the interior of the front band, hopefully the "C" clamp holding the front band and gas cylinder did not shift on you while welding.
    I forgot to mention to anneal the front band (before welding) and bend up the steel "tabs" for the handguard..... Fat barrel soon to be located there. I use a pair of pliers for this one. Don't scratch the front band and if you do, file off the scars and touch up with Birchwood Casey's cold blue.


    Assemble your rifle tightly with everything centered and as you want it once it is welded. Using a prick or center punch, make mate marks. Try to make the marks in the areas where the welds will go (10:00, 2:00 and 6:00). That way, they will be welded over and you won't have divots in your newly unitized gas system.

    Disassemble the rifle. With a wire wheel, buffing wheel or sand paper, clean the areas around where the welds will go. Do a final wipe of the area with acetone on a rag. Clean, shiny metal is what you want to see. Any oxidization or oils will make your welds weak.
    Mount the barrel (with or without receiver) pointing upwards in a vice. Ground the vice or bench, if it is metal. Install the barrel band and gas cylinder, lining up your mate marks. Clamp the two parts together with the gas cylinder lock.


    Because the steel is a chrome-molybdenum alloy, it's a good idea to preheat (it's always a good idea to preheat) with a torch. Preheating burns-off oils in the metal, promotes penetration (a weld sitting on the surface may as well be caulk or bubblegum) and it reduces the likelihood of crystallizing the metal around the welds (which is where weldments usually fail). You don't want to melt everything together, you just want it warm. It shouldn't glow and the clean metal shouldn't change colour.

    Get some filler rod. Smaller diameters are easier to control and need less heat (smaller puddles). Big filler rods need more heat to melt and leave larger deposits. That means more heat on your barrel and gas system - not good. I used a 1/16" dia. ER70S-2 rod. It is specifically for joining chro-moly steels. If you don't have any of that handy you can use stainless filler rod. If you really have to, you can chip the flux off of an E309 stainless SMAW rod and use it.

    Starting at 6:00, tack the joints in all three spots. Let it cool and see that it is straight. If everything is level, make three 1/16"x3/16"lg spot welds. Work quickly and make good welds, being careful not to put too much heat into the barrel and assembly.

    When all three spot welds are finished, post heat with a torch, so that there is even heat in the assembly. This prevents warping from uneven cooling. Take some old welding mitts, aprons or any other rawhide and wrap the assembly around the weldment, this keeps it from cooling too quickly and warping and forming micro-cracks. Leave the barrel pointing upward as close to vertical as possible. Remember, the barrel took some heat and needs to cool too. By being vertical, the cooling will be even along the longitudinal axis of the barrel.



    Op Rod Alignment

    When the oprod guide on the barrel has rotational play affecting alignment to gas piston..... This will affect repeatable accuracy and groupings due to inconsistent oprod/piston contact. This condition also affects wear to the bolt roller, oprod tab and bearing surfaces as well as the receiver oprod track
    Word has it that rack grade usgi m14 rifles had this play also and was only dealt with if extreme, or if performing national match modifications.

    So in other words, a loose oprod guide is not the end of the world but if trying to wring out every bit of repeatable accuracy in any given rifle.... solidly anchoring the oprod guide in a fashion that aligns it on center with the piston is the way to go.
    You will need the following.
    …a fine point center punch,a suitable hammer,red loctite, possibly a new 1/8x3/4 roll pin or solid drill rod (my favourite),soft jaw vice.

    -remove oprod guide
    -use a hand knurling tool to knurl the barrel's oprod guide location OR in absence of a knurling tool..... the accepted method is as follows: -make rows of 3 or 4 punch marks, close together running from chamber end to muzzle end, around the circumference of the oprod guide barrel location.
    -apply red loctite and reinstall the oprod guide and pin...... the punch marks should have caused enough metal distortion that the oprod guide will be a bit tough to get back on.
    - install gas assembly, oprod, spring and guide rod.
    - tap the oprod guide into position so as to align the center of oprod tube to center of gas piston.
    leave it to set until the next day




    Short Stroking, From Hungry

    Any time the rifle fires a round and fails to have the inertia to reload the next round.... Is the definition of a short stroke
    Most often we look at the gas system first
    -spindle valve
    -gas plug
    -verify with 1/16 drill rod that gas port is clear by passing up thru hole in bottom of cylinder. Shine bore light to verify drill rod passes thru cylinder into barrel
    - verify visible piston vacuum by holding rifle muzzle up, oprod removed, and push piston into cylinder, quickly remove finger, if it drops slow... This is good.... If it drops like a stone..... Here’s your culprit... You need a new piston
    - crap in cylinder, carbon build up in gas plug and piston hollows
    - lubricant in gas system- these are dry gas systems and operating with lube of any kind in there will surely destroy your gas system in short order

    Oprods and oprod tracks with burrs, especially on out of index rifles and on very tight fitting oprods cause the oprod travel speed to be hindered and can cause short strokes.
    Oprod rubbing on the stock up near where the oprop arm ends , classic issue on some Chinese stocks.

    Improperly seated magazine ' if it's very difficult to seat the mag, a small amount of polishing can be done to the mags rear tab on the bottom edge the mag catch locks on. Don't go crazy, just polish until you can seat the mag and hear the mag catch click as it engages
    There’s many other causes of short strokes, but the above are more common.



    Tilt Test

    From the M-14 Doctor the tilt test is as follows

    remove trigger and stock
    remove oprod spring and guide rod
    remove oprod and bolt
    install oprod
    hold rifle horizontally in front of you without interfering with oprod and its travel
    tilt rifle down at the muzzle to approx 30 degrees from horizontal. oprod should slide freely to it's forward most travel
    next tilt receiver end down to approx 30 degrees below horizontal and the oprod should freely slide back to the rearmost of its travel

    If your rifle PASSES this test, do the following..put action with oprod only in place on the bench, resting on the receiver legs ..now slide the oprod through it's travel slowly and while doing so, apply alternating vertical up and down pressure to the oprod handle as it slides along. IF YOU HAVE a very minor amount of vertical movement you are probably ok ,...
    .. if you have NOTICEABLE WIGGLE through the travel of the oprod.......simply and honestly put.... You need a new oprod
    IF YOU FAIL the 30 degree tilt test.... and the oprod is binding..... look for causes
    common causes are as follows
    First check oprod guide and see if it is on center and if it has excess rotational play.... lots of wiggle
    Next and before dealing with a loose oprod guide, ENSURE barrel indexing is true,
    IF the barrel is indexed true and the oprod guide is not the issue, next we look at the flange on the side of the receiver that the oprod slides on. Felt pen or Dykem blue this flange and slide oprod back and forth to see where the oprod is binding. alcohol will remove the pen or dykem blue.
    Now it gets tricky.... you may have a oprod that has a bend in it or twist..... Not uncommon but hard to detect if you don't know what to look for.

    So remedy..... Well first, try a friend’s oprod if you have someone handy.
    if barrel index is good and oprod guide is good..... And the friends’ oprod works fine..... it's a twisted or out of spec oprod.
    if the friends oprod does the same thing..... I’d be looking at a binding surface on the receiver and treating it by polishing and deburring with xxx fine instruments.



    Consistent bad grouping??? From M-14 Doc

    Turn the spindle valve from up-and-down slot to horizontal. That will eliminate all the extra variables from the op rod and spring cycling back and forwards.

    If you are a skilled shooter, then diagnose the rifle. If you are not a skilled shooter, diagnose yourself. Do you wear ordinary eyeglasses, or are they high index? Depending on where you look through the lens, the sight alignment will not be the same. (I found this out from many relays with vertical stringing with my target rifles.) For me the solution was a very finely adjustable cheek rest.
    Your box standard Norinco stock will not align your head properly to any scope. Unless you have perfect muscle memory, your head isn't going back to exactly the same spot. So whatever you do, build up the cheek rest and give yourself a 'kisser' to index with your lip.

    Inspect your flash hider; make sure it hasn't loosened slightly....
    check gas lock tightness. If gas lock is too tight it can cause vertical stringing as the barrel heats up.
    One beautiful thing that the Chinese accidentally did was how they machined the gas lock. it goes on tighter or looser depending which side you choose to thread on.
    Example , for a fun gun, blasting away, no real concern for barrel heating or MOA accuracy, you are aiming center mass A zone. the gas lock should be looser, coming hand tight at 7:00 and then backed off to 6:00. general battlefield rifles should be set up in this manner. less tension at the gas lock, means reduced stringing effect as the barrelled assembly heats up.
    For target, cold barrel shooting, gas lock should come hand tight to 5:00 and tool tight at 6:00, tighter than this and as the barrel heats up YOU WILL GET STRINGING in most standard profile barrels.

    Gas pistons have a HUGE affect on accuracy as well. When all other accurizing work is done on my rifles, I then do a piston test with as many pistons as i have that will fit the cylinder. I let the rifle and load of choice dictate which piston it performs best with. This is one step to final accurizing that I've learned from my friends in the US...... a long time practice by some of the best National Guard shooting teams in the states.



    Mods From M-14 Doc

    While many shoot just fine with the stocks they come in..... in the long run replacing to something a lil sturdier than the "chu wood" is recommended for the accuracy seekers.
    While I’m NOT a fan of the new plastic Chinese stocks, they are an improvement. However, most need to be adjusted at the ferule end to do away with any forward gas band contact.

    Next up on my list is a complete check to ensure barrel is indexed correctly, then we check that the flash hider is correctly machined and true to the barrel splines. Then we check the same for the gas assembly. Oprod guide is then checked and locked in place with oprod in alignment with gas piston.
    Then it's checking the bolt lugs for even wear against the receiver..... Then we check headspace. USGI bolts are used to tighten up headspace on match rifles..... as installing a usgi bolt properly will give you headspace in the true .308 range, meaning no more surplus Nato or Nato spec ammo.
    Then we look at the rear sights..... Many if not most Chinese sights are junk, although if yours seem to function correctly, leave them be.

    Simple upgrades...... replacing the stock springs with aftermarket..... such as a Springfield M1A or Wolfe M1A spring upgrade pack(order from Brownells). Next would be replacing the stock oprod spring guide rod with a aftermarket NM version..... Tartan Tactical, Rauch Tactical or marstar(all in Canada) or a sadlak nm guide rod (Brownells)
    for extras...... an extended bolt stop/release and extended mag release are very popular upgrades (again Brownells is your friend)
    a decent trigger job by someone who knows what they are doing...... and it's off to the races.



    M14/M305/M1A Test after assembly

    Whenever you take apart your rifle, swap out the stock or trigger or parts, you should conduct a simple test after assembly.

    Firstly, ensure it is unloaded; pull the charging handle to the rear and release. The hammer should be locked to the rear. Place the safety on, and try to pull the trigger. You should not be able to make the hammer release despite moderate pressure. Now take the rifle off safe, pull the trigger...the hammer should be released and make contact with the bolt. Now keeping the trigger pulled to the rear, while pulling the charging handle to the rear and release...keeping the trigger pulled to the rear and hold. The hammer should be caught by the sear and be locked to the rear. Fire the action, keep the trigger to the rear and cycle the action 4 or 5 times again. The hammer should be engaged by the sear initially and remain locked down. Now with the hammer fully back and engaged by the sear....slowly release the trigger, the hammer should come off the sear and be engaged by the trigger. Pull the trigger and the action should fire.

    If at any time the hammer does not engage as noted or fires with the safety on, you have a problem and should not fire your rifle. The problem can be the trigger group parts, the relationship with the stock and the trigger/receiver.

    I bring this up as I have a rather troublesome M305 that will fail this test when I use a number of different stocks. If the sear will not catch the hammer...well lets just say it would be interesting....you could have an out of battery firing or the rifle go full auto.

    More How to's to come including how to do a NM trigger job and to do other goodies just feel free to ask
    Last edited by 50calshooter; 07-26-2012 at 04:27 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member CanuckWR's Avatar
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    Sticky material.
    I <3 10mm auto

  3. #3
    Senior Member Satain's Avatar
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    Yep Good stuff here and well done chalk
    Mod's please chop up chalkriver and my 2 post and combine them please

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    Red Deer Shooting Centre
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satain View Post
    Yep Good stuff here and well done chalk
    Mod's please chop up chalkriver and my 2 post and combine them please
    I merged all that info into one post and did my best at formatting everything to be consistent... Let me know if you want me to change anything...



    And I stickied this thread...
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    Canadian ForcesTransparency Enhancement Facilitator chalkriver's Avatar
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    Here is Hungry and his famous popsicle stick

    Hungry Here: My picture of the popsicle stick (welfare method) of doing this modification. I even left the Popsicle stick so that all of you can see it.... Fill the “dammed” void with the JB Weld and level it off. Clean up any spillage. Acetone is your friend.
    Let cure overnight, or in the case of the 5 min. weld, at least a few hours.
    Remove the cardboard and clean up the area with a file/emery cloth /Scotchbrite pad.
    Fill any voids, etc with glazing putty and sand

    Here are some pics of the selector cutout filling operation, but I used some High Density foam to take up the space and keep things light. In the past I used some pieces of balsa wood or doweling to fit into that space



    More info on rear sights


    Testing rear sights
    Test the rear sight, turn it's windage knob and see if it is snug and the same tension through left to right range. Clicks should be positive and even throughout adjustment.
    Next turn windage all the way to right side and then adjust elevation through its range, observe windage knob, it should not turn or move with elevation adjustment...if it does, this is the waning sign of a faulty windage lock collar.
    Next look at the rear sight base itself, the vertical centerline should be machined center of the base, often its cut too far to the right of center.
    Flash hider, have a good look at it, an out of spec front sight base will be noticeable if you look closely. It could be titled or off center. Rear sights are easily replaced with M1 Garand rear sights (M-14 Doc)


    Rear sight problem?
    Hold elevation knob firmly and insert slot screw driver into windage knob lock collar. Turn collar 1/2 turn, then try normal adjustment of sights. If this procedure fails to produce movement in the sights, my guess is the pinion shaft threads have been stripped and seized.
    Sights that have been seized like this can be exceptionally difficult to remove for replacement.
    To remove, windage must adjusted all the way to the left, then the lock collar can be loosened while holding windage knob itself from turning as you loosen the center collar.
    Once loosened fully the windage knob should pull free with a few turns of the knob to the rear.
    If the windage knob will not release, or if it was difficult to turn the center collar, the pinion shaft has been stripped by the collars lock ring.
    Gentle use of a flat blade screw driver may be needed between receiver ear and windage knob to manipulate the knob as you turn it. This should be done with extreme care as you do not want to bend, crack or damage the windage ear of the receiver

    Replace rear sight with an M1Garand, Springfield or genuine m14 rear sight
    In many case one would only need to replace the elevation knob and pinion assembly and the windage knob. (M-14 Doc)


    Question to the Doc...
    Norc M14 sight adjustment
    ________________________________________
    I was surprised to find that it shoots about 5 or 6 inches to the right at 50 yards. In one case I was printing on the target next to the one I was shooting LOL.
    My front sight seems fine, and as vertical as you would expect on the Norc rifles (lots of front sight off-angle troubles posted in this section.) Index mark (found on the muzzle side of the front sight base) between front sight & sight base is aligned.
    The rear sight is cranked as far "left" as it can go.
    EDIT: the rear sight is cranked in the direction marked "left"
    The rear sight assembly is moved as far to the right as it can go.


    Answer :
    For standard length m14 barrels .008 of and inch movement of the front sight will move POI 1 inch at 100 Yards same is true with shaving down the front sight blade.
    Verify that sight base center mark is machined true to center... A GREAT many norc sight base have the rear sight center mark machined WAY off center.
    If it's ok, next check the aperture, is it drilled on center and more importantly does the hole align with the rear sight base center line
    Once that's established and corrected with properly machined parts.
    Then inspect the flash hider. Does the sight base center align with flash hider splineway
    Does the sight base sit true or is it tilted.
    If tilted, is it caused by an index issue or poor machining of the flash hider?
    Once all these things are addressed, zeroing the rifle should be a snap
    Last edited by chalkriver; 07-27-2012 at 06:41 AM.

  6. #6
    Canadian ForcesTransparency Enhancement Facilitator chalkriver's Avatar
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    Promag Archangel Stock Modification

    The Chinese receivers are a little different than the American ones as the receiver is shaped different along the lower right side.


    To get the stock to fit correctly some material has to be removed from the right side of the stock , it is aprox 6 1/4 inches long and maybe 1/8 to 1/4 inch deep or so and its angled outwards along the length towards the outside of the stock.



    I used a dremel and the end of a file to get the groove cut into the stock and it worked really well.
    Pay close attention to the heel of the receiver area as this needs to be sitting flush ...no gap at the rear and along the sides







    It is very important to go slow and remove a little material at a time and then test fit as you go .

    Some material may have to be removed from under the trigger pads as well to get it to fit correctly and pass the trigger test
    Once again remove just a little material then test fit the receiver and then do the trigger test.



    Note !!! Its very important to do ensure the rifle will pass the trigger test after assembly procedure !!

    Cock the action and engage the safety, test trigger. Release the safety and fire the action. Squeeze and hold the trigger down and then cock the action again. Keeping the trigger squeezed allow the action to go forward and watch for the hammer following the bolt.
    Release the trigger and you should hear a click, squeeze the trigger and it should fire.
    Repeat this a few times to ensure you don’t experience a slam fire.
    Last edited by chalkriver; 07-27-2012 at 06:46 AM.

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    Looks like the O'l Betsy I had issued to me back in 63.
    Last edited by Spence; 03-15-2014 at 10:13 AM.

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    I just bought a norinco m14 and brought it out to the range i managed to get two rounds out of it. Then it would not fire it would click but not fire. Brought it home took apart and turns out the gas piston broke. Is this a common issue and is this gun worth getting the store to replace it or get money back.

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    Canadian ForcesMember Grizz's Avatar
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    Awesome write up!!!!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satain View Post
    How to's of the M14... A Canadian Perspective.
    New M14 owner here, glad to see all this great info!
    Travis Kay
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    CCFR, CSSA, NRA member, are you? In the greater Vancouver area? Drop me a PM

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