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  1. #1
    Senior Member labradort's Avatar
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    Bore not gleaming on Browning 1911-22

    I've had some issues with excessive lead fouling on my 1911-22 by Browning. I bought it used, so no idea how many rounds have gone down or how the previous owner cleaned it. It was sent to Browning to be checked, and the note came back saying "use standard velocity ammo".

    I learned about JB bore paste and VFG Bore Pellet combination in a youtube video. Many claims online about it bringing back accuracy with older firearms. I've been to the range a few times and done some scrubbing with the paste and pellet combo.

    I've also tried bore paste and pellet scrub on my Ruger 10/22.

    Here is what I notice different:

    1. After cleaning is complete, Ruger's barrel gleams like silver when there is a bore light shone into the chamber, even indirect light. Browning's barrel is always grey - looks smooth and clean, but grey.

    2. After the bore paste is not being put on the bore pellet, scrubbing the bore with a dry pellet results in a black pellet from the Browning, and a grey pellet from the Ruger. Yeah, even 5 dry pellets later, the Browning is making a white pellet black (scrubbing action).

    I don't have another Browning 1911-22 to compare. Is it normal for the bore to look grey compared with other makes?

    The process I've followed is:

    1. Presoak bore a couple of minutes with G96.
    2. Brass bore brush with G96 two or three times
    3. Three to Five uses of bore pellet scrubbing with JB paste until pellet seems totally coked up black and unable to absorb more dirt (like a dirty mop)
    4. Continuous scrubbing with fresh pellets and no paste until pellets seem to come out clean (never reach that with 1911-22) - can be from 4 to 10 pellets for this stage
    5. More G96 to wash out any remaining paste, with patches.

  2. #2
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    It's a 22 plinker, shoot it until you can't hit what you're aiming at and then run a patch through it.
    I'm here because all the smart people keep getting banned on the other site.

  3. #3
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    Does it shoot decently well?

    May more 22 rimfire barrels have been ruined by excessive or incorrect cleaning than have ever been shot out.

  4. #4
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    Just checked mine, at first it looked gray, but turns out it just hadn't been cleaned.
    A couple of runs with a wet patch then a couple with a dry patch it came out to a mirror finish.

  5. #5
    Senior Member labradort's Avatar
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    Thanks IJ22. So if you compare with another 22, is the metal as bright?

    I didn't start with extreme cleaning. I started with a gun that was shooting inaccurately, and I was cleaning it with only a couple of passes of the bore brush plus patch. Three times in a row after shooting less than 100 rounds at the range, I was getting huge slivers of lead coming out of it. After trying to clean it with more efforts and not getting a different result, I sent it to Browning.

    Here is a photo of the lead from one cleaning, using just a bore brush, and with less than 100 rounds of CCI copper plated round nose.
    This was several months ago before it was sent to Browning.

    IMG_0387.jpg

    I think I am still getting some lead like this today using the JB paste, but it is harder to identify the shiny part of the paste from shiny lead on the pellet.

    The JB Paste is shown in this Brownells video.



    The only difference is I don't use Kroil. So I wouldn't think cleaning has damaged the bore.

    Everyone I've had shooting this 1911-22 finds my CZ-75 far more accurate, including myself. Browning describes the barrel as "target crown" so I think it might be a notch above "plinker". It's a Black Label.

  6. #6
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    I don't have a lifetime of experience but it looks as shiny as any I've seen - mirror finish is the best way I can think of to describe it. It's my wife's gun so I don't have a lot of experience with it, but from what I recall it is very accurate, and extremely reliable, failures are extremely rare. In fact I can't explicitly remember if it even has ever failed. Shoots it's way through anything. Unlike my jam-o-matic Sig 1911-22

  7. #7
    Senior Member labradort's Avatar
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    Oh yeah, it is very reliable. No problems with that on mine, although I'm not sure what would happen if I went 500 rounds before cleaning out the lead.

    So there is something dull about the bore metal. It was like that before the bore paste application as well, although I believed the paste helped a little. Side by side with anything else I own, that barrel bore is smooth grey, not mirror.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Mark-II's Avatar
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    I don’t know if they make one in .22 but a Lewis Lead Remover is a pretty aggressive tool that I’ve used to clean larger bore pistol barrels that have visible leading. I’ve not really tried the JB paste, though I have some
    Schrödinger's Gat - The logical paradox which posits that a firearm, stored safe in the home, is at the same time On The Streets

  9. The Following User Liked This Post By Mark-II

    Suputin (10-13-2019)

  10. #9
    Super Moderator Rory McCanuck's Avatar
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    I've used hydrogen peroxide and vinegar to remove ancient lead deposits.
    I'm not sure how well it worked, but it pulled a bunch of crud out.
    Some of it might have been barrel, not sure?
    Sharpshootr's WipeOut cleaned it the rest of the way and left is sparkling clean.
    I'm not sure it would have before the H2O2/Vinegar mix.
    Straight peroxide will give you hairs in your bore, when you examine the patch, it's all rust.
    Don't blame me, I didn't vote for that clown. Oct 20, '15

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rory McCanuck View Post
    I've used hydrogen peroxide and vinegar to remove ancient lead deposits.
    I'm not sure how well it worked, but it pulled a bunch of crud out.
    Some of it might have been barrel, not sure?
    Sharpshootr's WipeOut cleaned it the rest of the way and left is sparkling clean.
    I'm not sure it would have before the H2O2/Vinegar mix.
    Straight peroxide will give you hairs in your bore, when you examine the patch, it's all rust.
    You want to be VERY careful using the peroxide-vinegar solution as it results in a highly toxic lead solution that is capable of crossing the skin barrier. Simply getting a bit of it on your skin can result in lead toxicity in your body.

  12. The Following 2 Users Like This Post By Suputin

    Rory McCanuck (10-14-2019), Stew (11-06-2019)

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