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  1. #11
    Senior Member RangeBob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blacksmithden View Post
    See: England, the disasterous failed attempt to.....
    I've got details. I've got details.

  2. #12
    Senior Member CLW .45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suputin View Post
    What happens when they manage to achieve a ban and gun crime and violence actually increases?
    What happens?

    As before - more bans!
    To show that men can travel to the moon and return, use the American experience.

    To show that public safety isn’t hurt by responsible individuals carrying to protect life, use the American experience.

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    Waynetheman (11-16-2019)

  4. #13
    Senior Member Doug_M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CLW .45 View Post
    What happens?

    As before - more bans!
    Exactly! This isn’t new. We’ve been here many times before. C-71 just banned 15,000 “assault weapons”.

    “We need to ban these guns for the public good.”

    ...time...more criminal violence

    “We need to ban these guns for the public good.”

    and on and on it goes.
    Dictionary of the future:
    Global Warming was a popular computer simulation game,
    where the only way to win was not to play.

  5. #14
    Senior Member linung's Avatar
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    This is why we have Terminator.

    pretty soon they gonna realize that people is the problem and instead of trying to punish the criminal, they're gonna do a judgement day.



    Free the Guns! so we can shoot back.
    Memeber of CSSA, OFAH



    More Shooting! Less Posting!

  6. #15
    Senior Member CLW .45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug_M View Post
    Exactly! This isn’t new. We’ve been here many times before. C-71 just banned 15,000 “assault weapons”.

    “We need to ban these guns for the public good.”

    ...time...more criminal violence

    “We need to ban these guns for the public good.”

    and on and on it goes.
    The solution?

    Repeal prohibition/restriction/registration.

    Why should we demand less?
    To show that men can travel to the moon and return, use the American experience.

    To show that public safety isn’t hurt by responsible individuals carrying to protect life, use the American experience.

  7. #16
    Senior Member M1917 Enfield's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug_M View Post
    Exactly! This isn’t new. We’ve been here many times before. C-71 just banned 15,000 “assault weapons”.

    “We need to ban these guns for the public good.”

    ...time...more criminal violence

    “We need to ban these guns for the public good.”

    and on and on it goes.
    And then when all or most guns are banned like in some other countries and still the killing and murders continue they ignore or shrug their shoulders at the criminal gun crime and shootings and they then move onto banning other inanimate objects like knifes.
    I live among lots of sheeple and dim witted who like to think they are good Canadians for voting Lieberal

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    TheMerlin (11-17-2019)

  9. #17
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    "...an associate professor from Ryerson University..." Looks like that one learned everything she knows from Kookie Wendy.
    "...prohibiting full auto was supposed to stop violence..." No, it wasn't. FA have been prohibited since the mid 1930's. The FAC was supposed to do that in 1978.
    "...banning switch blades and brass knuckles..." You missed the evil morning star(a Medieval weapon), nunchuks(that despite being prohibited since 1978 you can still buy on Amazon.ca), blow guns and shuriken. Plus any kind of folding knife you can open with one hand or centrifugal force, etc, etc.
    Slavery was legal here until 1834. No Irish slaves but that didn't mean us Paddy's were not persecuted. Just like in the U.S.
    Lotta the current issues with gangs was caused by Junior's daddy when he opened the immigration gates to Third World Commonwealth countries. Trudeau the Elder's buddy Manley of Jamaica promptly emptied his jails just like Castro did.

  10. #18
    Senior Member M1917 Enfield's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Justice View Post
    "...an associate professor from Ryerson University..." Looks like that one learned everything she knows from Kookie Wendy.
    "...prohibiting full auto was supposed to stop violence..." No, it wasn't. FA have been prohibited since the mid 1930's. The FAC was supposed to do that in 1978.
    "...banning switch blades and brass knuckles..." You missed the evil morning star(a Medieval weapon), nunchuks(that despite being prohibited since 1978 you can still buy on Amazon.ca), blow guns and shuriken. Plus any kind of folding knife you can open with one hand or centrifugal force, etc, etc.
    Slavery was legal here until 1834. No Irish slaves but that didn't mean us Paddy's were not persecuted. Just like in the U.S.
    Lotta the current issues with gangs was caused by Junior's daddy when he opened the immigration gates to Third World Commonwealth countries. Trudeau the Elder's buddy Manley of Jamaica promptly emptied his jails just like Castro did.
    Quote:

    The story of the Society of Masterless Men, which included women and children, began in the 18th-century settlement of Ferryland, in Newfoundland. In order to colonize Newfoundland, The British Empire created plantations. These were settlements of primarily Irish indentured servants, many of them very young -thus their name- the Irish Youngsters, abducted from Ireland either by force or guile and brought to the South Shore of Newfoundland where they were literally sold to fishing masters. Their price: $50 a head. In 1700's Newfoundland the British Navy wielded its authority over its seamen with zero compassion and nothing but discipline enforced by abuse and violence. Because there wasn't a local police force, they also helped reinforce the authority of the local fishing masters. These masters were essentially the Lords and Ladies of the villages, living in luxury and security while surrounded by dozens, even hundreds, of indentured servants who fished and labored in the camps processing the catch.

    https://stairnaheireann.net/2018/01/...-newfoundland/

    https://newfoundlandshop.ca/Music_TheMasterlessMen.htm

    https://canadalibre.ca/en_anglais/di...-white-slaves/

    https://www.globalresearch.ca/the-ir...e-slaves/31076

    King James II and Charles I also led a continued effort to enslave the Irish. Britain’s famed Oliver Cromwell furthered this practice of dehumanizing one’s next door neighbor.

    The Irish slave trade began when 30,000 Irish prisoners were sold as slaves to the New World. The King James I Proclamation of 1625 required Irish political prisoners be sent overseas and sold to English settlers in the West Indies. By the mid 1600s, the Irish were the main slaves sold to Antigua and Montserrat. At that time, 70% of the total population of Montserrat were Irish slaves.

    Ireland quickly became the biggest source of human livestock for English merchants. The majority of the early slaves to the New World were actually white.

    From 1641 to 1652, over 500,000 Irish were killed by the English and another 300,000 were sold as slaves. Ireland’s population fell from about 1,500,000 to 600,000 in one single decade. Families were ripped apart as the British did not allow Irish dads to take their wives and children with them across the Atlantic. This led to a helpless population of homeless women and children. Britain’s solution was to auction them off as well.

    During the 1650s, over 100,000 Irish children between the ages of 10 and 14 were taken from their parents and sold as slaves in the West Indies, Virginia and New England. In this decade, 52,000 Irish (mostly women and children) were sold to Barbados and Virginia. Another 30,000 Irish men and women were also transported and sold to the highest bidder. In 1656, Cromwell ordered that 2000 Irish children be taken to Jamaica and sold as slaves to English settlers.

    Many people today will avoid calling the Irish slaves what they truly were: Slaves. They’ll come up with terms like “Indentured Servants” to describe what occurred to the Irish. However, in most cases from the 17th and 18th centuries, Irish slaves were nothing more than human cattle.

    As an example, the African slave trade was just beginning during this same period. It is well recorded that African slaves, not tainted with the stain of the hated Catholic theology and more expensive to purchase, were often treated far better than their Irish counterparts.

    African slaves were very expensive during the late 1600s (50 Sterling). Irish slaves came cheap (no more than 5 Sterling). If a planter whipped or branded or beat an Irish slave to death, it was never a crime. A death was a monetary setback, but far cheaper than killing a more expensive African. The English masters quickly began breeding the Irish women for both their own personal pleasure and for greater profit. Children of slaves were themselves slaves, which increased the size of the master’s free workforce. Even if an Irish woman somehow obtained her freedom, her kids would remain slaves of her master. Thus, Irish moms, even with this new found emancipation, would seldom abandon their kids and would remain in servitude.

    In time, the English thought of a better way to use these women (in many cases, girls as young as 12) to increase their market share: The settlers began to breed Irish women and girls with African men to produce slaves with a distinct complexion. These new “mulatto” slaves brought a higher price than Irish livestock and, likewise, enabled the settlers to save money rather than purchase new African slaves. This practice of interbreeding Irish females with African men went on for several decades and was so widespread that, in 1681, legislation was passed “forbidding the practice of mating Irish slave women to African slave men for the purpose of producing slaves for sale.” In short, it was stopped only because it interfered with the profits of a large slave transport company.

    England continued to ship tens of thousands of Irish slaves for more than a century. Records state that, after the 1798 Irish Rebellion, thousands of Irish slaves were sold to both America and Australia. There were horrible abuses of both African and Irish captives. One British ship even dumped 1,302 slaves into the Atlantic Ocean so that the crew would have plenty of food to eat.

    There is little question that the Irish experienced the horrors of slavery as much (if not more in the 17th Century) as the Africans did. There is, also, very little question that those brown, tanned faces you witness in your travels to the West Indies are very likely a combination of African and Irish ancestry. In 1839, Britain finally decided on its own to end its participation in Satan’s highway to hell and stopped transporting slaves. While their decision did not stop pirates from doing what they desired, the new law slowly concluded THIS chapter of nightmarish Irish misery.

    But, if anyone, black or white, believes that slavery was only an African experience, then they’ve got it completely wrong.

    Irish slavery is a subject worth remembering, not erasing from our memories.

    But, where are our public (and PRIVATE) schools???? Where are the history books? Why is it so seldom discussed?

    Do the memories of hundreds of thousands of Irish victims merit more than a mention from an unknown writer?

    Or is their story to be one that their English pirates intended: To (unlike the African book) have the Irish story utterly and completely disappear as if it never happened.

    None of the Irish victims ever made it back to their homeland to describe their ordeal. These are the lost slaves; the ones that time and biased history books conveniently forgot.



    The original source of this article is Oped News
    Copyright © John Martin, Oped News , 2018



    Interesting historical note: the last person killed at the Salem Witch Trials was Ann Glover. She and her husband had originally been shipped to Barbados as a slave in the 1650’s. Her husband was killed there for refusing to renounce catholicism.

    In the 1680’s she was working as a housekeeper in Salem. After some of the children she was caring for got sick she was accused of being a witch.

    At the trial they demanded she say the Lord’s Prayer. She did so, but in Gaelic, because she didn’t know English. She was then hung.

    Glover was arrested and tried for witchcraft. Her answers could not be understood, and for a time her accusers thought she was speaking a language of the devil, but it became clear that this was not the case. In the words of her leading accuser, the Reverend Cotton Mather, "the court could have no answer from her but in the Irish which was her native language..." (Memorable Providence, 1689). By that time she had apparently lost the ability to speak English, though she could still understand it. An interpreter was found for her and the trial proceeded.

    Cotton Mather wrote that Glover was "a scandalous old Irishwoman, very poor, a Roman Catholic and obstinate in idolatry." At her trial it was demanded of her to say the Lord's Prayer. She recited it in Irish and broken Latin, but was unable to say it in English. There was a belief that an inability to recite the Lord's prayer in english was the mark of a witch.


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    81FoaaH1HbL.jpg
    I live among lots of sheeple and dim witted who like to think they are good Canadians for voting Lieberal

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