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  1. #1
    Member Aprilia Man's Avatar
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    Doctors call for stronger firearm laws

    CCFR CSSA BCWF

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    Senior Member tdod101's Avatar
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    They should really stick with sewing up the holes that gangsters create who don't give a rat flying F#!@ about gun laws.

    Millions of people use firearms safely everyday.

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    Smc (02-11-2019)

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    Senior Member Adam X's Avatar
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    I call on Doctors to stop the killing of Babies.

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    Member Aprilia Man's Avatar
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    CCFR CSSA BCWF

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    Smc (02-11-2019)

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    “Canadian Doctors for Protection from Guns says gun violence should be treated as a public health issue in much the same way as road safety and smoking.”https://toronto.citynews.ca/2019/02/...KJbhbi5DqZYG0c
    Road safety you pass a driver course, and for fire arm safety you pass a firearm course.
    To buy cigarettes you produce government issued ID that proves your over 19. For fire arms you produce PAL.

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    Senior Member VooDoo's Avatar
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    Is that the Hippocratic or Hypocrite Oath - I can never remember.
    University of Texas at Austin 2014 Commencement Address - Admiral William H. McRaven
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pxBQLFLei70

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    AddOnArmor (02-14-2019)

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    Senior Member RangeBob's Avatar
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    Senior Member ruger#1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdod101 View Post
    They should really stick with sewing up the holes that gangsters create who don't give a rat flying F#!@ about gun laws.

    Millions of people use firearms safely everyday.
    Ban doctors. They make mistakes, And kill people.


    It doesn't matter whether the gun they have is illegal or not they don't care about laws in the first place. You could make every gun illegal and you would still have these guys armed to the teeth it's not laws against guns we need laws against criminals !

  12. #9
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    Isn't one of the contributing cause in the opiod deaths doctors overperscribing/ being quick to prescribe?

    Males in construction industry are disproportionately represented in BC opioid deaths. Pretty much all start off as patients with a workplace injury and being treated by a doctor. Once the treatment cycle is done the patient is cut loose with no concern by the doctor and addiction.

  13. #10
    Senior Member RangeBob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by can-down
    Oct 5 2011

    Criminal record checks, 28-day waiting periods, the long-gun registry: none has done anything to stem Canadian firearm homicide rates, according to a new study by an emergency-medicine academic.

    “No significant beneficial associations between firearms legislation and homicide or spousal homicide rates were found,” reads the abstract on the study, written by Caillin Langmann, a resident in the division of emergency medicine at McMaster University, and himself a vocal foe of gun-control measures who has argued instead for enhanced social programs to combat the causes of gun violence.
    To be published in an upcoming issue of the peer-reviewed Journal of Interpersonal Violence, the study took Statistics Canada data on Canadian firearm homicides and compared them to three key pieces of Canadian firearms legislation.

    The three pieces of legislation were the 1995 long-gun registry, a 1977 bill that imposed a requirement for criminal records checks and a 1991 bill that imposed mandatory safety training and a 28-day waiting period on firearms purchases.

    Canada’s firearm homicide rate has been in free fall since the 1970s. In 1974, 273 Canadians were murdered with a gun. In 2008, despite having a higher population, guns killed 200 Canadians. Even in the past 15 years, homicides-by-rifle have dropped by 50% and firearm homicides against women have dropped 30% — as opposed to a 16% decline in general female murders.

    But Dr. Langmann’s study attributes Canada’s drop in gun crimes to a richer, older population — rather than any particular piece of gun control. “If people are poorer and there’s less income equality, those are more likely to be associated with an increase in homicides by firearm,” said Dr. Langmann.

    His analysis factored in other variables “associated with criminality,” such as unemployment, incarceration rates, income equality and the population attributed to immigration. The study also factored in the rate of non-firearms homicide rates and allowed multi-year delays for firearms legislation to take effect.

    The team then ran the data through three methods of statistical analysis including Joinpoint, a software program often used to probe the success of cancer interventions.

    All three methods of analysis, wrote Dr. Langmann, “failed to definitively demonstrate an association between firearms legislation and homicide between 1974 and 2008.”

    “We have the same numbers … and we’ve found the opposite,” said Amelie Baillargeon, communications coordinator for the Coalition for Gun Control.

    A Université de Montrčal study published January in the Canadian Journal of Criminology and Justice similarly examined Canadian firearms homicide rates since 1974. The study also factored in external influences such as immigrant populations, the proportion of young men between the ages of 15 and 24 and the per-capita consumption of beer. That study, however, found that Canadian gun legislation was responsible for 5% to 10% drops in firearms homicides.

    Notably, Mr. Langmann’s study also does not cover suicide, which accounts for nearly three-quarters of all firearms-related deaths in Canada. Last year, a Quebec Institute of Health study also using Joinpoint analysis found that male suicide rates declined notably following the introduction of firearms legislation.

    Ms. Baillargeon also noted Dr. Langmann’s history of advocating against gun legislation. In 2010, he took a stand against a Canadian Association of Emergency Room Physicians resolution in support of the registry. “The gun registry has hurt and killed people,” wrote Dr. Langmann in a widely circulated May 2010 letter.

    Dr. Langmann’s Facebook page also notes his membership in the online groups for the National Rifle Association and “Against the Gun Registry.”

    The precise effects of firearms legislation can be difficult to quantify. For instance, studies to examine whether Bill C-51, requiring a criminal records check, had any effect on suicides have produced wildly different results. Early studies showed no effect. A 1993 study from the New Jersey-based Centre for the Study of Suicide found that “restricting easy access to lethal methods of suicide may assist in reducing suicide.” A study from Toronto, meanwhile, found that in the wake of C-51 suicidal individuals had found other, non-firearm ways of killing themselves.

    nationalpost.com/news/canada/gun-control-homicide-rates-not-linked-study

    Quote Originally Posted by Can-down View Post
    A Université de Montrčal study published January in the Canadian Journal of Criminology and Justice similarly examined Canadian firearms homicide rates since 1974. The study also factored in external influences such as immigrant populations, the proportion of young men between the ages of 15 and 24 and the per-capita consumption of beer. That study, however, found that Canadian gun legislation was responsible for 5% to 10% drops in firearms homicides.
    Is that study available anywhere anyone can see it? The Canadian Journal of Criminology and Justice is published 4 times a year, the most recent issue should have just been published and I see from their website its not available online yet, and online they're still calling October 2018 as Current Issue.

    Quote Originally Posted by Can-down View Post
    Last year, a Quebec Institute of Health study also using Joinpoint analysis found that male suicide rates declined notably following the introduction of firearms legislation.
    We've seen that mistake before. A couple of studies, and newspaper articles as recent as 2018, have said that male suicide dropped 1995-1999.
    But licencing didn't start until 2000-2001, and registration didn't start until 2002-2003.
    The safe storage provisions didn't take effect immediately either.
    So how did the Firearms Act's passage affect male suicide rates (with firearm?) before it came into effect?
    Why is it that male suicide by firearm dropped in the USA around the same time? Was the Canadian Firearms Act responsible for that too?
    I wonder if this report, like so many others, skipped the effects of anti-depressant SSRI medication (like prozac) which was widely distributed across North America starting about 1993 and ramping up considerably by 1999. I think there's an obvious causal relationship between increased anti-depressants and suicide rates dropping. Suicide rates in the USA dropped from about 12% to 10.5% over the same time period.







    EDIT

    Oh for crying out loud. Can-down's article was from 2011, which means that my comments in this post about what happened 'last time' were in fact about that study that's mentioned there.

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