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  1. #11
    Senior Member YVRguy's Avatar
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    Aug 2016
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    Vancouver, BC
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    Thanks for the feedback guys. Based on advice here I think I'm going to price out having a gunsmith change the barrel. When my wallet recovers from that I'll buy the Hunter 700 stock and I'll be close to where I want to be with the rifle. Any suggestions for a good gunsmith in the Greater Vancouver area? My go-to gun store is Italian Sports but I'm not sure how much gun smithing they do.

    While I'm waiting for all of that I can occupy myself with this: http://www.gunownersofcanada.ca/show...50-My-First-AR
    "Missed it by that much."

  2. #12
    Industry expert
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    Jun 2014
    Location
    Ontario
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    131
    There’s some good local gunsmiths in the lower mainland and also good barrel manufacturer. You’re making the right decision to rebarrel. A factory rifle won’t shoot as well as a custom job and a heavy barrel as well as heat dissipation barrel harmonics come into play. You can tune for those but your gun will be more forgiving. Not to mention you can now choose whichever cartridge you want to shoot now.

  3. #13
    Member
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    Jan 2019
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    62
    I've got the bull barrel on my Remmy 700 SPS in .223 and it makes a difference when you're shooting target. My Uncle has an older Remmy .223 with the standard barrel and his heats up much faster. The accuracy is noticeably affected once that barrel starts to heat up.

  4. The Following User Liked This Post By RemmyPCR700

    IJ22 (01-16-2019)

  5. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    162
    What sort of target shooting are you thinking about?
    Shoot the rifle; determine if the level of accuracy is acceptable for your purpose.
    A sporter weight barrel will heat up rapidly; for some disciplines, this could be a problem.


    I notice that there is sometimes confusion about terminology - receiver vs action. A receiver is one piece, while an action is a receiver plus all the mechanical bits.

  6. #15
    Senior Member Camo tung's Avatar
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    May 2012
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    Edmonton
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    Split the difference and go with a medium profile barrel.
    "It is an absolute truism that law-abiding, armed citizens pose no threat to other law-abiding citizens."

    Ammo, camo and things that go "blammo".

  7. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    3,820
    Here's a thought. Learn to shoot the thing first. THEN consider a better barrel.

    Target and long range shooting is not just a plunk yourself down behind the rifle and sling lead downrange kind of an activity. It takes practice, A LOT of practice. By the time you get halfway decent at it, you will have burned out that fancy, expensive target barrel. Better to burn out the skinny OEM barrel and then get something better.

    The things you are gonna need to learn to become a decent marksman include:

    The optics and how to adjust for range and wind
    The trigger - breathing and muscle control
    How to properly shoot from a bench - for that you will need a decent rest
    How to shoot prone off a bipod
    How different bullets react to the atmosphere vs their accuracy potential
    You will need a chronograph and ballistics software and to understand the limitations of both and how they relate to the real world


    Becoming a decent marksman takes years and thousands of rounds downrange. Go shoot the rifle you have and learn how it works and how projectiles move in the real world. THEN you will be ready for a target rifle.

  8. #17
    Senior Member
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    Feb 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by RemmyPCR700 View Post
    I've got the bull barrel on my Remmy 700 SPS in .223 and it makes a difference when you're shooting target. My Uncle has an older Remmy .223 with the standard barrel and his heats up much faster. The accuracy is noticeably affected once that barrel starts to heat up.
    This is a problem of internal stresses in the barrel. This can be solved via cryogenic treatment for $100 or so (not sure the going price these days).

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