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  1. #21
    Senior Member M1917 Enfield's Avatar
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    https://www.guns.com/news/2019/04/04...l-rounds-video

    MARINES SEEK TO ORDER 2.4 MILLION POLYMER-CASED .50 CAL ROUNDS (VIDEO)

    04/4/19 6:00 AM | by Chris Eger


    Marines-Seek-to-Order-2.4-Million-Polymer-Cased-.50-Cal-Rounds.jpg

    MAC Ammo’s .50-caliber polymer cased rounds weigh in as much as 30 percent less than brass cased equivalents (Photo: Hancock County, Mississippi)


    The Marine Corps announced this week they intend to sole source millions of rounds of polymer-cased ammunition from a specialty ammo maker in Mississippi.

    The solicitation, posted Monday, is for up to 2.4 million rounds of .50-caliber BMG machine gun ammunition over a three year period from MAC Ammunition in Bay St. Louis. Established in 2007, MAC has been developing lightweight ammo, ranging from 5.56mm to .50 caliber, for the military ever since.

    Their .50-caliber round uses an advanced polymer caselet over a metal cap to reduce ammo weight by as much as 30 percent and provide cooler chamber temperatures, ejecting cool-to-the-touch cases. In real terms, this allows 499 rounds of polymer-cased MAC A-50 to weigh the same amount– 100-pounds– as 401 rounds of M33 ball. According to the company, no modifications are necessary in weapons or procedures. when using their polymer-cased cartridges.



    The Pentagon has long been interested in trimming the weight from traditional brass-cased ammo. One long-running project, spearheaded by defense giant Textron, is the Lightweight Small Arms Technology program for the Army. LSAT uses 5.56 mm and 7.62 mm cased telescoped rounds as well as 5.56 mm caseless and has been underway in one form or another since 2004.
    I live among lots of sheeple and dim witted who like to think they are good Canadians for voting Lieberal

  2. #22
    Senior Member M1917 Enfield's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug_M View Post
    Sure, but with that thin barrel it needs a quick release system for barrel changes.
    Sure, but I remember the amount of stoppages from the mags never caused the barrels to heat up too much for me.
    Last edited by M1917 Enfield; 09-11-2019 at 04:36 PM.
    I live among lots of sheeple and dim witted who like to think they are good Canadians for voting Lieberal

  3. #23
    Senior Member Doug_M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by M1917 Enfield View Post
    Sure, but I remember the amount of stoppages from the mags never caused the barrels to heat up too much for me.
    No doubt. I wasn’t trying to say the C2 was better, I was saying this looks as bad.
    Make the Afghanistan War Memorial publicly accessible https://afghanistanwarmemorial.ca/
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  4. #24
    Canadian ForcesMember srdiver's Avatar
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    this is the same concept that was tried ten years ago - worked in theory but coefficient of expansion and not being able to work in all weather temperature extremes is what put it on the back burner

  5. #25
    Senior Member M1917 Enfield's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug_M View Post
    No doubt. I wasn’t trying to say the C2 was better, I was saying this looks as bad.
    Yeah, they were not a great idea for a LMG, even a much older Bren gun was a far better LMG.
    I live among lots of sheeple and dim witted who like to think they are good Canadians for voting Lieberal

  6. #26
    Super Moderator Rory McCanuck's Avatar
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    I notice that they're careful not to say anything about meaningful specs.
    What does this thing do in language that we'd understand?
    A 270/08? A 110-130gr about 2800-3000fps-ish?
    That would be a very practical and effective round in my eyes.
    Don't blame me, I didn't vote for that clown. Oct 20, '15

  7. #27
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    We won’t get them in Canada in the civilian market. If you had these cartridges and a glock you would become invisible and could walk through any airport metal detector. OMG, THINK OF THE CHILDREN!!
    What country can preserve its liberties if their rulers are not warned from time to time that their people preserve the spirit of resistance. Let them take arms."
    - Thomas Jefferson, letter to James Madison, December 20, 1787

  8. The Following 2 Users Like This Post By Swingerguy

    M1917 Enfield (09-11-2019), Rory McCanuck (09-12-2019)

  9. #28
    Senior Member M1917 Enfield's Avatar
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    You may not have heard, but late last year it was decided that the United States army would be ditching the traditional 5.56x45mm NATO and 7.62x51mm NATO rounds for an entirely new caliber in the form of the 6.8mm.

    While we don’t know much about the 6.8mm so far, we do know that it is designed as a compromise between the virtues of both the 5.56 and 7.62 rounds. There are big concerns among Army officials that the 5.56 round will not be strong enough to penetrate the body armor worn by soldiers in the Russian Army.

    According to Colonel Geoffrey A. Norman, the Force Development Division Chief at Army Headquarters, the 7.62 has too much mass without enough propellant, while the 5.56 simply does not have the mass to penetrate through the body armor. As a result, it makes sense to switch to a new caliber that both has sufficient propellant and enough mass to break through Russian body armor.

    Furthermore, most of the combat overseas in Afghanistan has shifted from dense urban towns to sprawled out open areas in the mountains, where US troops are forced to engage hostile targets at long distances, and where the power of the 5.56 ammunition is drastically reduced.

    Something we do know about the new 6.8mm army caliber is that the recoil is significantly more than that of the 5.56 (due to the fact that it is a larger bullet), so periods of sustained fire will be more difficult.

    NOTE: the Army-issue 6.8mm will be an entirely new caliber, and will not be the existing 6.8 SPC.

    The new and still classified 6.8mm ammunition will be eventually made at a manufacturing facility called Lake City Army Ammunition Plant in the state of Missouri. This plant currently produces roughly 90% of all small arms ammunition for the Department of Defense, which comes out to around one and a half billion rounds a year. A new building will be constructed at the facility specifically for the purpose of manufacturing the new ammunition, the first new building at the facility in over half a century.

    That’s also not to mention that the Army will be seeing a change in their issued firearms as well. A new infantry carbine and squad support weapon will be designed to replace the existing M4 and M249 SAW platforms. The Army wants both of the new weapons to fire the same 6.8mm ammunition, and also to accept the same magazines. The new carbine is said to share several features with the existing AR-15/M4 platform, but will for the most part be a new weapon.

    This summer, several companies will submit prototypes of the new 6.8mm weapons to the army for testing. The army is expecting there to be a more than two year period of development, with production expecting to begin around 2021. The army plans to purchase at least 250,000 new 6.8mm firearms over the next decade after that, which will come out to around $150 million a year.

    The new 6.8mm ammunition will have a lot of roles to fill, because it will need to be used as both a close range and long range caliber. It remains unclear as to whether the 6.8mm will be utilized as a sniper’s weapon, but the army has recently adopted an entirely new long range sniper rifle chambered for 7.62x51mm.

    Recently, the Army decided the 5.56 round was not going to cut it against modern body armor, particularly that worn by Russian Army troops. The service called for a larger, heavier round that could penetrate current and future body armors, but at the time, the service was kind of elusive about what exactly that caliber would be. The new round is also expected to be accurate to greater ranges.

    Now, we know the answer: The Army is bumping up to 6.8mm, adding more than a millimeter in diameter. This is close to the caliber the Army fielded in the early 1960s, the 7.62x51 round. The older round features considerably greater recoil than 5.56, making it more difficult to deliver rounds accurately in automatic fire. The 6.8 is an attempt to reach a compromise between the two.

    According to the Prototype Opportunity Notice posted online, the Army wants the new weapons to fire in semi-automatic and fully automatic modes and share the same ammunition magazine. They must include a flash hider for minimizing muzzle blast at night time, a removable sound suppressor, and a carry sling. The weapons must be resistant to rust, scratches, chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons, electromagnetic pulse, and cyber attacks (something for the contractors to keep in mind if the weapon is electrically controlled), and must come in some shade of Coyote, a shade of brown popular with the U.S. military. They must function in “all environments and weather conditions” and come equipped with a so-called “Picatinny rail” for mounting of optics, aiming lasers, and other weapon enhancements.

    The Army Contracting Command is seeking information from industry on possible initial manufacture, inspect and delivery of advanced lightweight 6.8mm ammunition to use with Army’s next standard-issue rifle, according to a request for information released on Jul 08.

    Sources familiar with the matter say the new design of 6.8mm round promises to have better range, improved accuracy at longer distances, and greater armor penetration capability over the existing 5.56x45mm ammunition the service uses now.

    The 6.8mm Projectiles, projectile components, and tooling for testing components shall be produced and accepted to Government provided detailed government classified drawings.

    According to recent notice, approved Vendor must demonstrate the ability to manufacture metal injection molded and machined 6.8mm projectile components, components into completed projectiles, design and manufacture custom tooling, and cut/grind heavy metals such as tungsten carbide as well as build custom fabrication processes for any non-standard but similar Government designs.

    EDz2oc9XoAAMd6Q.jpg
    I live among lots of sheeple and dim witted who like to think they are good Canadians for voting Lieberal

  10. #29
    Senior Member Doug_M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by M1917 Enfield View Post
    Yeah, they were not a great idea for a LMG, even a much older Bren gun was a far better LMG.
    I still loved lugging it around though. 'cause I was young and stupid and didn't know better existed lol. But then I got my MG course and met the beauty that is the C6. To be a "machine gunner" is why I joined in the first place. Well worth it (the brotherhood of the combat arms and the Regimental system, plus discipline, pride in work etc were also well worth it). Still have a fondness for the C2 but I now recognize it for the piece of poop it was. I remember on an ex (with blanks) a friends C2 blew the gas piston right out the front. The gas piston tube right before the gas adjustment cracked and that whole chunk went flying with the piston.
    Make the Afghanistan War Memorial publicly accessible https://afghanistanwarmemorial.ca/
    Don't let the public forget about #LAVSCAM https://lavscam.info

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  12. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug_M View Post
    I still loved lugging it around though. 'cause I was young and stupid and didn't know better existed lol. But then I got my MG course and met the beauty that is the C6. To be a "machine gunner" is why I joined in the first place. Well worth it (the brotherhood of the combat arms and the Regimental system, plus discipline, pride in work etc were also well worth it). Still have a fondness for the C2 but I now recognize it for the piece of poop it was. I remember on an ex (with blanks) a friends C2 blew the gas piston right out the front. The gas piston tube right before the gas adjustment cracked and that whole chunk went flying with the piston.
    New C6s are coming, with synthetic stocks, rails, etc. I'd love to see at least 2 per platoon in the infantry context, or even more. And yes, I've carried one, it was heavy and annoying, plus you needed to have a secondary weapon on top of it, but still it is awesome. The C9s are jam-o-matic.

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