Page 24 of 24 FirstFirst ... 142021222324
Results 231 to 238 of 238
  1. #231
    Member awndray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    National Capital Region
    Posts
    13,040
    I could have sworn my wife's forestry colleague told me it's Manitoba Maple (acer negundo, or box-elder maple, or ash-leaf maple).

    https://www.inaturalist.org/guide_taxa/873085
    https://www.uoguelph.ca/arboretum/th.../manitobamaple

    Here are the buds.

    20210419_192045.jpg

  2. #232
    Moderator kennymo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Winnipeg, MB
    Posts
    13,575
    We have piles of the so called ‘Manitoba’ Maples at the farm. Leaves don’t quite look flag like, they turn soft, punky and often hollow with age and size. Best used to fall on buildings to up your insurance premiums.
    Cleverly disguised as a responsible adult.

  3. The Following 4 Users Like This Post By kennymo

    Camo tung (04-19-2021), M1917 Enfield (04-19-2021), R&R Rancher (04-20-2021), Rory McCanuck (04-20-2021)

  4. #233
    Senior Member M1917 Enfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Eastern Ontario
    Posts
    11,138
    Quote Originally Posted by awndray View Post
    I could have sworn my wife's forestry colleague told me it's Manitoba Maple (acer negundo, or box-elder maple, or ash-leaf maple).

    https://www.inaturalist.org/guide_taxa/873085
    https://www.uoguelph.ca/arboretum/th.../manitobamaple

    Here are the buds.

    20210419_192045.jpg
    Oh, okay, I have a Manitoba Maple in my yard, It is already about 60 foot high and only 11 years old and I have cut numerous branches off as it grows super fast. It is not a true maple like the type we get syrup from and use for hardwood flooring. The wood is pretty crappy and not even fit for firewood. It is classed as a pest species in some places and is also known as Box Elder. The timber is a light, close-grained, softwood and is considered undesirable for most commercial uses, this tree has been considered as a source of wood fiber, for use in making fiberboard or cardboard.

    The leaves look like this -





    The wood shows a red heartwood when cut -


    Warning! some sarcasm, facetious behavior, satire, irony, dry humor, playful banter and more may or may not be involved in my postings. Please read anything I have written as being said in the most joyful and happy voice you can imagine.

    To whom it may concern: I hereby declare I am not responsible for the debts incurred by one Justin Trudeau!

  5. #234
    Member awndray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    National Capital Region
    Posts
    13,040
    Ah! Good to know. I have a bunch of that crap around the house, among the "real" maples that the neighbor taps every year.

    signal-2021-04-04-113135.jpg

  6. #235
    Moderator kennymo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Winnipeg, MB
    Posts
    13,575
    It is not a true maple like the type we get syrup from
    I’m told the old timer who owned the farm prior to my parents used to tap a few of them in the spring and make a passable syrup. When we were kids, we’d snap some small branches off in the early spring so sweet tasting icicles would form. Maybe where they got the ‘maple’ moniker?
    Cleverly disguised as a responsible adult.

  7. #236
    The Gunsmithing Moderator blacksmithden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    I live among the creatures of the night (Edmonton)
    Posts
    17,829
    Manitoba maple buds. I just pulled that off one. I let 2 of them grow beside my deck. Fast growing. Good for privacy. They pop up here so much people cut them off as quick as they can. Theyre considered a weed and theyre damned near impossible to kill of you let them get a decent start. Keep them cut back and they wont crush your house when they decide to fall over or break off a huge branch without warning. The one in rottweilerboy's front yard is like a magnet for lightening. It gets hit every couple of years but it just keeps coming back.

    20210419_192430.jpg
    GOC moderator
    Dealer/co-founder/co-owner of Tundra Supply Ltd.
    www.tundrasupply.ca
    June 2013 - The High River Gun Grab - NEVER FORGET !!!!
    Feb 26 2014 - Swiss Arms prohibition and ordered confiscation by the RCMP - NEVER FORGET !!!!!
    May 1 2020 - Liberal un-democratic mass prohibition order in council. - NEVER FORGET !!!!!

  8. #237
    The Gunsmithing Moderator blacksmithden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    I live among the creatures of the night (Edmonton)
    Posts
    17,829
    It's not mine. I saw it on another site. The guy said somebody was offering it to him for 25 bucks. Hell...I'd take it for that just to have on hand for when I overpower a burglar. Tie them up...blind ford them...put their leg in it, and take off the blindfold. LOL.

    Tree sheer.jpg
    GOC moderator
    Dealer/co-founder/co-owner of Tundra Supply Ltd.
    www.tundrasupply.ca
    June 2013 - The High River Gun Grab - NEVER FORGET !!!!
    Feb 26 2014 - Swiss Arms prohibition and ordered confiscation by the RCMP - NEVER FORGET !!!!!
    May 1 2020 - Liberal un-democratic mass prohibition order in council. - NEVER FORGET !!!!!

  9. The Following 3 Users Like This Post By blacksmithden

    Dewey Cox (04-19-2021), Hillbillyreefer (04-19-2021), Rory McCanuck (04-20-2021)

  10. #238
    Senior Member M1917 Enfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Eastern Ontario
    Posts
    11,138
    Quote Originally Posted by kennymo View Post
    I’m told the old timer who owned the farm prior to my parents used to tap a few of them in the spring and make a passable syrup. When we were kids, we’d snap some small branches off in the early spring so sweet tasting icicles would form. Maybe where they got the ‘maple’ moniker?
    Apparently in the past the Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache Indians used dry scrapings of the inner bark and keep it as winter food, and they would also boil the inner bark until sugar crystallizes out of it. The Cheyenne would mix the boiled sap with shavings from the inner sides of animal hides and eat them as candy. The Ojibwa would mix the sap with that of the sugar maple (syrup) and drink it as a beverage.

    Just don't eat the buds, leaves and seeds -

    A protoxin present in the seeds of Acer negundo (Manitoba Maple), hypoglycin A, has been identified as a major risk factor for, and possibly the cause of, a disease in horses, seasonal pasture myopathy (SPM). SPM is an equine neurological disease which occurs seasonally in certain areas of North America and Europe, with symptoms including stiffness, difficulty walking or standing, dark urine and eventually breathing rapidly and becoming recumbent. Ingestion of sufficient quantities of box elder seeds, leaves or other parts of the plant results in breakdown of respiratory, postural, and cardiac muscles. The cause of SPM was unknown for centuries despite the disease being well known among affected areas and was only positively determined in the 21st century. It is analogous to Jamaican vomiting sickness in humans, also caused by hypoglycin A.

    Although its weak wood, irregular form, and prolific seeding might make it seem like a poor choice for a landscape tree it often is used as one.
    Warning! some sarcasm, facetious behavior, satire, irony, dry humor, playful banter and more may or may not be involved in my postings. Please read anything I have written as being said in the most joyful and happy voice you can imagine.

    To whom it may concern: I hereby declare I am not responsible for the debts incurred by one Justin Trudeau!

Page 24 of 24 FirstFirst ... 142021222324

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •