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  1. #1
    Senior Member RangeBob's Avatar
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    B.C. hunting licences, wild game permits show dramatic uptick

    April 6 2020
    British Columbia

    Hunters could be out in greater numbers this year to secure food supplies as the world grapples with the COVID-19 pandemic.

    “With everything that’s going on and the food shortages, hunting is something I want to teach my kids,” said Ryan Deleurme. “I always assumed I would show them the way I learned from my dad, and this seems like the right time.

    He grew up hunting deer and moose with his father and uncles, but let hunting lapse while he raised a family.

    Deleurme has spent the past couple of weeks working out how online licence applications work and how to apply for the Limited Entry lottery, in hopes of landing a permit to harvest a moose.

    He is not alone.

    The number of hunting licences sold to British Columbians more than doubled in the first three months of 2020 compared with the same period in each of the past three years, with more than 4,852 already granted.

    More than 3,500 permits to harvest white tail and mule deer have also been issued in that time, compared with just 1,091 last year. Interest in elk, caribou bison and moose has doubled over previous years.
    Article content continued

    Combined sales of all species permits and hunting licences in January, February and March this year totalled 17,356, compared with 9,073 last year.

    “I’ve been going to the gun store to get bullets and targets to practice with my boys,” said Deleurme. “The local shop is sold out. They said it’s just been crazy.”

    Less-scrupulous hunters may be taking advantage of the pandemic to hunt without the proper permits, according to B.C.’s Chief Conservation Officer Doug Forsdick.

    “We have seen an increase in calls to our (Report All Poachers and Polluters) call centre,” he said. “And our conservation officers are out there keeping an eye on things and having that deterrent factor by being there.”
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    Novice hunters and hunters who haven’t been out recently should ensure they know how to identify the animals that they are licensed to harvest.

    If you make an honest mistake and shoot the wrong animal, it is better to call the Conservation Officer Service and report it, than have someone else report you, Forsdick added.

    “I’ve noticed signals of increased demand for our firearms course and I do think there is increased interest in taking responsibility for where your food comes from,” said hunting instructor Dylan Eyers of EatWild. “I’m even sprouting some vegetables on my window sill.”

    Black bear permits are also up so far this year, and they are relatively easy food prey for novice hunters, plus B.C.’s black bear populations are very healthy, he said.
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    Like other instructors, Eyers has temporarily cancelled his hands-on firearms safety classes and in-person Conservation and Outdoor Recreation Education classes. The B.C. Wildlife Federation offers an online version of CORE, which is required before you can obtain a hunting licence.

    For the time being, EatWild will offer urban foraging courses instead, using Zoom teleconferencing.

    “It’s sort of spooky going to the grocery store now, so I think people would rather be outside looking for food,” he said.

    Hunters going for black bear are likely driving recent interest in new hunting licences, because the season opened this week, said Jesse Zeman, spokesman for the B.C. Wildlife Federation.
    Article content continued

    “People haven’t hunted black bear that much, but they are very productive right across the province,” he said. “You don’t have to travel very far to get them and there is no Limited Entry lottery to get a permit.”

    Zeman expects freshwater fishing licences will also be in hot demand this year as people prepare for uncertain times ahead.

    “Once the ice comes off, we will see that take off in a big way,” he said. “You don’t want to be travelling all over the province to little towns, but there is rainbow trout in just about everyone’s backyard, so you don’t have to go far to get it.”

    People who haven’t been in the backcountry for a while should review the CORE manual for species identification before heading out, and make sure someone knows where you are going and when you should be back, he added.

    hxxps://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/b-c-hunting-licences-wild-game-permits-show-dramatic-uptick/

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  3. #2
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    Except every LEO is out harassing anyone outside.

  4. #3
    Go Canucks Go! lone-wolf's Avatar
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    All recreational fishing has been cancelled till June 1st here.
    Hunting in NB looks to be in the same boat.
    the wild still lingered in him and the wolf in him merely slept

    "It must be poor life that achieves freedom from fear" - Aldo Leopold

  5. #4
    Senior Member RangeBob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lone-wolf View Post
    Hunting in NB looks to be in the same boat.
    There are two types of hunting that I'm familiar with.

    1. Where usually one, occasionally two, people go out looking for animals to shoot, and they absolutely require places that there aren't people around. Seems a perfect activity during COVID due to it's obvious isolation.
    2. Where a half dozen guys bring their rifles and ammo to a hunting lodge, and drink beer and play cards, and never take their guns out of their cases. This is affectionately known as 'the annual hunting trip'.



    For #1, I suppose it may require policing duties, but it probably takes exactly the same manpower to police a hunting prohibition.

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  7. #5
    Go Canucks Go! lone-wolf's Avatar
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    You can still go hunt coyotes, but the bear season seems up in the air.
    I didn't follow it closely, so some NBer can confirm/deny.

    No trout fishing on PEI, but you can still goto the canadian tire, buy some tackle, drive down to the lake, and stand by the water.
    Conclusion: Casting a line causes covid19.
    the wild still lingered in him and the wolf in him merely slept

    "It must be poor life that achieves freedom from fear" - Aldo Leopold

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  9. #6
    Senior Member RangeBob's Avatar
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    B.C. hunting licence sales nearly double during COVID-19 pandemic

    April 12 2020
    British Columbia

    More people are learning how to hunt this spring as COVID-19 physical distancing measures are preventing usual gatherings and activities.

    With bear hunting season already open April 1 and turkey season starting April 15, Jesse Zeman, director of fish and wildlife restoration with the BC Wildlife Federation, said more hunters are exploring the outdoors, and they're hunting for black bears in the Interior.

    The conservation organization has seen a significant increase in hunting licenses and tags for all species overall, Zeman said.

    B.C. hunting licence sales have nearly doubled from the previous year. There were 9,073 sales in January, February and March in 2019 compared to 2020 where the conservation organization has seen 17,758 sales during that same time period. Black bear licence sales have more than doubled, spiking from 1,886 in 2019 to 4,803 this year.

    “It seems like a lot more people are picking it up,” Zeman said, adding he expects to see more fishing licenses sold than in previous years once the ice clears off of all the lakes.

    So far, only 25,264 fishing licences have been sold, while 2019 had 26,687, but these are only comparing January, February and March sales for each year.

    The uptick in hunting licence sales is likely from a combination of factors: some people aren’t liking what they’re seeing in grocery stores, hunters who may have not hunted in previous years are taking it up again, and with new physical distancing measures, more people are spending time in the outdoors, Zeman said.

    With the pandemic, everyone is feeling a little anxious and stressed, and one of the best ways to decompress is to go outside, Zeman said.

    Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry has encouraged people to step outside for a breath of fresh air this weekend while asking that residents continue to physically distance themselves from one another.

    Firearm and ammunition sales have also jumped in the last month across the country.

    One store owner in Atlantic Canada said he has seen a huge surge in new shotgun sales and ammunition. Gun sales in the U.S. have also spiked, especially in areas with more cases of COVID-19.

    hxxps://infotel.ca/newsitem/bc-hunting-licences-sales-nearly-double-during-covid-19-pandemic/it72212

  10. #7
    Senior Member TheHydrant's Avatar
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    I emailed NR in Ontario to ask if Spring Turkey this season was affected . Below is their lengthy reply but to summarize, spring turkey is still on!

    "Thank you for your email –



    The health and well-being of the people of Ontario is our top priority. In response to COVID-19, Ontario has been diligently monitoring the developing situation and taking decisive action to contain the spread of this new virus to ensure the health and safety of all Ontarians. We recommend visiting Ontario.ca/coronavirus and Canada.ca/coronavirus to stay up-to-date with the latest information.



    In Ontario, the hunting season also have opening and closing dates vary depending on the species Generally, hunting seasons in Ontario are based on biological factors and closed seasons are used to protect a species at a vulnerable life stage (e.g., while in large wintering flocks or while nesting or raising young), or to protect a wildlife population from over-harvest.



    Adjusting hunting seasons in Ontario requires amendments to regulations under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act. Proposed future changes to regulated hunting season dates would require public consultation on Ontario’s Environmental Registry (https://ero.ontario.ca/). At this time there are no anticipated changes coming to the Ontario hunting regulations for this year. This means all regulations still need to be followed and licenses are still required to be purchased to participate in these activities.



    When any regulatory changes do occur, these are communicated to hunters and anglers through Ontario.ca, as well as through the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry’s social media channels.



    In any activity, be it fishing or hunting, it is important to continue to follow the restrictions in place for social and physical distancing as well as any facility/location closures."

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