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  1. #11
    Senior Member Waterloomike's Avatar
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    What did you cover your rack with?

    BTW, very sweet cottage.


    Allow our Rightful Liberty or .....

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by blacksmithden View Post
    I posted this in another thread, but figured there's been enough discussion about it over the years that it should have it's own spot.

    There's 3 things I don't like about pellet stoves.

    The first is the availability of pellets. You're at the mercy of market prices and availability. A couple of years ago, there was a shortage of them in....BC I believe it was. Wood pellets arent something you can make yourself in quantity. You can always find wood to burn in one form or another. Preferably you cut your own or buy it cheap enough that it isn't worth your time. In a jam, you can burn old pallets, scrap lumber (if it's dry), sticks you picked up in the park, or whatever. Just make sure it isn't treated wood. Your chimney might not like it, and you don't want your neighbor growing a tail from the toxins. Nobody who owns a woodstove ever needs a paper shredder either.

    My second concern is, as has been mentioned, mechanical failure. Electric motors and control boards are not something I want to deal with long term.

    The third is that they require electric power. While a woodstove might have an electric air blower on the back of it, it isn't necessary for the stove's proper operation.

    Most woodstoves have 2 moving parts. The door, and the air inlet control. There's no reason for either one to ever fail. Modern woodstoves might require new ceramic baffle boards inside every 4 or 5 years, but they will still make heat without them, just not as efficiently. The same goes with stoves that use a catalytic combustor. I recommend staying away from those just in case you decide that you need to burn something in the stove that isn't exactly clean dry wood. A few years back, I bought a tune-up kit for my stove from the manufacturer. $124 for the 2 baffle boards and a new set of door/window seals. Im into year 3 of 4 with this stove and so far haven't needed to do anything to it other than empty the ashes now and again.

    All that said, pellet stoves don't have problems with bugs in the pellets (although that hasn't been a problem for me with firewood either.) You don't get bark chips or splinters in the house with pellets either. I solved that one by putting in a loading hatch/door right beside the stove. Pellet stoves are easy to load, and you should never have any puffs of smoke escaping into the house if you have sensitive people in there.

    There's advantages and disadvantages to both. From an ease of use standpoint, pellet stoves win hands down. From a reliability and personal independence standpoint, wood is the way to go. From a pure "amount of labor involved", pellet is better. Also, you can buy a pellet stove with a hopper that will last a few days if you need to go away. Wood on the other hand will max out between 6 and 12 hours before you have to feed it again....that is unless you get into outdoor boilers and such, but that's beyond the scope of my discussion. With pellet stoves, you can either place an order and have you entire years worth of heat delivered in nice clean bags that stack fairly well or go to the hardware store and pick it up yourself. You know what you're getting and there's no further issues other than where to put it. With wood, you have to worry about moisture content. If you're ordering it from someone, are they being honest about it being dry ? If you cut it yourself, you need to look for either dry standing stuff or cut it yourself a year or two ahead of time and let it dry like I do.

    Woodstove chimneys need periodic inspections to make sure they're not getting plugged up and cleanings if necessary. I only burn properly seasoned (dried) wood and I run it good and hot every 3 or 4 loads. I've never had the slightest bit of buildup in my chimney. Smoke is another consideration depending on where you are. Modern woodstoves are very efficient. If you're burning properly seasoned wood and running it properly, this greatly cuts down on the smoke that might get your neighbors up in arms. I don't believe pellet stoves have much of a smoke issue. From an ascetics point of view, there are few things that I enjoy more than sitting in front of my woodstove watching the fire on a freezing cold night. You just don't get that with a pellet stove.

    So you see....there are advantages and disadvantages to both. If you want true "off the grid" security then it's a woodstove you're after. If you want less work and a clean operation, pellet is what you're after.

    Anyway...I've been around woodstoves since I was a kid and I've had one in my own house for just over 10 years now. If you have any questions, feel free to ask and I'll do what I can to answer them. Hopefully somebody will chime in who uses a pellet stove, and shares their experience with us.

    Cheers !
    My insurance won't insure a pellet stove as a main heat source, woodstove is ok. They said a woodstove is checked every 4 hours or so, pellet stoves can go for 4 days without checking, also a woodstove doesn't store its fuel on top of itself.

  3. The Following User Liked This Post By Greglc

    blacksmithden (02-22-2020)

  4. #13
    Senior Member LB303's Avatar
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    From an ascetics point of view, there are few things that I enjoy more than sitting in front of my woodstove watching the fire on a freezing cold night.
    It's also aesthetically good.
    As a fellow ascetic, I find a fire more interesting and pleasant than most of what's on the shadow box at the opposite end of the rec room.

  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by LB303 View Post
    It's also aesthetically good.
    As a fellow ascetic, I find a fire more interesting and pleasant than most of what's on the shadow box at the opposite end of the rec room.
    As an ascetic are you required to forego the pleasures of gun porn? Or of making aesthetically pleasing cloverleaf groupings?
    We were told he wasn't ready, now we know he will never be!
    Rewarding 4 years of incompetence and corruption with 4 more years, says a lot about our electorate.

  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Waterloomike View Post
    What did you cover your rack with?

    BTW, very sweet cottage.
    Thanks.

    Rack is coated with a basic shellac. It's my dad's thing, has shiny antlers all over his house...

  7. #16
    Resident Combine Pilot JustBen's Avatar
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    I'm not sure exactly what make and model my Dad runs on the farm but he can burn pellets or grain. Being a farmer, grain is cheap - cheaper than pellets for sure... but the pellets seem to have better heat.

  8. #17
    Senior Member Grimlock's Avatar
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    I know a farmer with one that will burn corn.

  9. #18
    Senior Member LB303's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Magi View Post
    As an ascetic are you required to forego the pleasures of gun porn? Or of making aesthetically pleasing cloverleaf groupings?
    The quest for that one-hole grouping is where mind and matter come together, grasshopper

  10. The Following User Liked This Post By LB303

    Magi (02-22-2020)

  11. #19
    Member awndray's Avatar
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    :

  12. #20
    Senior Member wolver's Avatar
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    Wood/pellet stoves two greatest enemies are insurance companies and government. Neither one want you to have one.

    Insurance companies can drop you, and governments can, and have, banned them in some locales.

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