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  1. #31
    Senior Member M1917 Enfield's Avatar
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    https://thewalrus.ca/nunavuts-bid-to-end-alcoholism/

    Nunavut’s Bid to End Alcoholism

    Iqaluit now has the only retail alcohol store in the territory. But will better regulation help curb addiction?

    BY TIM EDWARDS
    Published 15:07, Nov. 2, 2017

    IT’S EARLY SEPTEMBER, and dozens of people are gathered outside a building in Nunavut’s capital. They form the only lineup in the city of nearly 8,000 people. On Twitter, residents jokingly warn each other to use the washroom before joining the wait, to bring a book, to dress for the crisp fall air. The mood is “jovial,” according to Kyle Sheppard, a local. Someone set up a barbecue to sell hot dogs to those standing outside. The territory’s finance minister was at the ribbon-cutting ceremony; he bought a twelve-pack of Corona.

    To most people in North America, the opening of a beer and wine store is nothing special. But in Iqaluit, it’s the first instance of retail sales of alcoholic beverages in nearly fifty years. For decades, Nunavut has flirted with prohibition. All communities in the territory, apart from Iqaluit, currently have some sort of constraint on buying alcohol. In four communities, drinks have to be shipped from government-owned warehouses in Rankin Inlet or Iqaluit, or from outside the territory. In fourteen others, alcohol can be purchased only with the approval of a local committee. In the six remaining communities, possessing alcohol is prohibited. This new outlet, owned and operated by the territorial government, is an experiment in storefront sales, making Iqaluit the only community in Nunavut where residents can buy bottles and cans in town.

    The Iqaluit Beer and Wine Store brings the promise of better alcohol consumption to the North: responsible drinkers will face fewer obstacles, problem drinkers will have access to beer instead of hard liquor, and money that might otherwise fund bootleggers will now go to the government. Or, at least, that’s the hope. The store, which is part of a three-year pilot project to reduce the harm of alcohol consumption, came out of a task force struck in 2010. The task force was composed of doctors, RCMP members, former politicians, and other regional representatives, and it released a report in 2012 that recommended an overhaul of Nunavut’s alcohol regulations. Three years later, in a non-binding plebiscite, Iqaluit residents voted in favour of opening a beer and wine store. More communities are sure to follow. It’s an experiment similar to what Canada is doing with marijuana—attempting to replace the black market with one that is regulated and a high-potency product with one that’s more moderate.

    But not everyone is happy about the new venture. Here, the stakes are higher: multiple studies and surveys from the Government of Nunavut and the RCMP link alcohol to the territory’s crime and suicide rates, which are among the highest in Canada. In March 2016, as politicians discussed opening the store in Iqaluit, Paul Okalik, a former premier and then minister of the territory’s health and justice departments, resigned from cabinet in protest. Like some others, he believes the store will only make problems in the territory worse. The last retail alcohol store in Iqaluit closed down in the mid-seventies—then, the city was called Frobisher Bay—after a drunk man ran his snowmobile into a six-year-old boy. “I’ve buried many people,” Mike Gardner, a retired Anglican minister in Iqaluit, said at a public meeting about alcohol sales in 2014. “And the old graveyard would be not even half full—I doubt it’d be a quarter full—if there had been no booze.”
    I live among lots of sheeple and dim witted who like to think they are good Canadians for voting Lieberal

  2. #32
    Senior Member M1917 Enfield's Avatar
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    Instead, according to research gathered by the US government, a host of other issues emerge: higher drug-addiction rates, a switch from beer to spirits in black-market sales, and spikes in violent crime. But experts have never reached absolute consensus. One National Institutes of Health research paper from 2006, for instance, argues that deaths from liver cirrhosis declined steeply during Prohibition in the US, as did arrests for public drunkenness. For decades after Prohibition ended, its tempering effects remained: alcohol consumption didn’t reach pre-prohibition levels until the 1970s, forty years later.

    According to the Nunavut task force’s report, dry communities in Nunavut experience less alcohol-related crime than wet communities. But alcohol abuse has not disappeared. Nearly 95 percent of incidents in the territory involving the RCMP are related to alcohol. An analysis of 1,300 criminal records from the Baffin Correctional Centre showed that 90 to 95 percent of those crimes, too, happened while the perpetrator was drunk. James Morton, a criminal defence lawyer who’s worked in Nunavut for ten years says that usually the problem is binge drinking—the quick consumption of hard liquor. Morton spoke of a case just the day before in which his client and a friend had each consumed a bottle of whisky over the course of a day. “So he was drinking forty ounces of whiskey in eight hours. And that’s not uncommon.”

    The task force’s report cites experts from all around the territory who say that a healthy drinking culture—one that encourages a simple glass of wine or can of beer with dinner—doesn’t exist in Nunavut. In communities where alcohol is prohibited, many young people are introduced to alcohol through the black market. But in new proposed retail stores, customers will need to register for an account and show an ID for every purchase. There will also be daily limits on how much someone can buy. A similar system was implemented in Greenland within the last decade, and after a temporary surge in alcohol-related crime, consumption has gone down.
    I live among lots of sheeple and dim witted who like to think they are good Canadians for voting Lieberal

  3. #33
    Senior Member Waterloomike's Avatar
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    There are no successful prohibitions. Thus penalties.
    Rightful liberty is unobstructed action according to our will within limits drawn around us by the equal rights of others. I do not add 'within the limits of the law' because law is often but the tyrant's will, and always so when it violates the rights of the individual.

    Thomas Jefferson

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    M1917 Enfield (09-12-2019), Scoutertracker (09-12-2019)

  5. #34
    Senior Member M1917 Enfield's Avatar
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    People will always do stupid and irresponsible stuff and governments will always try to have fines and penalties in place to try and either benefit from that behaviour or attempt to somewhat control it.

    The only truly successful law is the law of nature or otherwise known as the law of the jungle.


    quote-in-past-ages-the-law-governing-the-survival-of-the-fittest-roughly-weeded-out-the-less-nik.jpg

    andrew-carnegie-businessman-quote-and-while-the-law-of-competition.jpg

    rudyard-kipling-quote-lbi3b3i.jpg
    I live among lots of sheeple and dim witted who like to think they are good Canadians for voting Lieberal

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