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  1. #11
    Moderator kennymo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Junckopolo View Post
    Very beautifgul weapon. I like how it looks. My friend and me started looking for WW1 ross rifles for CEF reenactment, so the Mk3. Any idea the average I can ask for a WTB on the internet? Or any working "replica"?
    As I said somewhere else, I haven’t seen a full military Ross for under $1000 for quite some time. Last one was $1200 or $1300 at a dealer who’s generally fairly reasonable with his milsurp pricing. Sporterized ones can still be had reasonably cheap I think.... Some guys are asking pretty hefty amounts for sporterized Lee Enfields now though, hoping to play on the current interest in restoring them.
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  2. #12
    Junior Member Junckopolo's Avatar
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    So sporterized ones would be cheaper and could be restored? That would be a nice project.

    Too bad the guy making replicas won't sell them. Remaking old weapons like these is a market I haven't really seen but would really be working I think.

  3. #13
    Moderator kennymo's Avatar
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    Restoration parts for a Ross rifle are not very easy to come by unfortunately. There weren’t millions upon millions built over many decades with warehouses full of spare bits like the Lee Enfields and Mausers.
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  4. #14
    Junior Member Junckopolo's Avatar
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    Does a sporterized have anything else different other than the stock? A stock might be manageable to make if all the mechanism is the same.

  5. #15
    Moderator kennymo's Avatar
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    Sometimes the barrels were cut and recrowned. I’ve had several Lee Enfields with an inch or two removed. There’s also a number of metal bits to think about, bayonet lug, hardware for the handguard, barrel bands, etc, etc....
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  6. #16
    Junior Member Junckopolo's Avatar
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    Alright, thank you! I will try to find one still in the military style. It will suit me better.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Petamocto's Avatar
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    I have always preferred the Ross over the Enfield, and no it was not just a "range only rifle".

    The thing was awesome, except for a very stupidly engineered part that could be installed backwards, resulting it in not being able to full chamber a round (bye bye face).

    By the time it was fixed, the rumour had spread that it was garbage, unfortunately.

    It really is too bad, because it's a thing of beauty. I really enjoy old engineering, and it's amazing to do a straight pull on a bolt action rifle and see how the action spirals around.

    The above comments are right about the brass, though, good luck with 280 Ross brass, because most Ross fans have already horded it all.

    I'm not sure if one could be converted to 308 or some other modern calibre, I'm sure more than a few have pulled it off.
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  8. #18
    Moderator kennymo's Avatar
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    The thing was awesome, except for a very stupidly engineered part that could be installed backwards, resulting it in not being able to full chamber a round (bye bye face).
    It seems like there was very little evidence that this had actually happened to soldiers in the field. Possibly one or two cases, but there is a visible difference in the closed action with the bolt head installed upside down.

    The worse problem was British manufactured 303 ammunition in the early years of the war. They issued contracts to anyone remotely capable of turning out rounds, and lowered their acceptance standards to keep the front lines supplied. Canadian produced ammunition was of excellent quality, so much so that the British promptly confiscated it all for use in machine guns and supplied Canadian troops with the stuff that was too wonky to cycle in a Vickers gun. The British had issues with it in the SMLE as well, but started over boring their chambers so fewer rounds would stick after firing. This was eventually done in the field to many of the Ross rifles, but the lack of primary extraction meant they still suffered from many more jams than a LE. Several vets had been quoted as well didn’t have any trouble with the rifles until we got THAT ammunition’. Smellie (local Manitoban war historian) had done a lot of digging into the issue, and even came up with a lot number for a batch of ammunition that was particularly bad, and was unfortunately issued to the Canadian lines right before the second battle of Ypres, which was where the habit of the troops recovering SMLE’s from no man’s land likely became common. Anyway, the poor quality ammunition likely gave rise to ‘the Ross is no good in the mud’ legend, which is only partly true, it was a bit sensitive to lack of maintenance, but out of spec brass and excessive pressure were worse.

    The final version of the Ross was a very strong action. The 280 Ross was pretty stout for it’s day, and quite a few were rebarrelled to various potent sporting cartridges. Rumour has it that Ross had built some in 450 Nitro Express, but I’m not sure if any survive.

    Interestingly, after it was taken out of Canadian service in 1916, the British contracted the Ross factory to produce rifles for their Naval troops to free up SMLE’s for the front lines. These wound up being mothballed after the war, and were hauled out of the cosmoline at the outbreak of WWII. You can still find a few around with British Home Guard markings from that time. Others went (again) to the Navy and various second line troops.
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  9. #19
    Junior Member Junckopolo's Avatar
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    Any of you would know where best to start looking for one gun so rare?

  10. #20
    Moderator kennymo's Avatar
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    P&S Militaria gets one through occasionally. I’m pretty sure SFRC had one or two pass through the doors as well. Collectors Source might be worth keeping an eye on, but their prices tend to be a little high on a lot of things. Might luck out at a gun show?
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