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  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Mar 2020
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    Hamilton, ON.
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    Range Safety Course

    Well, this is my first topic since joining and I have a question about a range safety course. I am joining a southern Ontario range and I am booked for this course prior to joining.

    As I have never been a member previous, I am not sure what to expect. anything I should be studying up on?

    My question may seem stupid, but please bare in mind that I have had my PAL (previous FAC I think) since 1982, and back then you did not have do any course to get a license.

    Any advice is welcome, no matter how insignificant. Thanks

  2. #2
    Senior Member Doug_M's Avatar
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    Feb 2013
    Location
    Nova Scotia
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    Generally these are just to make sure people know the specific rules of that range, which are likely to be nearly identical to any other range with respect to conduct, firing line etc. You’ll be just fine.
    Pew pew pew

  3. #3
    Go Canucks Go! lone-wolf's Avatar
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    Apr 2012
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    Isle Saint-Jean
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    I'm guessing that's unique to the range you are joining, I wouldn't worry to much about it, if you've been shooting since 82 and don't have any extra holes in you - you're probably gonna be alright
    the wild still lingered in him and the wolf in him merely slept

    "It must be poor life that achieves freedom from fear" - Aldo Leopold

  4. The Following User Liked This Post By lone-wolf

    JDP (05-22-2020)

  5. #4
    Senior Member
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    Mar 2015
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    Burlington, Ontario
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    As Doug_M and lone-wolf said, however, some ranges consider themselves "special" and will rehash all the safety in the PAL/RPAL courses in addition to the range specifics. I was once told the "Range Safety Course" for a local club is actually a redo of the PAL/RPAL courses but I don't know if this true.
    Remember May 1, 2020 when they say: "we don't want your guns."
    The Turd Reich, where the law abiding get moistly shafted!

  6. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    Hamilton, ON.
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    The good news is that "I don't have any extra holes in me....lol", the bad news is that I most likely have a lot of bad habits do to the fact, I have never needed to take a PAL/RPAL course.
    My in-laws had property in Central Ontario to shoot on occasion, but have since retired and moved...sigh
    One of the first things I want to do, is hook up with a member or trainer and go over the finer details. Thanks everyone

  7. #6
    Senior Member RangeBob's Avatar
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    Mar 2014
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    Ontario
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    Sometimes the range safety course includes some parts of the CFSC as well, in case someone is joining who got a POL (i.e. licenced but never had to take the CFSC).

    Mine consisted of
    a) a lecture portion (firearm safety, range particulars, some history, some anecdotes related to safety and practical, what's next)
    b) a practical shooting portion (is your hand/eye/physical coordination sufficient, do you remember the safety and range rules)
    c) a "person of good character" one-on-one interview

  8. #7
    Ontario is it's own kind "of special" when it comes to the "Club Level Safety Course" that clubs are required in Ontario by the CFO to run... I run a range there, so I have personal knowledge.

    Most ranges are pretty reasonable; you go through some basic safety, the facility specific stuff and then go out to the range to do a dry run. Pretty straight forward.

    But then.... there are those clubs... that make you sit through 6-8 hours of hell and then do multiple "probationary" shoots through the entire calibre range... all to a set schedule that many find hard to attend, so becoming a member can take months before you can get an ATT to bring in your own firearms. I have known people who's memberships have expired for the first year before being able to get in for all the scheduled shoots.

    Yes, a CLSC is probably beneficial and if they were all under a couple of hours, I could get behind it. But the more barriers to entry we erect, the smaller our sport will become.

    I am thankful that we don't have a CFO in Alberta that makes us do that and as we will probably be getting an Alberta appointed one in the nearest future, it probably isn't on the horizon.

    JR

  9. The Following User Liked This Post By TSE JR

    lone-wolf (05-22-2020)

  10. #8
    Senior Member Yogi05's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    East of Ottawa
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    538
    Its actually a fed requirement. One of the SORxx-xx regs, but it doesn't prescribe a course, just a means of informing new members of the rules specific to that club.

    The Ontario CFO pushed for it more than the others. That's why it always seems like a CFO thing.

  11. #9
    Senior Member Grimlock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
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    1,923
    There may be a written test. If you know ACTS and PROVE from the stupid course you never had to take you will pass. It's mostly a formality.

  12. #10
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    Hamilton, ON.
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    For anyone interested, there was a small written test, followed by a firing test on the range. it actually was a lot of fun. even got to try a pistol for the first (and hopefully not last) time.
    I am now and member, and had a blast my first time out!

    Great group of people, and hope to meet many more as Covid19 restrictions ease.

  13. The Following 3 Users Like This Post By Jay Mack

    DanN (05-28-2020), lone-wolf (05-29-2020), Magi (05-28-2020)

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