Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 52
  1. #21
    Senior Member RobertMcC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Nova Scotia.
    Posts
    5,189
    Quote Originally Posted by Comanchero View Post
    I have a fair amount of experience in bullet casting. I started out with a Coleman naphtha camp stove, a 10 pound small Lyman casting pot, and the standard Lyman egg ladle. I use an electric pot now, but still use the ladle since the pouring orifice is fatally plugged.

    The stove, pot, and ladle method works just fine. Scrap candles work great for flux chips, and an old soup spoon works okay to skim off debris and for stirring the tin and antimony back in to the mix.

    An old small 8" cast iron skillet will work okay for pouring ingots, but it will get heavy fast, and it may prove more difficult to skim off the impurities, during the fluxing process. Since I never had huge quantities of lead scrap to work with, I just used the pot. I melted, fluxed, skimmed, and alloyed if needed, and then proceeded directly to bullet casting.

    For ingot processing from a lot of scrap, the skillet and turkey burner seems the popular way to go. Muffin tins work as ingot molds.

    For actual bullet casting, a Lee electric pot will prove to be a better proposition than the camp stove.
    Yeah I plan to get the Lee electric pot when its time to cast. I was surprised how fast it started to melt. Being my first time, It was more to get a feel of the safety, and what to look for.

    23# range scrap goes in.



    6# of gunk



    17# of rough lead ingots.

    When the rich wage war, It's the poor who die.

  2. #22
    Senior Member glockfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    3,299
    for casting (not smelting) i use the 4-20 bottom pour lee pot. couldn't be happier with it. some report on the lee unit dripping like crazy, never had a problem with this factor at all. i got a nice and cheap PID so i get a consistent temp for a perfect temp pour. now i can appreciate a PID unit on my casting pot, i would never cast without it. you can't rely on the lee temp graduation numbers as they're there for reference only. i like my melt to be around 750F.i get the best boolits at that temp. i'm now testing a new hot plate for my brass molds. i like this. you get prefect boolits from the first pour. seems like my brass molds like to be heated at 450celsius .
    Quote Originally Posted by Forbes/Hutton View Post
    I was hoping he would show up and do something useful in front of the cameras. Like beat the flames out with his face.
    Quote Originally Posted by Magi View Post
    This intellectual midget needs to rub the contents of a large tube of PREPARATION H on his ego and then smack himself with the empty tube until he's in a permanent coma. !

  3. #23
    Senior Member RobertMcC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Nova Scotia.
    Posts
    5,189
    SO smelting? I got about 90% of the grits and impurities out.

    Could I fine tune the rest out. When its time to cast in the 4 -20 ?
    When the rich wage war, It's the poor who die.

  4. #24
    Senior Member glockfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    3,299
    Quote Originally Posted by RobertMcC View Post
    SO smelting? I got about 90% of the grits and impurities out.

    Could I fine tune the rest out. When its time to cast in the 4 -20 ?
    when i smelt, i may flux 3 times my pot.in fact when i'm casting ingots ,the moment i add lead to the
    smelting pot i flux. .....i want my lead to be as clean and well stired as possible. when the flux doesn't ignite, i know my lead is quite clean and stable.

    just make sure you removed all the dross (with the laddle) ; when you're left with a shiny and bright melt, you know that your lead is as clean as possible;it,s then good to be moldedm,or to be used for the casting part.

    .....and it,s been a good day for me.i had business in the city, and i'm back with 200lbs of SOWW and COWW. i now have a good stash of ingots (600lbs) ready to cast.
    Quote Originally Posted by Forbes/Hutton View Post
    I was hoping he would show up and do something useful in front of the cameras. Like beat the flames out with his face.
    Quote Originally Posted by Magi View Post
    This intellectual midget needs to rub the contents of a large tube of PREPARATION H on his ego and then smack himself with the empty tube until he's in a permanent coma. !

  5. #25
    Senior Member RobertMcC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Nova Scotia.
    Posts
    5,189
    Quote Originally Posted by glockfan View Post
    when i smelt, i may flux 3 times my pot.in fact when i'm casting ingots ,the moment i add lead to the
    smelting pot i flux. .....i want my lead to be as clean and well stired as possible. when the flux doesn't ignite, i know my lead is quite clean and stable.

    just make sure you removed all the dross (with the laddle) ; when you're left with a shiny and bright melt, you know that your lead is as clean as possible;it,s then good to be moldedm,or to be used for the casting part.

    .....and it,s been a good day for me.i had business in the city, and i'm back with 200lbs of SOWW and COWW. i now have a good stash of ingots (600lbs) ready to cast.
    Can I re melt the ingots I have and clean them more?
    When the rich wage war, It's the poor who die.

  6. #26
    Senior Member glockfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    3,299
    Quote Originally Posted by RobertMcC View Post
    Can I re melt the ingots I have and clean them more?
    yes you can....when you flux and the melt ignite, that means you have impureties in it. when it doesn't ignite, you're good to go. i might flux a 20 lbs pot 3 times before the mix gets cleaned off of all the crap we don't want in there,especially zinc. some WW have zinc in them, you don't want that...the good news is zinc melt at well past 800 F, and lead melt at what 450?....when you see the surface of the melt looking as oatmeal, that is zinc. remove it while it's partly solid floating on top of the melt. try to not let your melt go past 700F,that way you'll avoid problems with unwanted material bonding with the lead.
    Quote Originally Posted by Forbes/Hutton View Post
    I was hoping he would show up and do something useful in front of the cameras. Like beat the flames out with his face.
    Quote Originally Posted by Magi View Post
    This intellectual midget needs to rub the contents of a large tube of PREPARATION H on his ego and then smack himself with the empty tube until he's in a permanent coma. !

  7. #27
    Senior Member RobertMcC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Nova Scotia.
    Posts
    5,189
    Quote Originally Posted by glockfan View Post
    yes you can....when you flux and the melt ignite, that means you have impureties in it. when it doesn't ignite, you're good to go. i might flux a 20 lbs pot 3 times before the mix gets cleaned off of all the crap we don't want in there,especially zinc. some WW have zinc in them, you don't want that...the good news is zinc melt at well past 800 F, and lead melt at what 450?....when you see the surface of the melt looking as oatmeal, that is zinc. remove it while it's partly solid floating on top of the melt. try to not let your melt go past 700F,that way you'll avoid problems with unwanted material bonding with the lead.
    Thanks, yeah I fluxed like twice with saw dust. But I'm thinking trying wax.

    600 F is what lead melts at. The very dity ingot was the bottom of the barrel stuff.
    When the rich wage war, It's the poor who die.

  8. #28
    Senior Member glockfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    3,299
    Quote Originally Posted by RobertMcC View Post
    Thanks, yeah I fluxed like twice with saw dust. But I'm thinking trying wax.

    600 F is what lead melts at. The very dity ingot was the bottom of the barrel stuff.

    you might want to leave some lead on the bottom of the lee 4-20 pot when you're done . it will of course harden but it protect the spout from being ''polluted'' by foreign fragments ,which then gets you drippings. on top of that, the lead left in the pot contains some of the unwanted elements in it,so leaving it there gets you a chance to mix it with the next batch which will be fluxed at one point.

    seems like candle wax is OK, but parafin is better from what i understand. the saw dust has the advantage of ''protecting the melt''' during the casting process, it protect the lead from oxidation. not a big deal because only the top layer of the melt is exposed to ambiant air,but yes saw dust helps in that matter.
    Quote Originally Posted by Forbes/Hutton View Post
    I was hoping he would show up and do something useful in front of the cameras. Like beat the flames out with his face.
    Quote Originally Posted by Magi View Post
    This intellectual midget needs to rub the contents of a large tube of PREPARATION H on his ego and then smack himself with the empty tube until he's in a permanent coma. !

  9. #29
    Member Comanchero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    88
    It is indeed necessary to melt your range scrap in a separate pot to get all of the debris and impurities out, and pour clean ingots before using them in your electric pot.

    Candle wax, paraffin, whatever. It all worked the same for me.

    The smaller Lee electric pots will only hold the smaller ingots produced in the actual ingot molds, or something similar like baking molds.

    Once the orifice in your bottom pour pot is plugged with debris, it may be nearly impossible to remove it. (Ask me how I know.)

    Salvaged roof jacks are a great source of soft lead, as long as they last. Synthetic materials are used now. Roofers sell them for beer money to casters on Kijiji, and elsewhere.

  10. #30
    Senior Member RobertMcC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Nova Scotia.
    Posts
    5,189
    I'm getting range scrap ( indoor range ) Endless supply. Nobody wants to suit up and dig thru it. Plus I do it late at night when nobody will be around. I do work around the club as payment for the lead. Scrub the walls, floor, Replace the backings.

    I think I might need to get a smaller spoon just for the fine stuff.

    Not sure when I'll start actually casting. Still got alot of 9mm I'm going thru.
    When the rich wage war, It's the poor who die.

Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Hunters urged to use non-lead ammo as 7th lead-poisoned eagle found
    By Doug_M in forum Canadian Firearms News, Headlines and Polls
    Replies: 39
    Last Post: 03-17-2017, 10:37 PM
  2. "Barrel burner" CCI Stinger?
    By Bittereinder in forum Rimfire
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 07-20-2016, 11:59 AM
  3. Casting 95 bullets using 7+ pounds of lead
    By tigrr in forum Reloading
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 06-04-2015, 07:57 AM
  4. lead sheeting, any good for casting?
    By Farlsincharge in forum Reloading
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 07-25-2012, 03:27 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •