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  1. #1
    Senior Member Battle Beaver's Avatar
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    Case law re: storage

    I know this was posted several years ago, but I can't find it.

    Wasn't there an Ontario "un-safe storage" charge that went to court several years ago, where the gun owner stored his firearms in a used/bought school locker type of "safe"?

    If I recall correctly, the judge in the case said that the "locker" met the definition of a "safe", because it was made of metal, and the un-safe storage charges were dropped.

    Is the court case online somewhere? If so, where can I find it?

    Thanks,
    Battle Beaver

    PS - Was having a "discussion" with a friend about firearms storage, mentioned this case to him...
    http://www.youtube.com/battlebeaver
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  2. #2
    Senior Member RangeBob's Avatar
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    Ontario 2011 Barnes

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  4. #3
    Senior Member RangeBob's Avatar
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    In my view, an interpretation of the word "safe" in its ordinary, dictionary meaning of a metal container with a secure lock is consistent with the objectives of the legislation and the intent of Parliament.

    https://www.rangebob.com/Canada/Safe...-Judgement.pdf

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  6. #4
    Super Moderator Rory McCanuck's Avatar
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    Two minutes.
    Have we mentioned lately that RangeBob is freakin' amazing?
    Don't blame me, I didn't vote for that clown. Oct 20, '15

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  8. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rory McCanuck View Post
    Two minutes.
    Have we mentioned lately that RangeBob is freakin' amazing?
    Agreed
    Lifetime Member PAPRC, SHA
    Member NFA, NRA, SRAC, FMFG, SFC

  9. #6
    Senior Member Battle Beaver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RangeBob View Post
    In my view, an interpretation of the word "safe" in its ordinary, dictionary meaning of a metal container with a secure lock is consistent with the objectives of the legislation and the intent of Parliament.

    https://www.rangebob.com/Canada/Safe...-Judgement.pdf
    I think RangeBob might be some kind of walking/breathing computer database covered in human skin.

    Thanks!
    http://www.youtube.com/battlebeaver
    ** Member CSSA, NSSF and NRA ** Why aren't you?

  10. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rory McCanuck View Post
    Two minutes.
    Have we mentioned lately that RangeBob is freakin' amazing?
    Quote Originally Posted by Battle Beaver View Post
    I think RangeBob might be some kind of walking/breathing computer database covered in human skin.

    Thanks!
    I think the term is polymath

    "Universal man" redirects here. For the sculpture by Canadian artist Gerald Gladstone, see Universal Man.
    For other uses, see Polymath (disambiguation).
    Ibn Sina
    Ibn Rushd
    Leonardo da Vinci
    Ibn Sina, Ibn Rushd, and Leonardo da Vinci.
    A polymath (Greek: πολυμαθής, polymathēs, "having learned much"; Latin: homo universalis, "universal man")[1] is an individual whose knowledge spans a significant number of subjects, known to draw on complex bodies of knowledge to solve specific problems. The earliest recorded use of the term in English is from 1624, in the second edition of The Anatomy of Melancholy by Robert Burton;[2] the form polymathist is slightly older, first appearing in the Diatribae upon the first part of the late History of Tithes of Richard Montagu in 1621.[3] Use in English of the similar term polyhistor dates from the late sixteenth century.[4]

    In Western Europe, the first work to use polymathy in its title (De Polymathia tractatio: integri operis de studiis veterum) was published in 1603 by Johann von Wowern (de), a Hamburg philosopher.[5][6][7] Von Wowern defined polymathy as "knowledge of various matters, drawn from all kinds of studies [...] ranging freely through all the fields of the disciplines, as far as the human mind, with unwearied industry, is able to pursue them".[5] Von Wowern lists erudition, literature, philology, philomathy and polyhistory as synonyms.

    Polymaths include the great scholars and thinkers of the Islamic Golden Age, the period of Renaissance and the Enlightenment, who excelled at several fields in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and the arts. In the Italian Renaissance, the idea of the polymath was expressed by Leon Battista Alberti (1404–1472) in the statement that "a man can do all things if he will".[8]

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