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  1. #1
    Member awndray's Avatar
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    H&R Ultra Light Slug Hunter 20 ga Value

    How much does a very good condition example go for these days? Since they're out of production and people tend to want to hold onto them, it's tricky to find a price.

  2. #2
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    I honestly don’t know, but I’ve got $30 or $40 bucks.
    Just a joke.
    What country can preserve its liberties if their rulers are not warned from time to time that their people preserve the spirit of resistance. Let them take arms."
    - Thomas Jefferson, letter to James Madison, December 20, 1787

  3. #3
    Moderator kennymo's Avatar
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    Not sure about the shotguns. Some people are asking a premium for the H&R rifles, but I think that’ll go down if the Henry single shots gain popularity.
    Cleverly disguised as a responsible adult.

  4. #4
    One Mile Mentor tigrr's Avatar
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    In excellent condition $350 for shotguns $500 for some caliber rifles.
    The challenge of retirement is how to spend time without spending money.
    There is no place in an anti's head where reason can enter. from a Napoleon saying with a tweak.
    Look around is there someone you can introduce to shooting because that’s the only way we will buck the anti gun trend sweeping Canada! "tigrr 2006"

  5. #5
    Go Canucks Go! lone-wolf's Avatar
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    If I was selling my non-slug H&R 20ga tamer, $250 would be the lowest I'd take. I really like the little shotgun.
    the wild still lingered in him and the wolf in him merely slept

    "It must be poor life that achieves freedom from fear" - Aldo Leopold

  6. #6
    Senior Member M1917 Enfield's Avatar
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    I recently acquired a very nice NEF (pre H&R) 20 gauge with scope mount base already fitted for $200 total!

    Still has all it's colour case hardening finish on the receiver too.

    I plan to use it for slugs and deer hunting.

    It's serial number denotes it was made in 1992.

    I see them relatively often for around $150 for a rough but serviceable one and up to $300 for a excellent condition one.
    I live among lots of sheeple and dim witted who like to think they are good Canadians for voting Lieberal

  7. #7
    Senior Member Gunexpert007's Avatar
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    Is a 20 ga H/R slug hunter worth more than a 12ga slug hunter , or about the same ?
    " Better To Fight For Something , Than Live For Nothing " ; " When In Doubt....ATTACK ".......Gen. George S. Patton Jr.

  8. #8
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    "...premium for the H&R rifles..." Some people think that just because a particular firearm is discontinued it becomes a collector piece and its value automatically increases. They do not. Don't think there is such a thing as an H&R collector.

  9. #9
    Resident Combine Pilot JustBen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Justice View Post
    "...premium for the H&R rifles..." Some people think that just because a particular firearm is discontinued it becomes a collector piece and its value automatically increases. They do not. Don't think there is such a thing as an H&R collector.
    For once, I wholeheartedly agree.

  10. #10
    Senior Member M1917 Enfield's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Justice View Post
    "...premium for the H&R rifles..." Some people think that just because a particular firearm is discontinued it becomes a collector piece and its value automatically increases. They do not. Don't think there is such a thing as an H&R collector.
    They made millions of them too over the span of at least 3 separately owned firearms companies under the trading names of Harrington & Richardson, New England Firearms and then by H&R 1871 LLC during a time period from about the mid to late 1800's until 2015.

    Even when still being made they sold new in the box for under $300 USD and appealed mainly to the youth or economy sector of the firearms marketplace.

    The New England Firearms company had been around for nearly 150 years. The original company was founded in 1871 by Frank Wesson (brother of Daniel Wesson of Smith & Wesson) and Nathan Harrington, but the partnership didn’t last too long. Harrington then teamed up with William Richardson, and together they formed H&R.

    The original H&R (Harrington and Richardson) Firearms business went belly-up in 1986. Their assets were liquidated and their building was torn down. In 1991, however, a new company by the name of ‘H&R 1871’ was formed, and – using the original H&R Firearms and New England Firearms designs – the new business began to produce several different types of weapons under the H&R banner, which also included New England Firearms.

    In the year 2000, H&R 1871 was purchased by Marlin Firearms, which effectively took over all New England Firearms and H&R brands, patents and trademarks. In 2007, Remington Arms Company purchased Marlin Firearms, and made it – and its subsidiaries – part of the Remington Outdoor Company, formerly known as Freedom Group.

    In February of 2015, Remington put a stopper to the H&R 1871’s production lines as they were competing too much with the Remington line of economy firearms that had a higher profit margin.

    In their prime, New England Firearms and H&R were providing the world with top-of-the-line single-shot weapons. They were an integral part of the firearms industry, they helped to sustain and advance the world of single-shot firearms.

    These single shot firearms were always a cheap but very serviceable firearm for the masses who could not afford anything better or a repeater firearm. I doubt they will ever command much more than any other firearm of a similar configuration.

    The most I would pay for a excellent example would be $400, Maybe up to $500 for a walnut stocked .45-70 Buffalo Hunter in excellent condition.
    I live among lots of sheeple and dim witted who like to think they are good Canadians for voting Lieberal

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