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  1. #1
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    Heat your House with a Water Brake Windmill

    Bypasses the need for electric, straight into heating.

    Heat your House with a Water Brake Windmill


    https://www.resilience.org/stories/2...rake-windmill/

    Almost nobody knows that a windmill can produce heat directly.
    The direct alternative for wind power that everybody knows is the old-fashioned windmill, which is at least 2.000 years old. It transferred the rotational energy from its wind rotor directly to the axis of a machine, for example for sawing wood or grinding grain. This old-fashioned approach remains relevant, also in combination with new technology, because it would be three times more energy efficient compared to first converting the energy to electricity, and then back to rotational energy.

  2. #2
    Resident Combine Pilot JustBen's Avatar
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    Interesting concept. Makes sense to me if I was looking for just heat. But electricity is just so darn flexible.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator Rory McCanuck's Avatar
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    One of the smaller early Danish heat generating windmills was officially tested. The Calorius type 37 – which had a rotor diameter of 5 meters and a height of 9 meters – produced 3.5 kilowatt of heat at a wind speed of 11 m/s (a strong breeze, Beaufort 6).
    Ugh, poncy Europeans.

    3.5Kw = 12,000 Btu
    11 m/s = 40 Kph = 25mph
    An old house in cold weather, assume 60 btu/sqft to heat it.

    So, a 17ft fan 30+ feet up in the air, to heat a 200 sqft room?
    Does that work out right?
    Don't blame me, I didn't vote for that clown. Oct 20, '15

  4. The Following User Liked This Post By Rory McCanuck

    SIR VEYOR (06-04-2019)

  5. #4
    The Gunsmithing Moderator blacksmithden's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rory McCanuck View Post
    Ugh, poncy Europeans.

    3.5Kw = 12,000 Btu
    11 m/s = 40 Kph = 25mph
    An old house in cold weather, assume 60 btu/sqft to heat it.

    So, a 17ft fan 30+ feet up in the air, to heat a 200 sqft room?
    Does that work out right?
    Jesus....SOMEBODY got more sleep than me last night. Lol. Over my head at 500 miles per hour.
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  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rory McCanuck View Post
    Ugh, poncy Europeans.

    3.5Kw = 12,000 Btu
    11 m/s = 40 Kph = 25mph
    An old house in cold weather, assume 60 btu/sqft to heat it.

    So, a 17ft fan 30+ feet up in the air, to heat a 200 sqft room?
    Does that work out right?
    12,000 BTU is a small/medium heat/split pump. If it’s used as radiant floor heat, hows it compare?

    For the older drafty Viking houses, the Danes used the old metal registers? How big were those boilers? The oil/wood stove ones I remember from growing up weren’t taking up the whole basement.

    But for SK, MB, and coastal areas, it might cut it. Can LW put up a 30ft windmill at his house?

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    Rory McCanuck (06-04-2019)

  8. #6
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    12 K Btu per second, minute, hour, day?
    We were told he wasn't ready, now we know he will never be!

  9. #7
    Super Moderator Rory McCanuck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIR VEYOR View Post
    12,000 BTU is a small/medium heat/split pump. If it’s used as radiant floor heat, hows it compare?
    Good point, I'd guess the 60 btu/sqft is for heating the air.
    If you heat the water and then send it though the floor to warm it, I'd imagine it would be much more effective.

    Man I'd love to have heated floors, my unheated crawlspace means the floor are actually painful to put your bare feet on when it's -30
    Don't blame me, I didn't vote for that clown. Oct 20, '15

  10. #8
    Senior Member Hidyn's Avatar
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    I hadn't heard of that one before! Thanks for the info! I'm definitely filing that one away for later.
    "You can break the surgical procedure of removing an appendix down into about 30-35 individual steps each of which is not overly complicated or beyond an enthusiastic amateur."

    -Survival and Austere Medicine, 3rd ed.

  11. #9
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    Simplistic I know but the issue with this is that you're generating the most Btu's when your house is losing Btu's at the fastest rate. Canada is blessed with an abundance of "lazy wind", you know, the stuff that goes through buildings instead of around them!
    We were told he wasn't ready, now we know he will never be!

  12. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rory McCanuck View Post
    Good point, I'd guess the 60 btu/sqft is for heating the air.
    If you heat the water and then send it though the floor to warm it, I'd imagine it would be much more effective.

    Man I'd love to have heated floors, my unheated crawlspace means the floor are actually painful to put your bare feet on when it's -30
    That article or another touches on having a thermal mass of water for a steadying influence. They figured like 3 cubes with up to 7 cubes to deal with fluctuations. So radiant heat into a thermal mass would easily accept it, but it might be too big. It did sound like it’s really an individual building scenario.

    But, if you have the wind and space, maybe retrofit the floor? Lots of easy ways do that part. The heating of it was the pricey part. And if you can get it to self circulate, no need for a pump most of the time. Is a warm/hot floor a dealbreaker during summer if it means warm winter toes?

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